CARIBBEAN FOLK SONGS

CARIBBEAN FOLK SONGS

This page contains videos, lyrics of and commentary about selected Caribbean folk songs and rhymes. The purpose of this page to help raise awareness and appreciation of Caribbean folk songs.

Also, visit http://www.cocojams.com/content/caribbean-folk-dances for selected examples of Caribbean folk dances.

****
Ms. Azizi Powell,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Latest revision - March 20, 2014

****
WHAT I MEAN BY "CARIBBEAN FOLK SONGS
By "Caribbean folk songs" I mean "old" songs that are considered to be part of the folk heritage of a particular Caribbean nation or Caribbean nations. This definition includes songs that have known lyricists and/or known composers. Almost all of the songs featured on this page are secular (non-religious) and most of the songs included on this page are in English. I've included a few examples of children's rhymes on this page because children's rhymes are a sub-set of folk songs. Those examples and/or other examples of Caribbean children's rhymes may also be found on various Cocojams.com pages.

I'm mostly interested in versions of Caribbean folk songs that pre-date Harry Belafonte's recordings. However, this page also includes examples of popularized Caribbean folk songs. I'm also interested in comparing versions of the same song as performed by different vocalists. When there are more than one example of a particular song on this page, I've tried to post the earliest recorded or documented example first.

Almost all the songs that are featured on this page are in English or patois (English dialect). Also, most of the songs on this page are from Jamaica. The focus on Jamaican folk songs is in part because there appear to be more videos of those songs online than videos of other English language Caribbean songs. Furthermore, thanks to Harry Belafonte, Jamaican folk songs have been popularized worldwide much more than other Caribbean songs. However, contrary to prevailing opinion, those songs are not calypsos, but mentos. Click http://www.mentomusic.com/WhatIsMento.htm and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mento for information about mento music.

These Caribbean folk songs are posted for their aesthetic, folkloric, historical, educational, and entertainment value.

Some of the videos are presented without transcription or without videos. Please help by sending in transcriptions of and/or video links to those songs,

Sources Of The Videos That Are Featured On This Page

All of the videos on this page are from http://www.youtube.com/

Videos are posted in alphabetical order using the first letter of the name of the dance.

These examples are posted for folkloric, historical, and entertainment purposes.

Please note that links to YouTube videos or to other online resources may not remain viable. Please also be aware that comments posted on YouTube viewer comments threads may not be suitable for children or otherwise may not meet the standards of Cocojams.com

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AND THANKS
Thanks to all those who uploaded videos that are featured on this page. Also thanks to those commenters to those videos whose comments are quoted on this page,

CONTACT INFORMATION
Please send in video links of & comments about Caribbean Folk Songs to cocojams17@yahoo.com

Your email address is never posted or shared.

RELATED COCOJAMS PAGES
http://www.cocojams.com/content/caribbean-folk-dances

http://www.cocojams.com/content/sea-shanties-chanteys-neglected-area-bla...

****
EXAMPLES OF CARIBBEAN FOLK SONGS
(posted in alphabetical order according to the title of the song)

A, B
AY ZUZUMA
Country: Jamaica
Language: Jamaican Creole

Lyrics:
Me gone a town y'ereg, Ay Zuzuma
Mind me pig fe me
Min' me goat fe me
Me gone a town y'ereg, Ay Zuzuma

Me gone a town, oh Zuzuma
Me gone a town, oh Zuzuma

More info:
"Ay Zuzuma" is a Jamaican children's circle game in which a man goes to town to go to the market and leaves a woman to make lunch. When he returns she tells him all the things she's cooked for him – corn pork and saltfish. Found on Smithsonian Folkways album, "Children's Jamaican Songs and Games."
- from http://www.allaroundthisworld.com/songs-caribbean.html

****
THE BANANA BOAT SONG
The entry for this song is listed under "Day Dah Light" (Day O)

****
BANANA MEDLEY

Bog Walk High sings a "Banana Medley"

Uploaded by pussjook on Oct 17, 2008

Bog Walk High [Jamaica] sings a "Banana Medley" on All Together Sing 2008.

****
BO CALINDA
Country: Trinidad
Language: English

Lyrics:
Bo Bo Bo Calinda
Bo Bo Bo Calinda
Bo Bo Bo Calinda
What you do my darlin'

Right hand up, Bo Calinda
Right hand up, Bo Calinda
Right hand up, Bo Calinda
What you do my darlin'

More info:
A traditional Trinidadian children's dance found on the Smithsonian Folkways CD, "Caribbean Songs and Games for Children."
- http://www.allaroundthisworld.com/songs-caribbean.html

****
BONGO MAN

Uploaded by giulianava on Jan 26, 2010
"album___Jamaica Before Ska"
Louise Bennett- "Bongo Man"

country- Jamaica

-snip-

"Bongo man" (or "bungo man") is often a derogatory referent for a very dark skinned Black man" or a rough uncivilized acting Black man. Read the notes for the song "Bungo Moolatta" given below.

****
BROWN GIRL IN THE RING
Brown girl in the ring
Tra la la la la
There's a brown girl in the ring
Tra la la la la la
Brown girl in the ring
Tra la la la la
She looks like a sugar in a plum
Plum plum

Show me your motion
Tra la la la la
Come on show me your motion
Tra la la la la la
Show me your motion
Tra la la la la
She looks like a sugar in a plum
Plum plum
-various sources
-snip-
Other verses are "Skip across the ocean..." and "Who do you choose..."

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/11/boney-m-brown-girl-in-ring-video... for a post on my cultural blog about Boney M's version of this song, and about the game song "Brown Girl In The Ring".

****
BUNGO MOOLATTA
Bungo Moolatta, Bungo Moolatta
Who de go married you?
You hand full a ring an' you can't do a t'ing
Who de go married you?
Me give you me shirt fe wash
You burn up me shirt with iron
Who de go married you?
You hand full a ring an' you can't do a t'ing
-Walter Jekyll, Jamaican Song And Story 1904; Dover Reprints

-snip-

A similar song & video called "Jesse Mahon" (Pack She Back To She Ma) is posted below.

Visit http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=138244&messages=32 "Big Big Sambo Lady" for more comments about songs similar to these songs.

Incidentally, "Sambo" was a Caribbean term for a person of Black/White ancestry. Also, Walter Jekyll is quoted in the above thread as writing that a "Bungo" is "a rough, uncivilized African" and "Moolatta" is "the child of two Brown parents, Brown being the offspring of Black and White. He has rather a yellow skin."

****
C,D
CHI CHI BUD
Chi chi bud, oh! Some of the holler some a bawl, ["bud" = bird]
Some a band neck[?], some a woodpecker, some are brown dove, some are white wing
Chi chi bud, oh! Why Chi chi bud, oh!
Some are brown dove, some are John Crow, some are handsticker[?], some are band neck,
-traditional Jamaican mento; lyrics from "Jamaica Mentos", traditional, arrangement by Lord Messam as posted on http://www.mentomusic.com/messam.htm#lyrics

Here's a sound file of "Chi Chi Bud"

Max Romeo-"Chi Chi Bud"

loaded by kajjagoogoo on Jul 20, 2008
"old...old skool"
.
Here's a comment from that video's viewer comment thread:
"...it's an old, old traditional song, Max Romeo adapted the lyrics as a overall commentary about Jamaican society - "some a big shot", "some a sufferah" "some a criminal, some a ginal" (con man, hustler, etc). there was a huge divide between the rich and poor, and the "share the wealth" sentiment of the song was a popular theme for the PNP party that put Michael Manley in office in 1972......... "Let The Power Fall On I" , off this same album was his huge hit at the time."
-blakbeltjonez ; 2009

****
CONCH STYLE
Monkey married to baboon sister
Kiss his lips and make it blister
What you think they had for dinner
Black eye peas and monkey liver
Conch style, oh aunt Johnny
Conch style, oh aunt Johnny
- David Bowen, Cultural Officer, Turks & Caicos Tourist Board ; Rediscovery the Hidden Culture- Folk Songs; http://www.timespub.tc/2002/06/rediscovering-the-hidden-culture-folk-songs/ (Turks & Caicos Islands) ; posted summer 2002; retrieved June 2, 2011

Editor:
"Conch Style" is a variant form of the 19th century American song " The Monkey Married the Baboon's Sister" . That song was featured in a 1927 book of American tunes that was compiled by Carl Sandberg but the oldest documented version of this song is from 1860 United States.

Click http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folk-song-lyrics/Monkeys_Wedding.htm for the full lyrics to that song. Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y46np6ciLbs for a video of an American version of that song. Also click http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=1711 " The Monkey Married the Baboon's Sister " for more lyrics of and information about this song.

The tune of "The Monkey's Wedding" -as sung on that video-is smilar to the tunes for the children's songs "Paw Paw Patch" and "Frog Went A Courting". The verse about "what do you think they had for dinner?" is also like "what will the wedding supper be" in "Frog Went A Courtin". I'm not sure if the "Conch Style" song has the same tune.

Here's information from David Bowen about this Turk & Caicos version of "The Monkey's Wedding" :

"The song “Conch Style,” taught to me by my aunt, Mrs. Mary “Titta” Quelch of Overback, Grand Turk, is a good example of a humorous folk song. The “Conch Style” is also a folk dance where the dancer hooks one foot around the back of the other ankle with a quick shuffle step in-between to change legs. Hooking the foot represents the claw or foot of the conch."

****
CONGOTAY
One day, one day
Congotay
I went down to the bay.
Congotay
I meet an ol' lady,
Congotay
With a bag of chickens,
Congotay
I ask her for one,
Congotay
But she wouldn't give me,
Congotay
She's a greedy Mama,
Congotay
So I took it anyway.

" 'Congotay' is an alternating chant game in which two lines of children stand facing each other with the leader (Mama) of one side protecting the children (chickens) behind her."
- Grace Hallworth: Down By The River: Afro-Caribbean Rhymes, Games, And Songs For Children (New York: Scholastic Inc, 1996)

Editor:
Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-rhymes-cheers for similar rhymes including "Bull Inna Penn" from Jamaica and "Chicama Chicama Craney Crow" from the United States.

****
CORDELIA BROWN (CUDELIA BROWN)
Editor's note: Examples of this song are posted here in relative chronological order without regard for the spelling of that first name.

CUDELIA BROWN (Example #1)
O Cudelia Brown,
Wha mek yu head so red? (Yu head so red!)
O Cudelia Brown,
Wha mek yu head so red? (Yu head so red!)
Yu si' dung eena di sunshine wit' nut'n 'pon yu head,
O Cudelia Brown,
Wha mek yu head so red? (Yu head so red!)

