Foot Stomping Cheers

FOOT STOMPING CHEERS

This page provides information about text examples and a few video examples of foot stomping cheers (stomps).

Ms. Azizi Powell, Founder/Editor
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

Latest revision: April 4, 2014
Contact cocojams17@yahoo.com

Because there is very little information online and off-line about "foot stomping cheers" (stomps), this page includes a lengthy editorial comment.

Examples of foot stomping cheers (stomps) are posted below this comment.

OVERVIEW OF FOOT STOMPING
by Azizi Powell (Latest revision October 20, 2013)

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF FOOT STOMPING CHEERS
Foot stomping cheers are a relatively new category of children's informal recreational activity. The earliest documentation that I've found for these cheers is in the 1970s.

Foot stomping cheers & their performance actvity are different from the type of cheers and the cheerleading performances that are usually associated with "mainstream" cheerleading. That said, since the early 2000s, a number of mainstram cheerleader squads have included foot stomping cheers or foot stomping-like cheers as part of their repertorie.*

Unlike hand clap games, people performing foot stomping cheers don't stand still. However, they also don't move across the performance space as other cheerleaders, drill teams, and dancers do.

Also unlike other playground rhymes & cheers, rhyming verses may only make up a small portion of a foot stomping cheer. Foot stomping cheers have a distinctive structure which is a variant form of "call & response". Unlike other call & response composition, in foot stomping cheers the group voice is heard first. [Depending on the particular cheer, sometimes the soloist speaks along with other members of the group, and sometimes she doesn't.] The first soloist then responds to the group, and the group then responds back to the soloist. In some foot stomping cheers, the soloist then has a short solo part which the group may or may not respond to. At "the end of the cheer", the cheer immediately begins from the beginning with the next soloist. This pattern continues until every member of the group has had one equal length turn as the soloist.

"Foot stomping" ("doing stomps" or "doing steps") is characterized by two or more children (usually girls between the ages of 6-12 years old) chanting a distinctive form of cheer* while they perform synchronized, choreographed routines that emphasize the creation of bass sounding foot stomps. The stomping routine is performed in a metronome like manner throughout the entire cheer. Once the beat starts, it continues until the end of the cheer, although sometimes the soloist's portion is slightly different.* Those foot stomps alternate with (individual) hand clap or (according to the agreed upon, rehearsed routine) alternate with body pats, including foot pats. The foot stomps have a bass sound because the foot hit the floor (or ground) and the hand claps or body pats are loud & crisp.

*I consider "Shabooya Roll Call" from the cheerleading movie Bring It On: All Or Nothing to be an exaggerated, "foot stomping-like cheer, as are the other cheers performed by "urban" [meaning Black & Latina cheerleading squads in those Bring It On movies, including the first movie in that series.]

CHANGES IN FOOT STOMPING CHEERS AS A RESULT OF THEIR INCLUSION IN MAINSTREAM CHEERLEADER SQUADS
Since at least the beginning of the 21st century, foot stomping cheers have been adapted & integrated into the repertoire of mainstream children's cheerleading & team cheer activities. That integration means that in discussing those cheers it may be best to refer to "traditional foot stomping cheers" and "mainstream" foot stomping cheers. For instance, traditionally, foot stomping cheers were chanted by two or more girls who performed synchronized, choreographed foot stomp routines similar to historically Black Greek letter organizations' steppin. However, the performance of foot stomps need not be, and often appears not to be, a part of mainstream cheerleaders or team cheers' experiences of foot stomping cheers.

THE STRUCTURE OF TRADITIONAL FOOT STOMPING CHEERS
Traditionally, foot stomping cheers start with the group voice. The group may begin by chanting the name of the cheer, and then calls on a member of the group. Or the cheer may begin with the group calling that person & stating their demand. Usually, the soloist responds to the group in a surly manner, and initially refuses to comply with their demand. However, the soloist eventually complies and chants a soloist portion & performs a brief foot stomping routine/dance. At the conclusion of that portion, that rendition of the cheer ends.

in other examples of foot stomping cheers, the group chants the same words as the soloist did, and then the cheer ends- only to immediately start again from the beginning with a new soloist. In some foot stomping cheers the soloist's lines are exactly the same, with the exception of the soloist's name or some personal information such as her astrological sign, or her favorite color. In other foot stomping cheers, the soloist's lines can be different, but must fit into the same theme as the cheer, and must follow the same cheer's metronome style beat.