On a moonshine night, on a moonshine night,
I met Missa Ivan, an' Missa Ivan tol' me,
Sey dat 'im gi Neita di drop, Jamaica flop, and di moonshine drop,
Ee-hee-aw, haw; Ee-hee-aw, haw; Ee-hee-aw, haw.
-from Noel Dexter and Godfrey Taylor: Mango Time: Folk Songs of Jamaica (Ian Randle Publishers ; 2007)

* This song is also known as "Cordelia Brown"

Editor: This version of "Cordelia Brown" was included in Louise Bennett's 1954 record Jamaican Folk Songs", an LP on the Folkways label [F-6846].. As such. it predates the 1957 Lord Burgess version of this song that was popularized by Harry Belafonte. http://www.akh.se/lyrics/cordelia_brown.htm

Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcUNWfxCfko for a sound file of Louise Bennet singing Cudelia Brown. (embedding this video is disabled).

Also, click http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=76631#3159758 Lyr Req: Cudelia Brown / Cordelia Brown to read my comments and other comments about "Cordelia Brown"/ "Cudelia Brown".

To summarize my opinion of what this song means, the singers taunt Cordelia because her hair's naturally red hair color is different from the hair color of others in her village. They ask her "What makes your hear red?" knowing that it is because she is mixed race. Notice that the second verse of that version gives an account of Mr. Ivan (a White man) "having relation" with Cordelia's mother Neita (Nita").

****
CORDELIA BROWN (Example #2)
Oh, Cordelia Brown, although' you never tell,
Oh, Cordelia Brown, still I know your secret well
Yes you fell in love with Ned
And when he left, your head turned red
And right well you know,
That what I say is true

Oh, Cordelia Brown, what make your head so red
Oh, Cordelia Brown, what make your head so red
You say you come out in the sunshine
With nothing on your head
Oh, Cordelia Brown, what make your head so red

Oh, Cordelia Brown, yes I've been far and wide
Now I'm telling you, every girl wants to be a bride
So I know what happen to you
And please strike me down if it isn't true
He said he never would wed,
And that when your head turned red

Oh, Cordelia Brown, what make your head so red
Oh, Cordelia Brown, what make your head so red
You say you come out in the sunshine
With nothing on your head
Oh, Cordelia Brown, what make your head so red

Oh, Cordelia Brown, Saw you waiting' at the train,
Yes, he's gone away, might never return again
Now miss Brown may I confess,
I've yearned this long for your caress
Since your head so red
I think I'll marry Mabel instead

Oh, Cordelia Brown, what make your head so red
Oh, Cordelia Brown, what make your head so red
You say you come out in the sunshine
With nothing on your head
Oh, Cordelia Brown, what make your head so red

- http://www.nomorelyrics.net/harry_belafonte-lyrics/176355-cordelia_brown...
composer: Lord Burgess; performer most associated with this song: Harry Belafonte

Here's a video of this song:

Harry Belafonte - Cordelia Brown

Uploaded by Cupa42 on Mar 7, 2010

****
DAY DAH LIGHT (Day O) (Example #1)

Chorus
Day-o, Day-o!
Day dah light and mi waan go home

1. Come missa tallyman, come tally mi banana,
Come missa tallyman, tally mi banana
(Chorus)

Six han' seven han', eight han' bunch!

2. Checka dem a check, but dem check wid caution,
Mi back dis a bruk wid pure exhaustion,
(Chorus)

3.Mi come yah fi wuk, mi no come yah fi igle,
No gi me soso bunch, mi no horse wid bridle.
(Chorus)
-recorded by Edric Connor, Westminster WP-6038, and also in the collection Folk Songs of Jamaica, Tom Murray, 1952, Oxford Univ. Press; song used by permission in Jim Morse, Folk Songs of the Caribbean, 1958, Bantam Books.

Uploaded by ThreadCityDeanF on Oct 30, 2010

The inspiration for Harry Belafonte's "Day-O."

****
THE BANANA BOAT SONG (Day O) (Version #2 of Day Dah Light)
(by Lord Burgess ; as performed by Harry Belafonte)

Day-o, day-ay-ay-o
Daylight come and me wan' go home
Day-o, day-ay-ay-o
Daylight come and me wan' go home

Work all night on a drink of rum
Daylight come and me wan' go home
Stack banana till de morning come
Daylight come and me wan' go home

Come, Mister tally man, tally me banana
Daylight come and me wan' go home
Come, Mister tally man, tally me banana
Daylight come and me wan' go home

Lift six foot, seven foot, eight foot bunch
Daylight come and me wan' go home
Six foot, seven foot, eight foot bunch
Daylight come and me wan' go home

Day, me say day-ay-ay-o
Daylight come and me wan' go home
Day, me say day, me say day, me say day
Daylight come and me wan' go home

Beautiful bunch of ripe banana
Daylight come and me wan' go home
Hide the deadly black tarantula
Daylight come and me wan' go home
Lift six foot, seven foot, eight foot bunch
Daylight come and me wan' go home

Six foot, seven foot, eight foot bunch
Daylight come and me wan' go home
Day, me say day-ay-ay-o
Daylight come and me wan' go home
Day, me say day, me say day, me say day
Daylight come and me wan' go home

Come, Mister tally man, tally me banana
Daylight come and me wan' go home
Come, Mister tally man, tally me banana
Daylight come and me wan' go home
Day-o, day-ay-ay-o
Daylight come and me wan' go home
Day, me say day, me say day, me say day....ay-ay-o
Daylight come and me wan' go home
- posted on http://www.digihitch.com/road-culture/music-lyrics/419

Here's a video of that song:

Uploaded by 667none on Nov 2, 2009

Harry Belafonte - "Banana Boat (Day O)" - 1956

****
DE RIBBER BEEN COM DUNG

Edric Connor - De Ribber Ben Come Dung/Bamboo (1952) Jamaican folk song

Uploaded by WhyNotTruth on Nov 9, 2008
"A Digging Song"

Editor:
"Dung"="Down"

****
Dinki Mini Song (Jamaica)

Uploaded by superbanjo on May 4, 2010

After Jolly Boys rehearsal on May 3, Albert sang this ring song he got from his parents when he was young. That's Powda in the background. (Apologies for the poor quality...taken on my iPhone.)

-snip-

Here's information from http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_Dinki_Mini about the term "dinki mini"

"Dinki Mini originates from the Congolese word `ndingi' which means lamentation or funeral song. Dinkies are celebratory occasions. Although associated with death, the music is lively, joyous and exciting, intending to cheer the family and friends of the dead person. Dinki Mini was practised openly throughout slavery but is now done mainly during Jamaica's annual Festival activities.

This dance is performed mainly in the parishes of St. Mary, St. Ann, St. Andrew and Portland and Gerreh is found in Hanover, Westmoreland and St. James.

The Dinki Mini dance focuses on the pelvic region as it is performed in defiance of the death that has occurred. The dancers, male and female, make suggestive rotations with the pelvis in an attempt to prove that they are stronger than death, as they have the means to reproduce.

Instruments associated with the Dinki Mini are shakas, katta sticks, condensed milk tins, grater, the tamboo (a cylinder l shaped drum) and the benta. The benta is an ancient stringed instrument made of bamboo and a gourd resonator.

The lyrics of the songs associated with the Gerreh are also suggestive. Gerreh has another dimension, however, called the bamboo dance. This is dancing on elevated bamboo poles and between four bamboo poles brought together and pulled back by four crouching players."

-snip-
Click this page of my blog: http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/08/jamaican-dinki-mini-dancing.html "Jamaican Dinki Mini Dancing" for video examples of dinki mini. That page also includes a link to a short video that includes an example of Gerreh dancing.

E
EMMANUEL ROAD (also known as "Mandeville Road" and "Go Down Manuel Road")
Editor: Examples of this song and the game associated with it often have the title "Manuel Road".

MANUEL ROAD (Example #1)
Go dung ah Manuel Road galang boy
Fi go bruk rock stone
Go dung ah Manuel Road galang boy
Fi go bruk rock stone
Bruk dem one by one...Galang boy
bruk dem 2 by 2...Galang boy
Finga mash nuh bawl
Rememba ah play wi a play...
sometin suh.....
-Ack33, http://www.youtube.com/all_comments?v=oZNgBzxrKVc , 2007
-snip-
Here's the Standard American English translation of those Jamaican Patois words (with the exception of the last two words which may indicate that you are suppose to continue singing in that same pattern)

Go down Manuel Road, gal and boy
[you've got] To break rock stone
Go down Manuel Road, gal and boy
[you've got] To break rock stone

Break them one by one (gal and boy)
Break them two by two...(gal and boy)
if your finger gets mashed, don't cry
Remember this is just a game*

* [ Remember we're just playing (so don't get angry or upset) ]

Here's that video:

brandeely | January 15, 2007
This is the stone game. It's a traditional Jamaican childhood game played in rythm to a patois song.

-snip-

Click http://www.jambalayah.com/node/931 to find this video and excerpts from that video's viewer comment thread.

****
EMMANUEL ROAD (Example #2)
Goh dung ah manuel road galang bwoy
fi goh bruk rock stone
goh dung a manuel road glalng bwoy
fi goh bruk rockstone

bruk dem one by one..(galang bwoy)
bruk dem 2 by 2...(galang bwoy)
Finga mash nuh bawl
memba ah play wi deh play...
Reposted from http://www.everytingjamaican.com/jamaicatalk/general-discussions/1753-ja... Re: Jamaican Folk Songs

-snip-

Here's another video of that song and its associated rock passing game:

Manuel Road vid 0001

Uploaded by axyswebs on Oct 6, 2009

****
EMMANUEL ROAD and MANGO TIME (Example #3)

Uploaded by pablowkingstoned on Feb 14, 2009

"Emmanuel Road & Mango Time - Jamaican Ring play or game song mento ......one of the best known jamaican song emmaneul road origanated as a ring play game or game song that involves the passing of heavy stones round a circle of sqating men this song has heard as a calypso and in many other versions rhe present recording shows in its orgiginal form , sung to the thudding rhythm of the stones being passed around the circle ......the second song Mango time is an exsample of countrey dance style called mento a hybrid sort of music with a rhythm rather more foursquare than that of spanisch influenced music such as trinidadian calypso .. the performing group includes harmonica coconut grater scraped with a spoon , wooden trumpet .(a bass instrument made from a hollow brach of the trumpet tree :)),bottles , pipe joints , and a knife tapped on a pickblade . the melody of mango time is obviously of brittish origan , almost certenly a sea song imported via the port of kingstone in the 19th century( it seems closey related to the liverpool song maggie may) but the style of playing is wholly jamaican ..........enjoy!!! this piece of history"

****
EMMANUEL ROAD (Example #4)
Mento Jamaican Folk Song : Girl & Boy

ChrisBentaAnderson,- retreived from YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3-9MotiUG4 , 10/25/2012
-snip-
A sound file of "Mandeville Road" is also found in the entry for "Hill And Gully Rider" below.