In contrast to that traditional model, in mainstream cheer performances, there's likely not to be any soloist foot stomping or dance performance, and the foot stomping cheer itself may end before every member of the group has a turn as soloist. Furthermore, in mainstream foot stomping cheers, the cheer may begin with a soloist, or two people, or part of the group, and the rest of the group responds to the soloist. This is the opposite of the traditional foot stomping cheer pattern. Here's an example of a mainstream foot stomping cheer:

SO CHECK HER OUT
Ah hey,a people,uh how do you do?
(So check her out.)
I wanna introduce myself to you
(So check her out)
My name is ___ and thats no lie!
(So check her out)
Im going home on the winners side!
(So check her ouuuuuuutttt!)
JaslFam, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpTogP4eNrU ,softball cheers ,2011
-snip-

In my direct observations of foot stomping performances was of African American girls (ages usually 6-12 years) in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area mostly within the late 1980s to the early 2000s but up 2009, foot stomping was an informal, recreational activity for two or more girls. However, mainstream foot stomping cheers are performed by formal groups of children's/youth cheerleaders or children/youth who are members of a sports team. Also, traditional foot stomping cheers were created and chanted by (mostly) African Americans girls while mainstream foot stomping cheers appear to be repeated, adapted, and chanted by (mostly) White girls.

One term that I've seen used on YouTube videos of mainstream (mostly White) cheerleaders to describe their foot stomping routines is stomps. But in the YouTube videos that I've watched of foot stomping cheers by mainstream cheerleaders & sports team members, the foot stomping cheers themselves are referred to as "cheers". It should be mentioned that American softball is one particular children's/youth sports that appears to have a large number of foot stomping cheers.

DESCRIPTION OF FOOT STOMPING & STOMPS
"Foot stomping" combines chanting a distinctive form of cheer with the performance of synchronized, choreographed routines that emphasize the creation of bass sounding foot stomps. The stomping routine is performed in a metronome like manner throughout the entire cheer. Once the beat starts, it continues until the end of the cheer, although sometimes the soloist's portion is slightly different.* Those foot stomps alternate with (individual) hand clap or (according to the agreed upon, rehearsed routine) alternate with body pats, including foot pats. The foot stomps have a bass sound because the foot hit the floor (or ground) and the hand claps or body pats are loud & crisp.

*In my observations of traditional foot stomping, while the soloist sung (chanted) her portion, the remaining members of the group didn't stomp, but stood there silently observing her with respectful, attentive expressions of their faces.

While I refer to "foot stomping" ("stomps") as a movement performance art, traditionally, foot stomping is an "in place" activity (an activity done while standing in the same spot). There's more movement from one spot to another in traditional foot stomping than there is in comparison to the very stationary performance art of handclap games. which But traditional foot stomping has much less movement than in other performance movement activities such as "steppin", "drill teams", "mainstream cheerleading" and "stomp & shake cheerleading" where performers are expected to move across the performance "stage". In traditional foot stomping, "stompers" might move away from their starting spot when they slide to the right, or slide to the left, but then they quickly return to their starting place. One noticable exception to that movement rule that I recall from my direct observance of these cheer performances was the popular foot stomping cheer "One Two Three Four Five" which done in a vertical formation. In that cheer, the first & second soloist moved after their solo part to form another line to the right or to the left of the original line and all subsequent stompers alternately moved to the front of either the newly formed right line or the newly formed left line. Unlike other foot stomping cheers, while the soloist stomped while chanting her portion, the remaining stompers continued doing that foot stomp beat. However, even in this example, the vertical lines themselves were stationary, as the lines of stompers didn't move away from their starting locations.

Videos of mainstream girl teams softball cheers show some ways that foot stomping cheers are performed. The team crouches on the knees in a circle with one or more girls in the center. The girl or girl in the center are the soloist. The other girls hit their knees and the ground to make a beat. At the conclusion of this cheer, all of the girls stand in a close circle with linked arms or with the hand of one of their extended arm touching in the center as they cheer loudly.

Mainstream foot stomping cheers may also be chanted while a cheerleading team "stomps" (does a steppin-like routine). However, these performances may be different-less percussive, less group synchornized, less rhythmic, less "on-beat" than traditional foot stomping.

One example of those performance changes when foot stomping cheers are performed in the "mainstream" is how the foot stomping cheer "Introduce Yourself" was done at the prom in the first Bring It On cheerleader movie (2000). Here's a link to a video clip of that scene.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWG4AX09mqQ

That video & text examples of "Introduce Yourself" are found below.