****
EVERY TIME SHE PASS (THE SANDPIPE SONG)

[partial lyrics)

Lead female - Every time I pass they trouble me.
Every time I pass they trouble me.
I’m gonna tell me Mamma don't send me down there.
[Men overlapping after the word “gonna”] – Tell she mama, don’t send she down here.
Lead female- I’m gonna tell me Mamma don't send me down there.
-snip-
Click this link to a post on my pancocojams blog for my full transcription of that song: http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/03/bajan-folk-song-every-time-she-p...

Additions & corrections are welcome.

Here's a video of a rendition of that song:

Every Time She Pass (The Standpipe Song) - Sing Out Barbados

bajanmusicfan,Published on Mar 13, 2012

Sweet Bajan Folk music from the 60's and 70's.

F

G, H
GIRL AND BWOY (BOY)
Examples of this Jamaican Mento song are posted under "Emmanuel Road"

GUYANA FOLK SONGS

Guyana Original Folk Songs Vol 02

Uploaded by boldthemdown on Oct 18, 2010

Editor: This is one of several videos available on YouTube of Guyana folk songs

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guyana:

"Guyana ..., officially the Cooperative Republic of Guyana,[1] previously known as British Guiana ... is a sovereign state on the northern coast of South America that is culturally part of the Anglophone Caribbean. Guyana has been a former colony of the Dutch and for over 200 years of the British. It is the only state of the Commonwealth of Nations on mainland South America, and it is also a member of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), which has its secretariat headquarters in Guyana's capital, Georgetown. Guyana achieved independence from the United Kingdom on 26 May 1966 and became a Republic on 23 February 1970."...

****
HILL AND GULLY (Example #1)
In a book called Mango Spice - 44 Caribbean songs chosen by Yvonne Conolly, Gloria Cameron and Sonia Singham, published by A & C Black of London, it gives the following:

(traditional Jamaican song)

Hill an gully rida,
(Hill an gully)
Hill an gully rida,
(Hill an gully)
An ah ben dung low dung,
(Hill an gully)
An a low dung bessy dung,
(Hill an gully)
Hill an gully rida,
(Hill an gully)
Hill an gully rida,
(Hill an gully)
An yu better mind you tumble dung,
(Hill an gully)
An yu tumble down yu bruk yu neck,
(Hill an gully)

The notes say Hill an Gully is a call and response song which used to be sung by workmen constructing new roads. In its topical way it refers to the uneven and hazardous terrain through which the new road had to be cut.

The response can be sung in unison or in two part harmony.

The thud of pick axes driven into the ground provided the accompaniment to the song... as the leader sang out his call, the pick axes were raised for the next downward swing.
- from http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9627#62847 Hill and Gully Riders - is there such a song?
-snip-
"An ah ben dung low dung" = "and I bend down low down
"An a low dung bessy dung" = and a [or "I"] low down bow down

****
HILL AND GULLY RIDER (Example #2)
Hill and Gully Ride; Mandeville Road [10 inch] - Lord Composer and his Silver Seas Hotel Orchestra

TheRealDJGIBS, Uploaded on Oct 2, 2011
Digital archive of MRS 78RPM single 31A;
Hill and Gully Ride; Mandeville Road by Lord Composer and His Silver Seas Hotel Orchestra
℗1954 Stanley Motta Ltd.

Style: Jamaican Mento
Composer: Traditional Jamaican Digging Songs
Label: MRS (Motta's Recording Studio)
Matrix No.: SM.117
-snip-
This is the first recorded version of "Hill And Gully Rider" (also known as "Gill and Gully" and "Hill And Gully Ride". The lyrics for this version of this song are:

HILL AND GULLY RIDE
(Lord Composer, 1954)

Hill an' gully rider
(Hill an' gully)
Hill an' gully rider
(Hill an' gully)

And then you bend down low now
(Hill an' gully)
And then you dance right round now
(Hill an' gully)
And if you broke your neck
you gonna to hell.
(Hill an' gully)
Hill an' gully rider
(Hill an' gully)
Hill an' gully rider
(Hill an' gully)
Hill an' gully rider
(Hill an' gully)

And then you bend down low now
(Hill an' gully)
And then you dance right round now
(Hill an' gully)
And then you bend down low now
(Hill an' gully)
And then you dance right round now
(Hill an' gully)
[instrumental]
Oh, ah hill an' gully rider
(Hill an' gully)
Hill an' gully rider
(Hill an' gully)

And then you bend down low now
(Hill an' gully)
And then you dance right round now
(Hill an' gully)
And then you bend down low now
(Hill an' gully)
And then you right see saw oh
And if you broke your neck
you gonna to hell.
(Hill an' gully)
Hill an' gully rider
(Hill an' gully)
Hill an' gully rider
(Hill an' gully)

And then me say you bend down low now
(Hill an' gully)
And then you dance right round now
(Hill an' gully)
Ah then you bend down low now
(Hill an' gully)
And then you dance right round
(Hill an' gully)

[instrumental]
-snip-
Transcription by Azizi Powell from this recording. Additions and corrections are welcome. Italics means that I'm not sure of those words. If those words are "And then you right see saw oh", the performance activity for those words might have been something like moving to the right, and then dancing up & down (because a see-saw" - which used to be a very widely found playground equipment that is now considered unsafe - goes up and down.

The "Mandeville Road" song begins at 1:44. The words to that song in the pattern of the standard words that are given for "Emmanuel Road" found below.

****
HILL AND GULLY RIDER & HOLD 'EM JOE (Example #3)

Uploaded by dancehallconnectcom on Sep 8, 2009
"Some more mento for the people, these are two of my favorite tracks first is hill and gully rider and then hold him joe. Enjoy!"

[Sorry, No information was posted about the group's name.]

****
HOG IN MY MINT TEA
Hog in my mint tea, him a root up me coco
Hog in my mint tea, him a root up me coco
One slice of breadfruit, two plate of ackee
One slice coconut, for me go rub it up to curry
All them young girls, when no have nobody
Visit bwoya, him no have no body. ["bwoya" = boy]
Hog in my mint tea, him a root up me coco
One slice of breadfruit, two plate of ackee
One slice coconut, for me go rub it up to curry
- From "Jamaica Mentos", traditional, arrangement by Lord Messam (posted on http://www.mentomusic.com/messam.htm#lyrics

****
HOLD 'EM JOE (Example #1)
A sound file of this Jamaican Mento song is combined with the song "Hill And Gully Rider) above.

****
HOLD 'EM JOE (Example #2)
Hold 'em Joe, hold'em Joe, hold'em Joe
But don't let him go
Hold 'em Joe, hold'em Joe, hold'em Joe
But don't let him go

Me donkey want water, hold'em Joe,
Spring 'round the corner, hold'em Joe
Me donkey want water, hold'em Joe
Everybody want water, hold'em Joe
Fuma la catchimba, hold'em Joe

We on a journey he don't walk straight
And that is because he's so underweight
Donkey of mine he don't like weight
Put him on a cart he never walk straight

Me donkey want water, hold'em Joe,
Spring 'round the corner, hold'em Joe
Me donkey want water, hold'em Joe
Everybody want water, hold'em Joe
Fuma la catchimba, hold'em Joe

My ole donkey went courtin' one day
With a donkey named Melda across the way
She was twice his age, he put up a fight
Now he's cryin' every night
Oh lemme go, darling Melda,
You breaking my back bone
Lemme go, darling Melda,
You breaking my back

Some people say that my donkey is bad
an' that is because he's from Trinidad
Donkey of mine he won't work at all
All he want to do is break out him stall
- lyrics posted at http://www.akh.se/lyrics/hold_em_joe.htm

Here's a sound file of this Jamaican Mento song:

My Donkey Want Water (Hold 'Em Joe) [10 inch] - Mac Beth, the Great

TheRealDJGIBS·, Uploaded on Jun 29, 2011

Digital archive of Musicraft 78RPM single 434;

My Donkey Want Water (Hold 'Em Joe) by Mac Beth, the Great with Gerald Clark and his Original Calypsos
℗1945 Guild/Musicraft Records
-snip-
Here are two comments from this sound file's comment thread: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSOkTAK2HEI

TheRealDJGIBS, 2013
For those who think Belafonte wrote this song... haha. It was first recorded in 1925 by Sam Manning (Columbia 2409-X) and while the original Columbia 78 credits Manning as the composer, it was a well known "Jamaican Digging Song".

****
Glenroy Joseph, 2013
in reply to TheRealDJGIBS
"Sam Manning was one of the earliest of the Trinidad calypsonians to gain international recognition in the early 20th century. The song may have been derived from a Jamaican digging song, but it is clearly period calypso, although there is a similarity to a Jamaican folk music called mento, "

****
J
JAMAICA FAREWELL
Down the way where the nights are gay
And the sun shines daily on the mountain top
I took a trip on a sailing ship
And when I reached Jamaica I made a stop

CHORUS:
But I'm sad to say, I'm on my way
Won't be back for many a day
My heart is down, my head is turning around
I had to leave a little girl in Kingston town

Sounds of laughter everywhere
And the dancing girls swaying to and fro
I must declare that my heart is there
Though I've been from Maine to Mexico

CHORUS

Down at the market you can hear
Ladies cry out while on their head they bear
Ackie rice and salt fish is nice
And the rum is good any time of year

CHORUS
-Irving Burgie (Lord Burgess); lyrics posted at http://www.arlo.net/resources/lyrics/jamaica-farewell.shtml

Here's a video of this Jamaican mento song:

Uploaded by arupc on Apr 11, 2008

Here's some information about Irving Burgie and this song from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamaica_Farewell
..."The lyrics for the song were written by Lord Burgess (Irving Burgie). Lord Burgess was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1926. His mother was from Barbados and his father was from Virginia. The song first appeared on Harry Belafonte's phenomenally successful album Calypso. It reached number fourteen on Billboard's Pop chart.

Though many, including Belafonte himself, have said that the song was popular in the West Indies since long before Burgess, it is believed that Burgess compiled and modified the song from many folk pieces to make a new song, and it is indubitable that it was Belafonte who popularised the song outside the Caribbean Islands. Burgess acknowledged his use of the tune of another calypso, "Iron Bar"."

****
JESSE MAHON (Also known as "Pack She Back To She Ma")

CHORUS
Pack she back to she ma,
Oh, pack she hack to she ma,
Such a decent girl like Jessie Mahon,
Pack she back to she ma.

1. A pretty little girl name Jessie Mahon,
She lazy since she born, .
De girl couldn’ cook, she won’ read a book,
So pack she back to she ma.