Another significant exception to the "remain in place" feature of traditional foot stomping cheers" is that from at least 2009, in my observation, instead of chanting her solo part while staying in her place within the line or the semi-circle of other stompers, the soloist moved in front of those other stompers, often to the center of that formation. When her solo is over, still facing forward, she steps back into the line, but not necessarily to the spot where she orginally was standing. At the same time, the next soloist moves forward. I credit this change in performance style to the on stage performances of these cheers at non-competititve school assemblies, at competitive or non-competitive talent shows, or during other occassions. During those performances and then during the "regular" performance of those cheers, stompers adopted the standard stage pattern of the "lead singer" being out front of the "backup singers".

Note: I've learned that some foot stomping cheers occured/occur in circles. In those cases, the soloist moves to the center of the circle & then returns to the circle when her cheer soloist ends & another girl takes her place. An example of this is the "You Betta Move" cheer that is found below.

EARLY DOCUMENTATION OF FOOT STOMPING
The earliest documented performances of foot stomping cheers that I have found is from the mid 1970s in Washington D.C. school girls (the 1976 vinyl record Mother Hippletoe: Rural & Urban Children's Songs, New World Records.* Although those Washington D.C. school girls weren't identified by race, it seems certain that they were Black. I'm certain of that given the predominately Black population of Washington D.C. at that time, given the African American vernacular in those four (actually five cheer examples since one example is made up of two cheers strung together), and given the Black cultural references found in those cheers (such as "Foxy Brown").

According to that record notes written by Kate Rinzler, the school girls who were recorded indicated that they formed informal non-adult initiated groups that met to perform chants & create routines in imitation of gymnasts in televised Olympic programs, and/or "real" cheerleaders. *Click http://www.newworldrecords.org/linernotes/80291.pdf to read the record notes and text of the other three examples from that Mother Hippletoe: Rural & Urban Children's Songs.

Judging from the examples of foot stomping cheers that have been sent to Cocojams.com, and judging from online comments in several blogs that mention those cheers, the informal recreational activity that I refer to as "foot stomping cheers" was (and may still be) done throughout the United States. Ironically, although I believe that these cheers originated among African American girls and may still be associated with ormed by African American girls, the earliest example of foot stomping cheers that I have personally "collected" is one from the 1970s which was sent to Cocojams.com from a White woman who attended an integrated (Black, White, and Latino) high school in Atlantic City, New Jersey. This is quite a coincidence, since I attended that same high school in the early to mid 1960s. (See "Introduce Youself:, Version #10 below).

EARLY SOURCES OF FOOT STOMPING AND FOOT STOMPING CHEERS
I believe the structure, words, and performance activity of foot stomping cheers were greatly influenced by Funk music (and in particular Washington D.C,'s Go Go music) of the 1970s and 1980s. Early "Rap" music, particularly the in-your face, confrontational attitude of Rap music also influenced the performance of foot stomping & the content of foot stomping cheers. The performance art of "steppin" was also very influential in the performance of foot stomping and in the content -but not the structure-of foot stomping cheers. Of course, the performance of cheerleading & cheer leading cheers themselves also influenced the content of foot stomping cheers but not the performance of foot stomping. (However, in her record notes, Kate Rinzler indicates that she observed Washington D. C. school girls chanting while they performed splits and other gymnastic movements in imitation of cheerleaders. If performing gymnastic movements was originally a part of foot stomping performances, that performance style seemed to quickly give way to the influence of "steppin". By the way, Kate Rinzler didn't include any mention of steppin or foot stomping movements in her record notes.)

More research should be done on why the 1970s from their inception to their end was such a creative period of time for various forms of African American music and performance arts. Also, it would be very interesting to consider why the Washington, D.C./Virginia area was the location where many of these performance arts & musical forms first flowered. In addition to Washington D.C. being the seat of the call & response Go Go music, D.C. and the contiguous North Carolina area was probably the birthplace for "stomp & shake " cheerleading.

I think that one reason for the 1970s being so significant was that there was increased enrollment of African Americans in colleges and universities at that time. The increased enrollment in universities led to a larger number of African Americans joining historically Black Greek lettered fraternities and sororities. An increased number of people joining those Black Greek lettered organizations (BGLO) led to the general public-particularly the African American general public becoming more familiar with the performance art of steppin/g, in part because step shows began to be held in venues within Black communities.

FOOT STOMPING CHEERS AS AN ORAL TRADITION
Prior to the early 2000s, foot stomp cheers was mostly an oral tradition. There are few examples of foot stomping cheers found in off-line publications. Those examples that are found in off-line publications are usually in collections of African American children's rhymes such as Apple On A Stick. However, even in those books, these rhymes are mislabed "hand claps" or generically categorized as "hand jives" or "children's playground rhymes". Online examples of foot stomping cheers such as those found on this website are probably the first time that most of these examples have been written down.