2. A pretty little girl like Jessie Mahon.
Uh miss she now she gone
De girl couldn’ clean, she was so mean.
So, pack she back to she ma

http://lyrics-of-barbados.webnode.com/products/jessie-mahon-pack-she-bac...

-snip-

Find a similar song above entitled "Bungo Moolatta".

Visit http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=138244&messages=32 "Big Big Sambo Lady" for more comments about songs similar to these songs.

Incidentally, "Sambo" was a Caribbean term for a person of Black/White ancestry.

Here are two renditions of "Jesse Mahon" by the St. Lucia National Youth Choir:

St Lucia National Youth Choir - Jessie Mahon

Uploaded by glnlake on Oct 13, 2007

Colors of Love Concert at Sandals Grande (2005)

**
St Lucia National Youth Choir - Jessie Mahon

Uploaded by STLUCIAYOUTHCHOIR on Jan 10, 2010

****
JUMP SHAMADOR
Good morning to you, Joseph.
Good morning to you, too
What is your intention?
I want to be a doctor.
You can't be a doctor.
I WILL be a doctor.
Well, jump shamador my, darling
Jump shamador, my dear
-Jamaican ring (circle) game; included in Cheryl Warren Mattox: Shake It To The One The You Love The Best; Play Songs And Lullabies From Black Musical Traditions (El Sobrante, California, Warren-Maddox Productions; 1986) p. 10

Editor: The game continues with the next player whose name is called. That player chooses a profession. Here's a description from that book:
"This song has an important message-if you believe in yourself, you can be whatever you want to be. Each player chooses a profession. When your name is called, go to the middle of the ring. Respond to the question -"What is your intention?"- by naming your choice of a profession. Show how determined you are by being forceful when you sing the line, "I WILL be a ____!".

Note that the phrase "jump shamador" is presented as the second verse to a version of "Brown Girl In The Ring" entitled "Black Boy In The Ring". That song and "Good Morning To You Mother" (which has very similar words as those given above) are included in Walter Jekyll's 1904 book Jamaican Song and Story. Lyrics from that book are posted on http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40845&messages=15 Lyr Req: jamaican folk music by Q on June 2011.

I'm unsure about the meaning of the word "shamador". "Shamador" might be a corruption [folk etymology] for "through the door" or "slam the door", but I'm just guessing about that.

****
K, L
LABEGA CAROUSEL [St. Croix, Virgin Island Quelbe song]
"The way in which quelbe lyrics were used to convey historical events is evident in a song entitled LaBega Carousel . By the early 1900s slavery had long since ended on St. Croix and jobs were scarce. The economy had drastically declined and living conditions were poor. The very popular song bears witness to the resulting labor unrest. The song proposes the boycott of a popular carousel owned by a man named LaBega, who said that laborers were not worthy of a pay raise. This song is still quite popular today."
http://www.jamesieproject.com/history.html

I rather walk and drink rum whole night
Before me go ride on LaBega Carousel
I rather walk, man, and drink rum whole night
Before me go ride on LaBega Carousel

I rather walk and drink rum whole night
Before me go ride on LaBega Carousel
I rather walk, man, and drink rum whole night
Before me go ride on LaBega Carousel

You no hear what LaBega say
"The people no worth more than fifteen cent a day"
You no hear what LaBega say, man
"The people no worth more than half cent a day"

I am walking, I am looking, I am begging
Before me go ride on LaBega Carousel
I am walking, I am looking, I am begging
Before me go ride on LaBega Carousel

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdnbULfZrCc "Joe Parris and the Hotshots - LaBega Carousel"

Here's a sound file of this song:
Joe Parris and the Hotshots - LaBega Carousel

Donald Turnbull, Uploaded on Dec 27, 2010

****
LIMBO
I want a woman to Limbo like me,
Limbo, to Limbo like me.
Limbo, Limbo, to Limbo like me,
Limbo, to Limbo like me.
I want a girl to Limbo like dis boy,
Limbo, to Limbo like me.
Limbo, Limbo, to Limbo like dis boy,
Limbo, Limbo like me.
I want a woman to Limbo like me,
Limbo, to Limbo like me.
De girl must be good to Limbo like dis boy,
Limbo, to Limbo like me.
Limbo, Limbo, to Limbo like me,
Limbo, to Limbo like me,
Limbo, Limbo, to Limbo like dis boy,
Limbo, to Limbo like me.
-Edric Connor, Songs from Trinidad, Oxford University Press, 1958.

Editor:
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limbo_(dance)
"Limbo is a popular form of contra dancing that originated on the island of Trinidad, though Hawaii is often mistakenly associated with limbo. The dancer moves to a Caribbean rhythm, then leans backward and dances under a horizontal pole without touching it. Upon touching it or falling backwards, the dancer is "out". When several dancers compete, they travel in single file, and the stick is gradually lowered until only one dancer — who has not touched either the pole or the floor — remains...

Consistent with certain African beliefs, the dance reflects the whole cycle of life".[1] "The dancers move under a pole that is gradually lowered from chest level, and they emerge on the other side, as their heads clear the pole, as in the triumph of life over death".[1] This dance is also used as a funeral dance and may be related to the African legba or legua dance.[2]"

-snip-
Here is information from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papa_Legba:
"In Haitian Vodou, Papa Legba is the intermediary between the loa and humanity. He stands at a spiritual crossroads and gives (or denies) permission to speak with the spirits of Guinee, and is believed to speak all human languages. He is always the first and last spirit invoked in any ceremony, because his permission is needed for any communication between mortals and the loa - he opens and closes the doorway[1]. In Haiti, he is the great elocution, the voice of God, as it were. Legba facilitates communication, speech and understanding. In the Yoruba pantheon, honored in Nigeria, Cuba, Brazil, and elsewhere in the Yoruba diaspora, Ellegua is mostly associated with Papa Legba since both share the role of being the god of the crossroads. In contrast to Papa Legba, however, Eleggua is a trickster child. Legba also shares similarities to Orunmila, the orisha of prophesy who taught mankind how to use the mighty oracle Ifá. He usually appears as an old man on a crutch or with a cane, wearing a broad brimmed straw hat and smoking a pipe, or sprinkling water. "

-snip-

Here are links to two videos of the Elegba dance. Note that the two dances are different. This may be because the dances are from different populations/religions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vhof9Spb6es&feature=related
Legba dance
Uploaded by exu6 on Oct 11, 2007
a dance for the old Papa

-snip-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vhof9Spb6es&feature=related
Elegba Dance

Uploaded by ronzta on Jul 21, 2007
Song and Dance for Orisha Elegba from the 17th annual African Street

****
LINSTEAD MARKET (Example #1)
Mi carry mi ackee go a Linstead Market
Not a quattie worth sell
Mi Carry me ackee go a Linstead Market
Not a quattie worth sell

Lord what night, not a bite
What a Saturday night
Lawd what a night not a bite
What a Saturday night

Everybody come feel up, feel up
Not a quattie worth sell
Everybody come feel up, feel up
Not a quattie worth sell

Lord what night, not a bite
What a Saturday night
Lawd what a night not a bite
What a Saturday night

Do mi mommy nuh beat mi kill mi
Sake a Merry-go-round
Do mi mommy don’t beat me kill
Sake a American rum

Lord what night, not a bite
What a Saturday night
Lawd what a night not a bite
What a Saturday night

All di pickney dem a linga linga
Fi weh dem mumma no bring
All di pickney dem a linga linga
Fi weh dem mumma no bring

Lawd, what a night, not a bite
What a Satiday night
Lawd, what a night, not a bite
How di pickney gwine feed?
- reposted from http://www.everytingjamaican.com/jamaicatalk/general-discussions/1753-ja...

Here's a video that provides some explanation about this song:

Uploaded by yourjamaica on May 26, 2009

"Jamaican original folk music from the jolly Boys, Mento 'Linstead market'."

****
LINSTEAD MARKET (Example #2)

Lord Flee & Jamaican Calypsonians - Linstead Market (Mento)

****
LONG TIME GAL (Example #1)
Dis long time, gal, me never see yu,
Come mek me hol your han.
Dis long time, gal, me never see yu,
Come mek me hol your han.
Peel head John Crow sid upon tree-top
Pick off de blossom,
Mek me hold your han, gal, mek me hol
your han.

Dis long time, gal, me never see yu,
Come mek we walk and talk.
Dis long time, gal, me never see yu,
Come mek we walk and talk.
Peel head John Crow

Dis long time, gal, me never see yu,
Come mek we wheel an turn.
Dis long time gal, me never see yu,
Come let me wheel an turn.
Peel head John Crow

Mek we wheel an turn till we tumble dung,
Mek me hol your han, gal.
Mek we wheel an till we tumble dung,
Mek me hol your han, gal.

Reposted from http://www.unlockingthearchives.rgs.org/themes/journeys/gallery/resource...

Also, click http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=2856&c=113 for similar words and a standard American English "translation" of those words.
-snip-
http://www.golocaljamaica.com/readarticle.php?ArticleID=784

The John Crow - Graceful or Disgraceful Bird
(Apr-22-2003)
John Crow, the common Jamaican vulture, was once widely known as a carrion crow or turkey vulture. In towns and throughout the countryside, these birds can be seen tearing at carcasses in the streets. Sometimes they circle in the sky or simply perch in trees or on housetops, often with outspread wings.
-snip-

"Peel headed" means "bald head", "The Caribbean's "John Crow" doesn't mean the same thing as the USA's "Jim Crow". Read notes to "One Solja Man" below for more information about the meaning of "John Crow" in the Caribbean.

Here's a video of "Long Time Gal":

uploaded by BajanBloom on Jan 13, 2011

"Miss Lou -- Dr. Louise Bennett Coverley has made a distinguished contribution to the development of Arts and Culture in both in Jamaica and the Caribbean region at large. Through her skillfully penned prose in Jamaican patois, Miss Lou has been able to raise the folk dialect to an art level now accepted and appreciated by all Jamaicans."