COMPARISON BETWEEN FOOT STOMPING AND STEPPIN
Among African American girls in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area (1980s to 2006), performing foot stomping was referred to as "doing cheers", "doing steps", and "steppin". However, there are actually significant differences between foot stomping and historically Black Greek letter steppin. The main difference is that persons doing "foot stomps" rarely move from the spot were they start, but persons steppin move across the performance floor. Also, while body pattin & (individual) hand clapping can be part of a step routine, it need not be a part of that routine. Furthermore, there are never any props-such as canes or sticks-in foot stomping, but rhythmically hitting canes/sticks on the ground, twirling canes/sticks, and throwing & catching canes & sticks are a integral part of certain Black Greek letter organizations' step routines.

Furthermore, since at least the late 1990s, portion of step routines are often done to recorded music (R&B/Hip-Hop). But "foot stomping" is traditionally done without any musical accompaniment except that which the stompers make with their own bodies (chanting, foot stomps, hand claps, and body pats).

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GROUP/CONSECUTIVE SOLOIST TEXTUAL STRUCTURE OF FOOT STOMPING CHEERS
Traditionally, foot stomping cheers have a characteristic, modified call & response structure. My term for that structure is "group/consecutive soloists".

"Group/consecutive soloist means that the cheer begins either with the entire group speaking in unison, or the entire group with the exception of the first soloist. Foot stomping cheers that don't start with the group speaking in unison are called "modified foot stomping cheers".

Foot stomping cheers often start with a command or a question from the group & a response from the first designated soloist. The words of the cheer continue to alternate between the rest of the group and that designated soloist until that rendition of the cheer ends either with the soloist's lines or with lines spoken by the soloist and the rest of the group. However-and this is a crucial characteristic of foot stomping cheers- the cheer immediately starts again with the next designated soloist. This pattern is supposed to continue without pause until every member of the group gets one turn as soloist for that particular cheer.

Given the time constraints that they face during an actual game or during half-time when they perform longer cheer, a group/consecutive soloist pattern would be impossible for sports team cheerleaders to perform. When girls perform foot stomping cheers as an informal leisure time activity, they don't have those same time constraints

The order of soloists is determined before the cheer starts. One method of deciding the order of soloist is that the fastest person to call out “first”, “second”, “third” etc gets those positions. Additional individuals can't join a performance of a cheer that has already begun. When a member of the the person has had her turn as soloist, she chants with the group again and the next soloist immediately takes her turn. This pattern continues until every group member has a turn as the soloist.

With every rendition of a particular cheer, each soloist either says the exact same words (with the exception of personal information such as her name, her nickname, and her astrology sign) or the soloist chants other lines that fit the beat and the theme of the chant. This pattern continues until every person in the group has had one turn as the soloist.

Some foot stomping cheers are repeated word for word by each new soloists, with the exception of personalized information such as the soloist's name or nickname. However, for certain cheers, there is an expectation that girls change the rhyming verses that they chant.

Some foot stomping cheers begin with a member of the group (the leader or captain) calling out "Here we go now!" or "Kick that beat". That line serves the same purpose as "Ready, set, go". I consider the start of the cheer to be after this line.

There is very litlle improvisation in foot stomping cheer routines. Furthermore, the lyrics of these cheers aren't open ended. No soloist's turn is longer than any other soloist.

It's very important to emphasize that the words to foot stomping cheers are memorized before the cheer is performed. Once the beat starts, no one has time to think about what to say. If one person in the group pauses because she forgot the words she was going to say, or if she adds words to a fixed line, not only would she mess up her own performance of the routine, but she would mess things up for the entire group. One person freezing up because she forgot what she was going to say, or pausing for the same reason, or adding syllables (additional words) to a line, throws the entire routine off beat. When the synchronized foot stomping routine is "messed" up because someone goes "off beat", the entire cheer has to begin from the beginning. I've seen girls leave a cheer line when the group decides to do a cheer whose words or routine those girls don't know at all or don't know well. While they were "sitting that cheer out", those girls were watching, listening, and learning the cheer. To do otherwise might mean they would mess up the cheer routine for other people and earn a reputation of being a bad (not good) stepper.