****
DIS LONG TIME GAL (Example #2)

Uploaded by NexusPAC on Jun 7, 2009

"Nexus Performing Arts Company Performing @ the Alps in Austria, July 2008"
(Kingston, Jamaica)

M, N
MANGO TIME
Mi nuh drink coffee, tea -mango time
Care how nice it may be -mango time
In the heat of the mango crop
When di fruit dem a ripe an drop
Wash your pot turn dem down -mango time

De terpentine large an fine, -mango time
Robin mango so sweet, mango time
Number eleven an hairy skin
Pack di bankra an ram dem in
For di bankra mus' full, mango time

Mek wi go a mango walk, mango time
For is only di talk mango time
Mek wi jump pon di big jackass
Ride im dung an no tap a pass
Mek di best a di crop, mango time
- Reposted from http://www.jamaicans.com/culture/folk/mangot.shtml
-snip-
nuh- no
turpentine, robin mango and number eleven = types of mango
bankra = a big basket
mek wi go = make we go (but probably means "I'll go")
im= him
dung = down
no tap a pass = I think this means "don't fail to reach up and grab some mangos when you are passing under the trees"

Here's a video that includes a medley of Jamaican folk songs including "Mango Time":

Uploaded by prophet2005 on May 7, 2010
Tribute to Miss Lou (Louise Bennett)

****
MANGO WALK (Example #1)
Mi breda did a tell yuh nuh fe go mango walk
go mango walk
go mango walk
Mi breda did a tell yuh nuh fe go mango walk
go mango walk
go mango walk

An nuh pick up the number 11
Tell mi joe do tell mi joe
Tell mi joe do tell mi
Tell mi joe do tell mi joe
Why you pick up the number 11

Mi breda did a tell yuh nuh fe go mango walk
go mango walk
go mango walk
Mi breda did a tell yuh nuh fe go mango walk
go mango walk
go mango walk

An nuh pick up the number 11
Tell mi joe do tell mi joe
Tell mi joe do tell mi
Tell mi joe do tell mi joe
Why you pick up the number 11
- reposted from http://www.everytingjamaican.com/jamaicatalk/general-discussions/1753-ja...
-snip-
"mango walk" - a mango orchard
From http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/forum/956.html , masato sakurai, Posted - 02 Dec 07
"From Webster's Third New International Dictionary:
walk n 14: a West Indian plantation of trees arranged in rows with wide spaces between them "

**
Number 11 - a type of mango [various sources including http://wwwchem.uwimona.edu.jm:1104/lectures/mango.html "Jamaican Mangos"

**
pick up - steal

****
MANGO WALK (Example #2)
The woman never tell me say you go mango walk,
you go mango walk, you go mango walk
The woman never tell me say you go mango walk,
you pick up the Number Eleven
Beg you tell me the reason why,
Beg you tell me the reason why,
Beg you tell me the reason why,
You pick up the Number Eleven
-from "Jamaica Mentos", traditional, arrangement by Lord Messam (lyrics posted on http://www.mentomusic.com/messam.htm Lord Messam ; Last revised: 12/29/06
-snip-
"Beg tell me the reason why" - Please tell me the reason why

****
MANGO WALK (Example #3)
cho: My brother did a-tell me that you go mango walk,
You go mango walk, you go mango walk,
My brother did a-tell me that you go mango walk
And steal all the number 'leven.

Now tell me, Joe, do tell me for true,
Do tell me for true, do tell me,
That you don't go to no mango walk
And steal all the number 'leven.

I tell you, Sue, I tell you for true,
I tell you for true, I tell you
That I don't go to no mango walk
And steal all the number 'leven.

Recorded by John Langstaff on "Let's Make Music." From Jamaica.
A "mango walk" is an orchard, and "Number Eleven" is a variety of
fruit. RW
The tune has been a steel-band staple for at least the last
thirty-five years. I suspect that number 'leven refers to the
fruit's size, rather than it's variety. RG

****
MAN SMART WOMAN SMARTER (Example #1)

Uploaded by badmanelias on Feb 18, 2010

"Classic calypso from Norman Spann aka King Radio"

****
MAN SMART WOMAN SMARTER (Example #2)
(Harry Belafonte version)

I say let us put man and a woman together
To find out which one is smarter
Some say man but I say no
The woman got the man de day should know

And not me but the people they say
That de man are leading the women astray
But I say, that the women of today
Smarter than the man in every way
That’s right de woman is uh smarter
That’s right de woman is uh smarter
That’s right de woman is uh smarter, that’s right, that’s right

Ever since the world began
Woman was always teaching man
And I you listen to my bid attentively
I goin’ tell you how she smarter than me

Samson was the strongest man long ago
No one could a beat him, as we all know
Until he clash with Deliah on top of the bed
She told them all the strength was in the hair of his head

You meet a girl at a pretty dance
Thinking that you would stand a chance
Take her home, thinking she’s alone
Open de door you find her husband home

I was treating a girl independently
She was making baby for me
When de baby born and I went to see
Eyes was blue it was not by me

Garden of Eden was very nice
Adam never work in Paradise
Eve meet snake, Paradise gone
She make Adam work from that day on

Methusaleh spent all his life in tears
Lived without a woman for 900 years
One day he decided to have some fun
The poor man never lived to see 900 and one
- from http://www.lyricstime.com/harry-belafonte-man-smart-woman-smarter-lyrics...

Here's a recording of Harry Belafonte singing this King Radio song:

****
MANUEL ROAD
Examples of this Jamaican song are posted under "Emmanuel Road"

MARY ANN

Lyr. Add: Mary Ann (Marian)
Lord Lebby, Montego Beach Hotel

All day and all night, Miss Mary Ann
She was sitting by the wayside sieving sand
When the water from her eye could fill a boat
And the hair around her head skull it couuld hang a goat.

That's why we love her so
That's why we love her so
That's why we love her so
She's the gal named Mary Ann
(Repeat four lines)

Why do all the boys love Mary Ann?
Why do all the boys love Mary Ann?
It's because she can dance like no one can
That's why all the boys love Mary Ann.
Mary Ann she love to dance
And she give each boy a chance
If the boy don't dance so well
Mary Ann would not be swell

Now all the boys love Mary Ann
Now all the boys love Mary Ann
It's because she can kiss like no one can,
That's why all the boys love Mary Ann.

That's why we love her so
That's why we love her so
That's why we love her so
She's the gal named Mary Ann
(Repeat four lines)

Typescript with souvenir LP, Montego Beach Hotel, Calypso Band, Lord Lebby, vocalist, 1950s.

http://www.mentomusic.com/images/LLL_MaryAnn.jpg ; posted on http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9916&messages=27by Q. May 30, 2011

Here's a version of this song:

Roaring Lion - Mary Ann (original)
Uploaded by badmanelias on Feb 18, 2010
"The classic Mary Ann by The Roaring Lion. I consider this one of the most famous calypsoes of all time and one which deserves to be on youtube... Classic Lion!"

****
MATILDA (Example #1)
Oh, Lord, Matilda,
Believe me, friends, it's Matilda,
What a dizzy call!
Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela
(Everybody!)

Chorus
Matilda- Look, oh Lord,
Matilda- dizzy call,
Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela

It really hurt me, friends, but what's to do?
Now listen what the woman do to you.
(Mow dat water), Matilda, she take me money and gone (run) Venezuela

Chorus

So never me friends to love again,
Now listen all me money gone in vain.
(Oh look, oh Lord), it's Matilda that take me money and gone Venezuela

Five thousand dollars friends I lost,
The woman even sell me cart and horse!
(Oh Lord), Matilda she take me money and gone Venezuela

Chorus

The money was to buy a house an' lan',
Now listen as she draft a serious plan,
(Fire! Water!) Matilda she take me money and gone Venezuela

Well the money was right inside me bed,
Stuck up in the mattress right below me head,
Oh lord, this is Matilda that take me money and gone Venezuela

I feel a jumbie shove me head,
He said "Boy, no money inside your bed,
(Look, oh Lord), Matilda she take your money and gone Venezuela."
Chorus

Where I put my hand was all in vain,
Right on the spot, I got a serious stain,
(Mow that water?), Matilda she take me money and gone Venezuela
-King Radio (Norman Spann) from YouTube video (transcription by Guest,MorwenEdhelwen1 on http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8026 Matilda, Matilda (from Harry Belafonte) April 13, 2011

Here's the YouTube sound file of King Radio singing his composition "Matilda" that was the source for the above transcription

Uploaded by CanchozI on Feb 4, 2009

King Radio (Norman Span) - Mathilda (Matilda)

****
MATILDA (Example #2)
(As sung by the Duke of Iron)

Oh lord, it is Matilda,
Believe me friends, it's Matilda,
What a dizzy call!
Matilda, she take my money and run Venezuela.

Everybody!
(Chorus: Matilda, what a dizzy call!
Matilda, Lord I got to fall,
Matilda, she take my money and run Venezuela)

Five thousand dollars, friends, I lost,
The woman even sell me cart and horse,
Oh Lord, Matilda, she take my money and run Venezuela.

Everybody!
(Chorus)

Well the money was to buy me house and land,
Then she draft a serious plan,
Oh Lord, Matilda, she take my money and run Venezuela.
(Chorus)
Well the money was just inside me bed,
Stuck up in the mattress right below me head,
Don't you know that Matilda done find me money and run Venezuela?
(Instrumental break)

Well I feel a jumbie shove me head,
He said, "Boy, no money inside your bed:
Don't you know that Matilda done take your money and run Venezuela?"
Everybody!
(Chorus)

When I put my hand was all in vain,
On the spot I got a serious stain,
Oh Lord I mean, Matilda she take me money and run with Invader.
Everybody!
(Chorus)
So never me friends to love again,
Because all me money gone in vain,
Oh Lord, Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.
Everybody!
(Chorus : Play it out boys. Instrumental break.)
-King Radio; transcription (source not noted) by MorwenEdhelwen1 on http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8026 Matilda, Matilda (from Harry Belafonte) May 20, 2011

****
MATILDA (Example #3)
(As sung by Harry Belafonte)

Hey! Matilda, Matilda, Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.
Once again now!
Matilda, Matilda, Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.
Five hundred dollars, friends, I lost:
Woman even sell me cat and horse!
Heya! Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.

Everybody!
(Matilda,) Sing out the chorus,
(Matilda,) Sing a little louder,
Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.
Once again now!
(Matilda,) Going 'round the corner,
(Matilda,) Sing out the chorus,
Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.
Well, the money was to buy me house an' lan'
Then she got a serious plan,
A-hey, ah!

Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.
Everybody!
(Matilda,
Matilda,
Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.)
Once again now!
(Matilda,) Going 'round the corner,
(Matilda,
Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.)
Well, the money was just inside me bed,
Stuck up in a pillow beneath me head.
Don't you know,
Matilda, she found me money and...

Everybody...
(Matilda,
Matilda,
Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.)
Once again now!
(Matilda,) Hooma locka chimba,
(Matilda,) Bring me little water,
Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.
Women over forty?
(Matilda,
Matilda,
Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.)

Everybody!
(Matilda,) Goin' round the corner,
(Matilda,) Bring me little water,
Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.
Well, me friends, never to love again,
All me money gone in vain!
Uh, heya...
Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.

Everybody!
(Matilda,
Matilda,) Oom, ba-locka-chimba!
(Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.)
Sing a little softer!
(Matilda,
Matilda,
Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela.)

EVERYBODY!
(Matilda,
Matilda,) Sing out the chorus!
Matilda, she take me money and run Venezuela!
-Harry Belafonte recording of "Matilda"; lyrics posted on summary of http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uEuFFoiOMs0

****
MEDLEY OF TURKS & CAICOS ISLAND FOLK SONGS
BOW WOW WOW
Bow wow wow my dog gon’ bite you
Bow wow wow my dog gon’ bite you
Throw the water in the door
So the door can’t make no noise
Bow wow wow my dog gon’ bite you

WENT JAMAICA
Went Jamaica spend my holiday
Went Jamaica spend my holiday
They give me ripe banana
They give me green banana
They give me coconut water
Spend my holiday

SEND HER HOME
Big, big sambo gal
She can’t wash, she can’t cook
Send her home to her mama gal
The gal can’t wash and the gal can’t cook
Send her home to her mama
- David Bowen, Cultural Officer, Turks & Caicos Tourist Board ; Rediscovery the Hidden Culture- Folk Songs; http://www.timespub.tc/2002/06/rediscovering-the-hidden-culture-folk-songs/ (Turks & Caicos Islands) ; posted summer 2002; retrieved June 2, 2011

Here's infomation from David Bowen about how these songs were sung:
"The structures of our folk songs are simple and usually last for one verse and are then repeated over and over. This works well during ring play games where each person in the circle gets a turn to dance and sing in the ring. However, to break up the monotony in a dance and party setting, several songs are woven together in a medley and can go on for hours, switching from song to song supported by hand clapping and a ripsaw rhythm section. The Providenciales branch of the Senior Citizens Club, organized by Mrs. Marion Williams, taught four tunes to me that can be woven together in such a medley, jumping from one topic to another without missing a beat."

-snip-

Click that link for more lyrics to and more information about Turks & Caicos folk songs.

****
MI COFFEE

Old Harbour High performs "Mi Coffee" on All Together Sing 2010

Uploaded by pussjook on Nov 1, 2010

Old Harbour High [Jamaica] performs "Mi Coffee" on All Together Sing 2010

****
MOON SHINE TONIGHT
Moon shine tonight come mek we dance and sing
Moon shine tonight come mek we dance and sing

Mi deh rock so
You deh rock so
Under banyan tree
Mi deh rock so
You deh rock so
Under banyan tree

Ladies may curts and gentleman may bow
Ladies may curts and gentleman may bow

Mi deh rock so
You deh rock so
Under banyan tree
Mi deh rock so
You deh rock so
Under banyan tree

Come we join hands and mek we dance around and sing
Come we join hands and mek we dance around and sing

Mi deh rock so
You deh rock so
Under banyan tree
Mi deh rock so
You deh rock so
Under banyan tree
- reposted from http://www.everytingjamaican.com/jamaicatalk/general-discussions/1753-ja...

****
MY DONKEY WANTS WATER
Read entries for "Hold'em Joe" above .

****
NINE NIGHT (A Medley Of Songs) (Part 1)

Uploaded by podimusicus on Jun 4, 2008

"Watch this parodied dramatization of the Jamaican 'Nine Night' where relatives, friends, neighbours and even strangers come together to comfort each other after the death of a loved one. It is now the culminating ninth night and even the blesséd mournful must eat and ,especially, drink."

-snip-
A post on this video's comment thread indicates that this performance probably was in 2002.

Here's an excerpt from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nine_nights about Nine Night:

"Nine-Nights is a funerary tradition practiced in the Caribbean (primarily Jamaica and Guyana). It is an extended wake that lasts for several days, with roots in African tradition. During this time, friends and family come together to the home of the deceased. They share their condolences and memories while singing hymns and eating food together. In the old days, the nights were calm and reserved for the most part - but that tradition has changed with the times. Today, these gatherings resemble parties much more than they resemble wakes (though this is not true for all “nine-nights”).

Nine-Nights are no longer a time to mourn but a time to celebrate since the loved one is no longer suffering in life. When friends come they do not come with just condolences they come with food, drink and music; this is after all a celebration. True to its name this celebration lasts nine nights and days with the ninth and final night being the night before the church service. On the ninth night the family prepares the food for all who come. As tradition has is on the ninth night it is believed that the spirit of the deceased passes through the party gathering food and saying goodbye before continuing on to its resting place. Out of all the nights this night is the most revered since it is the end of the celebration. Stories about the deceased and the fondest memories are shared, along with prayers. Games, such as Dominos, are played as well as singing hymns, which is also done on the other nights as well."...

-snip-
Click my blog post http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/08/jamaican-nine-nights-wakes-music... for more information and videos on Jamaican Nine Nights.

****
NINE NIGHT (A Medley Of Songs) (Part 2)

Uploaded by podimusicus on Jun 4, 2008

Editor:
Several commenters to this video's thread explained why the audience laughs at one point. The lead singer names Captain's Bread. a popular Jamaican bakery and mentions "junking the bread". Here's what one commenter wrote:
"Is not 'chunk' dem seh...is 'junk'. And I do remember my mother rebuking us boys (and me especially) about "junking' de bread when wi cut off one big rahtid 'slice' an it lean no hell.
-LoveMusicBad; 2009

O, P
ONE SOLJA MAN
Verse 1
One solja man come fe court me,
Me sey me no ha' nobody,
Him gimme one shillin' an' quatty.
Me tek i' buy silk an' satin.

Verse 2
Me wash i' me starch i' me iron i',
Me pred i' pon pingwing macka,
An one ole un-conscionable John Crow*
Come fling i' eena crevice an' corner.

Verse 3
No tear i' Jeremiah, no tear i',
No tear i' Jeremiah, no tear i',
No tear i' Jeremiah, no tera i',
No tear up me silk an' satin.

Verse 4
A weh yuh dah weel an' tun me,
A weh yuh dah weel an' tun me,
Yuh mussa wan' me fe go fall dung,
An' lick me belly pon tambourina.

Solja- Soldier
Ha'- Have
Quatty- Penny halfpenny
Pred- Spread
Pingwing macka- Cactus
John Crow- Jamaican scavenger bird, but here used in a derogatory sense, alluding to 'Jeremiah'.
Eena- In
Weh- Why
Mussa- Must
Fe go fall dung- To fall down
Tambourina- Tambourine

Also sung as 'One Bungo Man', Bungo meaning an African.
*May be sung as: 'Him gimme one cock-y'eye fourbit', 'fourbit' being one shilling and sixpence.

Pp. 58-59, With music for voice and piano.

Tom Murray, Ed. and arr., 1951, Folk Songs of Jamaica, Oxford University Press.

-snip-

These lyrics & notes were posted on http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40845 by Q on October 4, 2011.

"One Solja Man” is a Mento from Jamaica. The composer of this old Caribbean song is unknown

With regard to the name "John Crow":
From http://www.golocaljamaica.com/readarticle.php?ArticleID=784
"The John Crow is a bird of great symbolic importance. In the Jamaican setting it is associated with ugliness, blackness, evil and disgrace. In abusive arguments people will call each other names such as "dirty John Crow, black John Crow or heng man John Crow". The John Crow is also an omen of death. It is believed that if the John Crow perches on a housetop, someone inside will die. It is also believed that if a John Crow appears in an individual's dream, it signifies death or some other form of destruction in the person's family."
-snip-
In Jamaican tradition "John Crow" is commonly referred to as a "disgraceful" bird. Read the notes under the song "Long Time Gal". The adjective "unconscionable" means the same thing as "disgraceful".

In the context of this song, "John Crow" in this song is used as a derogatory referent to a dark skinned Black man,The phrase "An one ole un-conscionable John Crow" doubles down the derogatory meaning of the description (an unconscionable dark skinned Black man"). That meaning is substantiated by the note that the song is also sung as "One Bungo Man", Bungo meaning "an African." Also, read the notes for the song "Bungo Moolatta" given above.

**
With regard to the verse "No tear i Jeremiah":

In the song "One Solja Man" the lyrics
"No tear i' Jeremiah, no tera i'/ No tear up me silk an' satin" seem to clearly have the meaning "Jeremiah, don't cause me to tear [cut] my silk and satin dress. As to how the woman in the song might cut her dress, the subsequent verse has her cautioning Jeremiah not to wheel & turn her so fast on the dance floor. My mainstream American English translation of that verse is:

"Don't wheel & turn me [spin me around] so fast Jeremiah. You mustn't want me to fall down and hit my belly on the tamborine [or, more generally speaking "on the dance floor"]. The word "tear" may have purposely been used for its meaning of "tearing" [racing] around - in the context of the song "wheeling and turning" [spinning fast] around the dance floor.

That said, it’s also my position that the "no tear I Jeremiah" lyrics are an adaptation - albeit for a different purpose and with a different meaning- of the words of Jeremiah 9, verses 1-18. Here are two verses from that chapter:

Jeremiah 9:1 - 1 "Oh, that my eyes were a fountain of tears; I would weep forever! I would sob day and night for all my people who have been slaughtered"

Jeremiah 9:18 - 18 "Quick! Begin your weeping! Let the tears flow from your eyes"

-snip-
Because of those verses and other verses in that book of the Bible, "Jeremiah" is now known as the "weeping prophet".

I found those verses and other verse of Jeremiah 9 to be particularly poignant in the context of the horrific massacre of movie attendees that occurred on July 20, 2012 in Aurora, Colorado.

-snip-

Here's a video of One Solja Man:

Jamaican Folk Song/ The Carifolk Singers

****
PEELED HEADED JOHN CROW
Verses found in "Long Time Gal"

****
Q, R
RUKUMBINE
Examples of Rukumbine, "Requimbine" and "Rookoombine" are posted together regardless of the spelling of that word.

RUKUMBINE (Example #1)
Good morning Mother Cuba
'Ow do you do?
Me ear seh you buy one new pair o' shoes
Me ear seh you buy one new brand hat
Mother Cuba tell me how much you pay for that hat?

Then a Rukumbine in a me san tom pee
Rukumbine
I seh Rukumbine in a me san tom pee
Rukumbine

Me seh the higher the hill
The greener the grass
The younger the gal
Is the sweeter she kiss

Then a Rukumbine in a me san tom pee
Rukumbine
I seh Rukumbine in a me san tom pee
Rukumbine

I said, engine a run
With fire and coal,
Look 'pon the gal
With the big nose hole

Then a Rukumbine in a me san tom pee
Rukumbine
I seh Rukumbine in a me san tom pee
Rukumbine

Girl in a tree
Pick her ackee
Boy underneath
A wash in khaki pants?

Then a Rukumbine in a me san tom pee
Rukumbine
I seh Rukumbine in a me san tom pee
Rukumbine

Written by Shenley Duffus [1965]
Recorded by Shenley Duffus (Island WI186)
Produced by King Edwards
Transcribed by OBSERVER STATION
Reposted from:
http://snwmf.com/phorum/read.php?1,247884,247884

Here's a video of this song:

Uploaded by prosperous101 on Aug 12, 2009

Editor:
This version of Rukumbine was written by Shenley Duffus. However, this ska song is documented to come from a Jamaican children's song.