Though direct performances, and observations, girls acquire a repertoire of lend rhymes, and lines that they can use in those cheers where it is expected that each girl come up with a different soloist verse. It seems to me that less often, girls "make up" other lines that ifit the beat and also fit the theme of those rhymes. I'm using italics to emphasize those two points because both are VERY important.

For those particular cheers, girls gain status if they "make up" a good line, and (theorectically at least) lose status, particularly if they are older, if they repeat the same lines that someone had previously said during that particular cheer performance.

For instance, in the example below that is titled "Call Reputation", regardless of which number soloist the girl is, during her turn as soloist she could say "My name is ___,and I'm number one/ my reputation has just begun". Or, *regardless of which number soloist she is), the girl could say "My name is ___ and "I'm number one/my reputation is having fun". Or the girl could say "My name is ___ and I'm number two/I'm kickin it with Scooby Doo". The girl could also say "My name is ___ and I'm number nine, I'm kickin it with Ginuwine" . Any such rhyme "works" as long as the soloist uses that same pattern, and comes up with a word that rhymes (or nearly rhymes) with a number. (In those examples "kickin it " means "relaxing with", "Scobby Doo" is the name of a cartoon dog, and "Ginuwine" is the name of an R&B/Hip Hop singer.)

FOOT STOMP CHEERS AS A PERFORMANCE ART
Although there are no costumes, a stage, settings, props, or make-up, foot stomping cheers routines are theatrical performances. Performers are supposed to look directly at their imagined or real audiences. Performers are also expected to speak the lines with a confident, regularly pitched speaking voice. The speaker’s tone and body language are supposed to match her spoken words. For instance, girls performing "confrontation style cheers" are supposed to chant their lines with "genuine" in-your face-attitude. With the exception of "dance style foot stomping cheers", while performing foot stomping cheers, the girls' facial expression is usually stern, and coolly disdainful, but not angry. ("Cool" here is used to evoke its Black slang meaning of keeping control and not showing anger during any confrontation with someone).

As can be seen from the examples provided below, somehow- in spite of the relative lack of off-line publication or formal recording of these cheers- there is a remarkable amount of consistency in the words of specifc cheers that were (or are) performed in often distant geographical locations within the United States.

Most foot stomping cheers are very emphemeral. Unfortunately, there has been very little documentation of these compositions. Consequently, many cheers from the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s and even cheers from the early 2000s have disappeared. This page is my attempt to collect, and document this often creative dance/movement and literary art form.

BEAT PATTERNS
Most foot stomping cheers use this beat pattern: "stomp clap/ stomp stomp clap". Another beat pattern is "stomp stomp clap/ stomp stomp clap." Those two standard beat patterns appear to be used for all foot stomping cheers.

Moderate tempo 4/4 beats created by those foot stomps alternate with the chanters'(individual) hand claps, body pats (especially thigh pats), and less frequently, finger snaps. Because these 4/4 beats are omnipresent in R&B, Hip-Hop, Rock, Gospel music, and other forms of music, those routines aren't that difficult for many African Americans (and others) to learn. The well known 1977 record "We Will Rock You" by Queen is an excellent example of a Rock song that has a 4/4 beat and therefore could serve as a backdrop for a foot stomping routine (recognizing, of course, that foot stomping chants aren't meant to be performed to recorded music).

WHERE CHEERS ARE PERFORMED & AUDIENCE BEHAVIOR
[This section refers to traditional foot stomping.]

Traditionally, foot stomping cheers are performed indoor or outdoors by at least two but usually four or six girls. Because many girls are reluctant to face teasing from other girls or boys, or from older children, my experience is that foot stomping rhymes are usually not performed on school playgrounds during lunch recess. (For that same reason, I've found that hand clap rhymes are also rarely if ever performed during school recess, before school, or after school). Usually foot stomping cheers are performed in the psychologically secure environments of girls' homes, or on porches or sidewalks outside of their homes.

There are usually no audiences for these cheer performances, unless they are done as part of a school or community program or talent show. The audience's behavior depends on where & when foot stomping cheers are done. If they are done in front of adults and other children in a supportive environment where no teasing is permitted, the audience's behavior is similar to the aduience at step shows. Girl's names are called out in support, and exhortations of praise such as "Get it!", "Alright now!", "Do it!" are heard

THE INFLUENCE OF THE BRING IT ON MOVIES
The inclusion of foot stomping cheers or adaptations of those cheers in the American cheerleading film series Bring It On (2000-2009), introduced many people to those cheers, albeit without the use of that term. However, in my opinion, the performance styles of cheers in the Bring It Ont movies are exaggerated examples of a combination of stomp and shake cheers and foot stomping cheers. Many cheers featured in Bring It On movies like the popular "Shabooya Roll Call" originated in African American communities prior to those movies. It's also worth pointing out that that example and other cheers from those movies barely retain their call & response pattern or their foot stomping performance routines.

GENERAL CATEGORIES OF FOOT STOMPING CHEERS
I have identified the following general categories of foot stomping cheers based on their text (words). (Note that a cheer might be placed in more than one category)

1. Introduction Cheers (Roll Call Cheers)
These cheers provide an oppotunity for the steppers to introduce themselves. The girls take turns giving their name, and/or nickname, and other information such as their favorite color, their astrological sign, their boyfriend's name, what they are interested in doing, and what they want to be when they grow up.

The term "roll call" refers to the practice (in school or otherwise) or a teacher or authority figure reading off the names of those on her or his "roll" (classroom or group list) to see who is in attendance. In the schools I'm familiar with, when the person's name is called, she or he responds "Here" or "Present".

2. Dance Style Cheer
These cheers provide opportunities to show off their steppin and dancing skills. The words of the cheers often name current, or popular "old-school" dances. Theorectically, each soloist is supposed to come up with a new dance that she very briefly performs at the end of her solo.

3. Taunting, Bragging Cheer
The words of these cheers are composed to demonstrate and reinforce the person's street cred (credibility). The word of these cheers include taunts and put downs (insults)directed toward an unidentified person or persons or the words focus on boasting about how tough (fearless) , physically attractive ("fine") and/or sexy the girls are (with sexiness being defined as being able to get any man they want, regardless of whether he is someone else's boyfriend).

It should be noted that most foot stomping cheers have an element or elements of bragging. However, in taunting, bragging style foot stopping cheers, the brag is given as an "in your face, confrontational, taunt or challenge" to the unidentified person or to a group such as the rival cheerleading squad in a "you can't best this" way.

Taunting / bragging foot stomping cheers are a pre-dozens (cappin, sounding", "joning", "woofing", "wolfing", "sigging", or "signifying) exchange. Click http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dozens for more information on the African American tradition known as "the dozens."

4. Romance Cheers
These cheers focus on love and romance. They are similar to the category #3 but with fewer or no confrontational words.

5. Group Promotion Cheers
These cheers focus on praising the group and/or the neighborhood or city the group is from.

SEVERAL RELATED COCOJAMS PAGES

http://www.cocojams.com/content/classification-foot-stomping-cheers-exam...

http://www.cocojams.com/content/fraternity-and-sorority-chants .

click http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-cheerleader-cheers

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CONTACT INFORMATION
Please send examples of children's foot stomping cheers for possible posting on this page to: cocojams17@yahoo.com

Your email address is never posted or shared.

Or if you are on facebook, visit me at cocojams jambalayah, and befriend me, or send me a private message!

Please be aware that by sharing your examples or comments with me, you are giving me permission to include it in a book or in any other off-line publication.

Thanks!

Although it is not required, please include information about how this cheer is performed. Also, for the sake of folkloric research, please include the following demographical information: where you learned the cheer (please include the city & state if within the USA, and the nation, if outside the USA); when you learned this cheer (year or decade such as 2008, the 1990s, or the mid 1970s); and who performed this cheer (ages, genders, races/ethnicities). Thanks!

Note: All videos embedded on Cocojams .com are from http://www.youtube.com/ . Videos are posted on this site for educational, entertainment, aesthetic, historical, and folkloric purposes. All rights to these videos remain with their respectful owners.

I sincerely thank all the video uploaders whose videos I have reposted on Cocojams.com. I also sincerely thank YouTube.com for helping to make these videos available to the general public. If an uploader of a video sends a request to cocojams17@yahoo.com for me to remove his or her video from Cocojams.com, I will do so. Please note that links to YouTube videos or to other online resources may not remain viable. Please also be aware that comments posted on YouTube viewer comments threads may not be suitable for children.

Thanks to all who have sent in examples for possible posting on these pages. Special thanks to all those who remembered to include demographical information!

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EXAMPLES OF FOOT STOMPING CHEERS
Examples are listed in alphabetical order and are posted in chronological order with examples with the earliest date posted first.

NUMBERS

1,2,3,4,5 (Version #1)
Entire Group: 1,2,3,4,5
Soloist #1: My name is Jackie and I say hi
Entire Group: 6,7,8,9,10
Soloist #1: I’m gonna step aside to meet my friend

Entire Group: 1,2,3,4,5
Soloist #2: My name is Shadaya and I’m here to say hi.
Entire Group: 6,7,8,9,10
Soloist #2: I’m gonna step aside to meet my friend.