It's possible that "Mother Cuba" could refer to a woman whose name is "Cuba". The female day name "Cuba" is recorded from the 18th century Jamaica or earlier. This name comes from the Akan [Ghana, Ivory Coast, West Africa] tradition of conferring female or male names based on day a person was born. http://www.aren.org/prison/documents/african/14/14.pdf [ Anansi Stories - notes for #146 "The Cumbolo"] provides a complete list of Jamaican day names. Included in that list is "Cubena" - male born on Tuesday and "Cuba" - female born on Tuesday.

Click http://www.twi.bb/akan-names.php for a complete list of Akan day names, including the listing for male born on Tueday ("Kwabena". -variants given "Ebo, Kobby, Kobina, Komla") and female born on Tuesday ("Abenaa" - variants given "Abena, Abla, Abrema".

The Akan female name for "female born on Wednesday" is "Akua". One variant of the name "Akua" is "Akuba". In my opinion, "Akuba" is the most likely earliest source for the Jamaican female name "Cuba".

Of course, the name "Mother Cuba" which appears in the Jamaican song "Rukumbine" (and according to several blog discussions, in some other [though unfortunately unnamed by those bloggers] Mento songs), could just mean "a woman from Cuba."

-snip-

Here's a response from Stamina! to a question about the meaning of the word "rukumbine" which was posted on http://snwmf.com/phorum/read.php?1,247884,247884 :
"It's a Jamaican children's song changed to be double-entendre slackness, from what my yardie expert tells me. 'Rukumbine' ('recombine') was a codeword for sex.

The original was not "the sweeter the kiss" as in this version but rather rhymes much better with 'the greener the grass'. (cf. I Roy's "Welding" Gal in a tree/a pick her ackee/while underneat' ya wash dem khaki (cocky?)...

It's a great rollicking piece of countrified ska."

-snip-

And here's a comment from http://mobile.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20100919/cleisure/cleisure3.php "Mama Lou, a di Ragamuffin" by Carolyn Cooper, Contributor

"An one lady cite de case of words in Jamaica folk songs, an she seh dat 'Rookoombine' was a indeestant wud when she was a lickle pickney, an she woulda did get a bad beatin if she did ever dare sing 'Rookoombine' meck her parents hear, but now 'Rookoombine' is a very good folk-song dat everybody can sing anywhere widout any worries, so dat show dat Jamaica people like change de meanin a words."

****
RUKUMBINE (Version #2)
Let me break it down 4 ya. My father used to sing this all the time and I found out later that it was a Jamaican nursery rhyme madeover "slackly". "Rukumbine" is really to "recombine" or have sexual intercourse. The real original lyrics are:

Saturday a day fi cook pepa pot, mama cuba come a yard and ask a wah dat? Me tell her say me nyam pon a ole cow fat, she say she never nyam nuttin sweet like-a-dat, me say rukumbine in a me..... Rukumbine in a me ......Rukumbine

(which translates as, Saturday is the day that I make a special dish, mama cuba (a Cuban lady) comes over and asks what's he cooking. He tells her it's only old cow fat in a pepper pot and she says she's never tasted something so good. he tells her Rucumbine, meaning I mixed up the old with the new...

Next verse:

Good morning matha cuba and how do you do, me hear say you buy, one new pair a shoe, me hear say you buy a dandy hat, mama cuba tell me how much you pay fah dat, then me recombine...
(Self explanitory...
He compliments her and then sleeps with her...)

The higher the hill, the greener the grass
The younger the girl the sweeter "the ass" (not she kiss)

Oh, and "ina me santampi," means nothing...he's just filling the space where it should be a dirty word...u figure it out...

That's the best I got for you! Hope it helped...
-Anonymous, http://ill-function.livejournal.com/69000.html Re: rukumbine lyrics, onymous
November 16 2009

****
REQUIMBINE (Example #3)

The Jolly Boys - Requimbine

The Jolly Boys - Requimbine - at Spectra - AmerImage - 60 min production
Uploaded by valeriocool on Sep 12, 2008

Click http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Jolly_Boys to find information about this very well respected Jamaican mento group who began performing in 1955.

****
ROOKUMBINE (Example #4)

Nexus Performing Arts Company

Uploaded by NexusPAC on Jun 23, 2009

Nexus Performing Arts Company in the Folk Category singing "Rookumbine" at the 5th World Choir Games in Graz, Austria July 2008
(Kingston, Jamaica)

****
RUM AND COCA COLA
(composed by Lord Invader)

And when the Yankees first went to Trinidad,
Some of the young girls were more than glad,
They said that the Yankees treat them nice,
And they give them a better price.

Chorus.
They buy rum and Coca-Cola,
Went (going) down Point Cumana,
Both mothers and daughters,
Working for their Yankee dollars (repeated)

Ah, look I had a little chick the other day,
But her mother came and took her away,
Herself, her mother and her sisters,
Went in a cab with some soldiers. (Chorus)

Chorus sings:
Rum and Coca-Cola,
Go down Point Cumana.

They have some aristos*
in Port of Spain,
I know a lot, but I won't call name,
And in the day they wouldn't give you a right*
But you might see them with the foreigners late at night,
drinking (chorus)

I know a couple who got married one afternoon,
And was to go Miami on their honeymoon,
But the bride run away with a soldier lad,
And the stupid husband went staring mad. (Chorus)

*aristo- aristocrat or rich person. * right- from right hand; handshake on a deal, i. e., wouldn't traffic with the local people (distinctions based on degree of color and money were very strong in island communities).

Remarks by Lord Invader: "Diplomatically you ask me what is calypso, Mr. Lomax? Calypso is folklore of Trinidad, a style of poetry telling about current events in song.

With regard to the song "Rum and Coca-Cola," you want to ask me how I happened to compose it, Mr. Lomax? (laughter) Ladies and Gentlemen, back home in the West Indies- Trinidad- where I'm from- I'm from a small island. I'm proud of it, thank you! I was traveling on a bus to some place they call Point Cumana, bathing resort, and I happened to see the GIs since the American social invasion in the West Indies, Trinidad. (laughter) You know the girls used to get their candies and stuff like that and they go to the (laughter), they go to the canteens with the boys and so on, have fun. So I notice since the GIs came over there that we generally chase with soda, ordinary soda. But they chaser was rum and coke; they drink rum, and they like the Coca-Cola as a chaser. So I studied that as an idea of song, and Morey Amsterdam had the nerve to say that he composed that song back here (laughter).

Thank you, ladies and gentlemen. And I am going to sing you "Rum and Coca-Cola" for my first number. Thank You." "

From Booklet notes with the cd "Calypso at Midnight," a "Midnight Special" concert at Town Hall, New York City, 1946.
Introductions by Alan Lomax.

NOTE- Since the case was not yet settled, Rounder Records still cited the song "Morey Amsterdam, Paul Baron, Jerry Sullivan. CPP/Belwin."
Rounder 11661-1840-2.
- from http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=66111 posted by Q on February 21, 2004

Here's a sound file of that song:

Uploaded by calypzombie85 on Oct 1, 2009
"Lord Invader - Rum and coca cola"

****
RUN GRANNY RUN

calypso girl

Posted lordzombie; July 15, 2006
";i took this video from a japanese documentary made in the 80's it features music class in an all girls school in trinidad. I have no other information about it, except the DVD rocks...if you are really into vintage calypso"

Editor
In this excerpt of a USA documentary on Calyso "One Hand Don't Clap", a young Calypsonian school girl (Natasha Wilson) and other girls sing a calypso song about Granny Lucez. a marathon runner that kept running 5ks and marathons till her late 80s.

Natasha Wilson was famous for her Calypso singing in the 1980s.

Click http://www.jambalayah.com/node/174 to find this video and an edited version of its viewer comment thread.

S, T
SLY MONGOOSE (Example #1)
"This song, wellknown throughout the Caribbean is not really about the mongoose. In fact, the animal and its character is used to allude to sexual liaisons between the master of the house and the cook or between the mistress and a worker.

Sly Mongoose, all them dogs they know your name
Oh yes, sly mongoose, all them dogs they know your name
You went into the mistress kitchen
Take out one of the fattest chickens
Put it into your waistcoat pocket
sly mongoose. "
- from http://www.dramonline.org/content/notes/nwr/80427.pdf "Zoop Zoop Zoop: Traditional Music And Folklore of St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John" (New World Records 80427-2)

Here's a sound file of this song:

Lord Invader- "Sly Mongoose"
Uploaded by kaiso22 on Mar 24, 2009

****
RUN MONGOOSE (Example #2 of Sly Mongoose)
Chorus:
Run Mongoose, yu name gone abroad
Run mongoose, yu name gone abroad.

1
Mongoose, go in a *Bedward kitchen
Tek out one a him righteous chicken
Put in a him waistcoat pocket
Slide Mongoose.
2
Mongoose tek up a half-a-brick
Bedward tek up a piece a stick
Mongoose say if you lick I slip you
*Slide Mongoose.
3
Mongoose say him like rice an' pumpkin,
Bedward say him like cornmeal dumplin',
Mongoose say you no know good something
*Slide mongoose.
4
Bedward draw a six-shooter gun,
Mongoose tek up a pint a rum.
Bedward halla: Lord, watch de fun.
*We all gone in.
5
Mongoose say him a *Backra man
Bedward say you a *red-Ibo man,
Mongoose say: look *how 'im 'tan'!
Slide Mongoose
6
Mongoose go in a Palace Theatre
Swear to king him a operator
Willy-Willy say come back later.
From "Jamaican Folk Songs," Selections by the Frats Quintet of Jamaica. Edited by Edward Seaga. Insert in 1955 LP. reposted from www.mentomusic.com

[Comments posted by Q on http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=138126&messages=16 ; May 29, 2011]
Slide- sly? Or is their rather slithery movement meant?
Bedward- cult leader who led a fanatical outburst of Revivalism.
We all gone in- trouble brewing.
Backra- boss man.
red-Ibo- fairer skin than most central Africans, like Ibo tribesmen.
how....- look at him.

(Digression- The mongoose was introduced into Hawai'i to control rats in sugar cane, but is wreaking havoc among native bird species and has proven of little use in rat control. Its value in the Caribbean is doubtful.)