Entire Group: 1,2,3,4,5
Soloist #3: My name is Marquis and I’d like to say hi.
Entire Group: 6,7,8,9,10
Soloist #3: I’m gonna step aside to meet my friend
(Repeat the entire chant until everyone has introduced themselves, and then say this)
Entire Group: 1,2,3,4,5
We are Alafia ** and we’re here to say hi
6,7,8,9,10
We’re gonna step together cause that’s the end.

* child says her or his name or nickname
** group says its name or the name of their neighborhood, or school
-Alafia Children's Ensemble, Pittsburgh, PA, 1998

Editor:
Alafia Children's Ensemble was an after-school performance group that I founded in 1997. The group performed contemporary cheers and traditional, adapted, and original African American game songs.
Jackie {a 10 year old female} introduced this cheer to me {and to some members of the group who didn't know it}. Here's how this cheer is done:

A group of girls and boys form a vertical line and start “stepping” (i.e. performing the following foot pattern “Stomp stomp clap; stomp stomp clap”.) After making sure that everyone has the beat (everyone is doing the chant correctly), the entire group begins to chant in an alternating call & response pattern. When the first soloist ends his or her solo chant (“I’m gonna step aside to meet my friend), he or she gestures to the next person in line and then moves to the side, forming a 2nd vertical line to the right of the first line.

When the second person in the first line is finished saying his solo chant (“I’m gonna step aside etc”), she {or he} forms a 3rd vertical line to the left of the first. There are now three vertical lines. Each time a performer finishes as soloist, she or he moves to the front of either the 2nd or 3rd line.

When one performer moves to the front of the 2nd line, the next performer moves to the front of the 3rd line. The performers who have had a turn as soloist continue chanting and doing the step pattern, but they are now moving backwards in their individual lines. This pattern continues until every person has had a turn as the soloist. At that point, the group chants the name of their group and the 2nd and 3rd line merges into the 1st line. Sometimes the cheer ends with the performers bowing while they say “this is the end”.

****
1,2,3,4,5 (Version #2)
1,2,3,4,5 my names (say your name)
and i say hi
6,7,8,9,10 back it up and meet my friend
{as many friends as you have say}
1,2,3,4,5 my names (say your name)
and i say hi 6,7,8,9,10
back it up and thats the end
-Alexa; 12/30/2006

Editor:
Note that the soloist maintains the step beat while moving backward but still facing frontward. This is different than the movement done in example #1 at the end of the soloist's line. However, in 2006 I saw some children in Pittsburgh do it this way.

****
A,B
A BOOM BOOM CHECK(Example #1)
Group- Ah boom boom check check ah boom boom
A boom boom check check ah boom boom
First soloist- Tamara!
Group - Ah boom boom check check ah boom boom
Second soloist-Rita!
Group - Ah boom boom check check ah boom boom
Third Soloist- Aleeya!
Group- Ah boom boom check check ah boom boom
[Continue until each girl has a turn as soloist]
-Tazi M. Powell (African American female, memories of childhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania mid 1980s) ; collected by Azizi Powell 1997

Editor: Tazi Powell is my daughter. She demonstrated this foot stomping cheer and others for me and I recorded them on an audio tape. I recall observing my daughter and her girlfriends doing this cheer and others in the 1980s. Furthermore, I have observed girls (all African American) doing various foot stomping cheers (but not this one) in the 1990s during the after-school game song groups that my daughter and I facilitated, and at summer camp sessions where my daughter worked.

I believe the phrase "boom boom check" comes from the practice of djs or other people saying "microphone check 1 2" to see if the microphone was working. I recall that there was a cheer called "Microphone Check" but neither I nor my daughter or any other can remember that one.

****
AH BOOM BOOM CHECK (Example #2)
a boom boom check
check a boom check
my name is "insert name"
go "----", go "-----"
i live in brooklyn
go brooklyn, go brooklyn
my sign is "insert sign~mine is libra"
go libra, go libra
so get down with the libras
so get down with the libras (while doing your own silly little dance that everyone else copies and does with you)
- bitsy196, http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=31403&page=6. 06-25-2003

Editor: This is an example of a cheer that was included on a historically Black Greek lettered sorority blog page about what rhymes & cheers the bloggers remembered from their childhood. Comments on that page suggests that most of those examples are from the 1980s or 1970s. This contributor's referent to Brooklyn indicates that she lived in a borough of New York City.