****
SLY MONGOOSE (Example #3)
Listen to the song about a sly mongoose.

Sly Mongoose, your name gone abroad,
Sly Mongoose, your name gone abroad

Mongoose slip into Bedward kitchen,
Steal out one of his righteous chicken,
Steal out one of his waistcoat pocket,
Sly Mongoose.
Sly Mongoose, your name gone abroad

Mongoose went up to Bedward daughter,
Ask her if he could have some water.
Bedward daughter say, Whats the matter?
Sly Mongoose.
Sly Mongoose, your name gone abroad

Mongoose get out a dollar and a quarter,
Slipped it to old Bedward daughter.
Bedward daughter say, My Lord and master!
Sly Mongoose.
Sly Mongoose, your name gone abroad

Bedward went up to see his daughter,
Found Mongoose playing with one garter,
Bedward hit him just where he oughter.
Sly Mongoose.
Sly Mongoose, your name gone abroad

[Comment:]
The mongoose of this topical song was a well-known government official who tried to buy the affections of one of the prophet Bedward's daughters.
- http://www.unlockingthearchives.rgs.org/themes/journeys/gallery/resource...
Barbados, Unlocking the archives; learning resources for schools; hat tip to MorwenEdhelwen1 on http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=138126&messages=16 ; May 30, 2011

-snip-

Note that the title and lyrics "Sly Mongoose" is sometimes given as "Slide Mongoose".

****
SOLAS MARKET & WHEEL AND TURN

Uploaded by valeriocool on Sep 13, 2008
at: http://www.jollyboysmusic.com

Editor:
Here's a descrption for the dance move "wheel and turn" from a commenter who indicates that she (or he) is Jamaican:
"...'wheel and turn' [is] a move where you spin as fast and rhymically as you can and then break or stop and change moves or spin in the oposite direction."
- from Part Admin/Part Tour Guide; http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100707150927AA7b8ed Jamaicans what does "wheel and turn me" mean? , July 6, 2010
-snip-

The word "wheel" may have originally been "whirl".

Here's a video rendition of the song "Solas' Market"

Jamaica Folk Revue Live Performance at the 2010 Anancy Festival

Uploaded by outofmanyonline on Jun 2, 2011

Jamaica Folk Revue Live Performance at the 2010 Anancy Festival. Anancy (Ananse or Anansi) is the West African trickster hero of numerous folk tales that are popular across the Caribbean and throughout the African Diaspora. This clever and conniving character is familiar to millions of people around the world. Anancy Festival is a celebration of the Caribbean's diverse and spectacular cultural heritage, both traditional and contemporary, and is designed to have special appeal to the young and young at heart. Children and parents will have the opportunity to learn about Caribbean culture, including folklore, history, music, dance and art.

****
TIEF TEK OVA TOWN

Oberlin High performs "Tief Tek Ova Town" on All Together Sing 2010

Uploaded by pussjook on Nov 1, 2010

****
TINGALAYO

Uploaded by thesamoobsluha on Mar 10, 2008

****
SUGAR YOU COME
Boy: Sugar you come?
Girl: Yes I come again
Boy: What you bring?
Girl: Cake and sugar plum
Boy: Give me some?
Girl: I can’t give you none
Boy: Oh sugar, Sweet sugar
- David Bowen, Cultural Officer, Turks & Caicos Tourist Board ; http://www.timespub.tc/2002/06/rediscovering-the-hidden-culture-folk-songs/ (Turks & Caicos Islands ; posted summer 2002; retrieved June 2, 2011

Editor:
According to David Bowen the author of that article, the boy is asking for more than the actual cake and sugar plum dessert and the girl is refusing the boys request.

****
TI WE -ST LUCIA NATIONAL YOUTH CHOIR

Uploaded by glnlake on Nov 9, 2007

From our "Caribbean Village ~ A chorale village" production which we put on for the ICC Cricket world cup.

Here's information from the summary that was provided for an instrumental sound file of this song that is posted at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y26h8JFUhNM&feature=watch_response
"The title is translated to "Remove your hand". The song is about a guy caught red handed stealing from a priest's brief case. This man is then asked to remove his hands from the priest's brief case(tiwe' lamain dans gwip pret-la)."

****
TEACHER LICK DE GAL (Jamaica)
traditional, as performed by The Cudjoe Minstrels

One shift me have ratta cut i'
['ratta' means 'rat', so she has cut out the ratty portion]
Same place I cut Muma patch i'
[then mommy patched it, but...]
Same place I patch fire bun i'
Teacher lick the gal i' tun right over
['lick' meaning 'hit' or 'strike']

One fine gal over Linstead
Teacher lick the gal i' tun right over
Hold 'im round 'im waist Moder Tracy
Teacher lick the gal i' tun right over

Tan, tan, tan, tan, Make me tell you
[the sheet music notes that 'tan' means 'stand', specifically 'hold still']
A bitter Cassada kill Joe Browne
['Cassada' = 'cassava']

- from http://www.mentomusic.com/edricConner.htm#Frats

Editor: "Shift" is probably a shirt
It appears that the fact that the lyrics of this song combines several different subjects wasn't as important as the song's rhythm and beat.

****
TIMBO LIMBO
Tim-bo, Lim-bo, Tim-bo, Lim-bo, Tim-bo, Lim-bo,
Same gal, Ly-di-a, Tim-bo, Lim-bo, Tim-bo Lim-bo,
Tim-bo Lim-bo, Tim-bo Lim-bo. Same gal, Lydi-a. Tim-bo Lim-bo.

A slight variation which sometimes appeared in the third measure, but without regularity was:

Tim-bo Lim-bo.

"Timbo Limbo,
Same gal Lydia,
Timbo Limbo o-o-o!" [sand 3x]

Timbo Limbo,
Same gal Lydia,
Timbo Limbo o!"
,
"Timbo Limbo,
Same gal Lydia,
Timbo Limbo o-o!"

"Timbo Limbo,
Same gal Lydia,
Timbo Limbo o-o-o!"
-excerpts from story "The Fish Lover" (# 78) collected from Thomas White, Maroon Town.
posted in http://www.sacred-texts.com/afr/jas/jas078.htm [with musical score]
From Martha Warren Beckwith, Jamaica Anansi Stories?

****
TIM MO LIM MO
Oh who dey ca’ me Tim-mo Lim-mo, Tim-mo Lim-mo, oh?
Zin ku ma Ya ya ya, oh, Zin ku ma
Tim-mo Lim-mo, oh. Tim-mo Lim-mo oh. Zin ku ma
Ya ya ya. oh Zin ku ma. Ah who dey ca’ me Tim-mo Lim-mo?
Ah, who dey ca’ me Tim-mo Lim-mo, oh Zin ku ma. Ya ya ya,. oh
Zin ku ma Tim-mo Lim-mo, oh. Zin ku ma
Ah, who dey ca’ me Tim-mo Lim-mo?
Ah, who dey ca’ me, Tim-mo Lim-mo.
Tim-mo Lim-mo, oh Zin ku ma Ya ya ya, oh Zin ku ma
- included in Jamaica Anansi Stories, collected from William Forbes, Dry River; Cock pit Country; Martha Warren Beckwith, music recorded by Helen Roberts;New York; American Folk Lore Society, Volume XVII; 1924
http://www.aren.org/prison/documents/african/14/14.pdf
[with musical score]but no story other than "Anansi Makes A Dance", # 142]

Editor:
It's probable that "Timbo Limbo" is another version (a later version?) of Tim-mo Lim-mo".

The similarities between the names "Lim-mo" and "Limbo" and the Trinidadian limbo dance may be coincidental.

****
Ti Wé - St Lucia National Youth Choir

Glen Richard Morgan-Lake, Uploaded on Nov 9, 2007

From our "Caribbean Village ~ A chorale village" production which we put on for the ICC Cricket world cup.

****
TREE FALL DOWN
Country: Anguilla
Language: English

Lyrics:
Molly climb up the mango tree
Oh tree fall down
Molly climb up the mango tree
Oh tree fall down
So high up in the mango tree
Oh tree fall down
Too high up in the mango tree

Ohhhhhhhhh! Tree fall down!

"More info: From the Alan Lomax recording, "Caribbean Voyage: Caribbean Sampler. This song hints at the Caribbean proverb, "Big tree fall down, goat bite e leaf"," which means "When a great man falls, he is no longer feared and respected." For more Caribben proverbs, visit http://www.islandmix.com/backchat/f6/caribbean-proverbs-72299/ "
- http://www.allaroundthisworld.com/songs-caribbean.html

U, V

W, X
WANGOL O
(Creole)

wangol o' ou ale
ki le ou a vini wem anko? ou ale
wangol o' ou ale
ki le ou a vini wem anko? ou ale
ki le ou a vini wem anko?
peyi-a chanje,
ki le ou a viniwem anko?
peyi-a chanje,
ki le ou a vini (or pase) wem anko, ou ale.

-snip
(English)

Wangolo (could refer to Angola/Kongolese ancestor)
Wangolo, you're leaving,
when will you come and see me again.
When will you come and see me again?
The country is changing, (or our situation is changing)
When will you come back and see me again ?
wangol o' ou ale
ki le ou a vini wem anko? ou ale
-Haitian folk song (lyrics posted in video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUhvZVtRX3w summary by richtotheie on Jan 18, 2010

Here' s a video of that Haitian folk song:

Uploaded by richtotheie on Jan 18, 2010
"I recorded this song while i was in Haiti in 2005. A series of delays on a project we were shooting left me bored yet inspired and with the few hours of electricity each day, i recorded little by little, track over track to come up with this. The very first melodic line is the only line true to the Haitian folk song, all the rest is my own arrangement.

Also, these were the photos i shot while i was there... (before i got into photography!) Enjoy!"

Y, Z
YAM MEDLEY (Version #1)

Mannings School performs Yam medley on All Together Sing 2010.

Uploaded by pussjook on Nov 1, 2010

Mannings School [Jamaica] performs Yam medley on All Together Sing 2010.

**
YAM MEDLEY (Version #2)

St Hilda's High. All Together Sing 2011. Folk Special. "Yam Medley"

Uploaded by pussjook on Oct 24, 2011

St Hilda's High [Jamaica] All Together Sing 2011. Folk Special. "Yam Medley"

****
Please send examples of and/or links to Caribbean folk songs & rhymes along with demographical information, particularly the source nation to: cocojams17@yahoo.com

Your email address is never posted or shared. Or, if you are on Facebook, visit me at cocojams jambalayah, and befriend me, or send me a private message!

****
Thanks for visiting this page!

Also, click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/ to visit my blog.

Pancocojams is an eclectic mix of information, comments, and videos about the histories, cultures, and customs of African Americans & other People of Color.

The name "pancocojams" reflects this site's wide range of topics. The name "pancocojams" also reflects this blog's connection to my http://www.cocojams.com website.

Please visit and comment on this blog!

.
****

Share! Learn! Enjoy!

Cocojams - Share! Learn! Enjoy! - cocojams17@yahoo.com
Copyright © 2001-2011 Azizi Powell; All Rights Reserved