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/old-school-playground-rhymes-remembered-... for a cocojams page on those examples.

****
A BOOM CHICKA BOOM
Examples of this chant are found on this cocojam's page:
http://cocojams.com/content/childrens-camp-songs

****
AHH DO THE VEGETABLES

Sesame Street - Three Girls clap a song about Vegetables

Posted by wattamack4
July 31, 2007
-snip-
This cheer/rhyme begins with rhythmical, percussive foot stomping/handclap/body patting movements and then all the girls continue that routine and chant.

Here''s my transcription of this rhyme/cheer:

Ahhh do the vegetables*
Ahhh do the vegetables
One girl-Carrots
[rhythmical footstomping jump steps handclap, body patting]
One girl-Mushrooms
[footstomping jump steps, individual handclaps & body patting]
One girl- Zuchinni
[footstomping jump steps, handclap, body patting]
One girl-Peas
[footstomping jump steps, handclap, body patting]
One girl-String beans
[footstomping jump steps, handclap, body patting]
One girl-Corn
[footstomping jump steps, handclap, body patting]
One girl-Broccoli
[footstomping jump steps, handclap, body patting]
One girl-Onions
[footstomping jump steps, handclap, body patting]
[The entire group does the same foot stomping/handclap/body patting movements as in the beginning of the cheer and at the same time chants ]
Ahhh do the vegetables
Ahhh do the vegetables
Ahhh do the vegetables

* The girls may be saying "All of the vegetables" instead of "Ah Do The Vegetables".
-snip-
Editor: This is an old Sesame Street video of girls performing a foot stomping, body patting, and individual handclapping routine while chanting. Undoubtedly, the words to this rhyme/cheer were composed to conform to the educational purpose of Sesame Street:

My guess is that this cheer is a adaptation of the handclap rhyme "Concentration" where players have to quickly name an item in a particular category. In this case the category is "vegetables." That said, I'm not sure that "concentration" was or is played with foot stomping and body patting movements.

**
Here is another Sesame Street video that shows girls doing a stepping routine. This stepping routine is very similar if not the same as some foot stomping movements. However, the lyrical structure [the way the words are organized] is different from foot stomping cheers.

Sesame Street - 7 girls slide

Posted by sesamestreet66
November 20, 2007

"Seven girls dance to a chant about the number seven"

In this video, seven school age girls begin by standing in a horizontal line. Each child takes a turn counting to seven. The group then starts a stepping routine while chanting. The chant is"Seven pairs of hands; seven pairs of feet, we put it all together, on the same beat." The cheer meets the educational purposes of Sesame Street. However, the chanting, and choreographed individual handclapping and foot stomping are done in the foot stomping/stepping style.

Notice how the group says "Ahhh" when they stomp the ground during their routine. This adds another element of rhythm to that routine.

**
Here's another Sesame Street video with the same chanting pattern & similar movements for the number six:

Sesame Street - 6 dance

Posted by wattamack4
June 23, 2007

-snip-

*Visit Cocojams Handclap Rhyme page http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes to see videos of the handclap game "Slide". Also, visit Cocojams' Fraternity & Sorority Chants http://www.cocojams.com/content/fraternity-and-sorority-chants to learn more about stepping (steppin). In addition, visit Cocojams' Step & Stroll page http://www.cocojams.com/content/fraternity-sorority-step-stroll-related-... to see videos of teenagers and young adults doing steppin.

****
ANGELS GO SWINGING (Version #1)
Group: Angels go swinging angels go swinging!
angels go swinging, Angels go Swinging!
Solo:My name is Katy
I'm number 1
my reputation has just begun
so if you see me just step aside
'cause me and my man don't take no jive
Group: Uh, you thank (think) you bad
Solo: Bad enough to make you mad
Group, Uh, you thank you cool
Solo: Cool enough to go to high school
Group: Uh, you thank you fine
Solo: Fine enough to MO, fine enough to Macho (not really sure what this line means or if we were even saying it right)
fine enough to hula hoop,
fine enough to kick yo' duke
Everyone: say what, say what say what say what say what
-Joi; 3/23/2008; Birmingham, Alabama; 1990s

Editor:
This cheer is very much like the cheer "Hollywood Swingin" that has its source in the Kool & The Gang hit R&B song with that title. "The Angels" might be the name of Joi's school sports team.

****
ANGELS GO SWINGING (Version #2)
after the last "say what" the group joins in unison with a lot of atittude saying:

"...you heard me M.O. macho
hula hoop, kick yo duke
and you can kiss my alabama
my soultrain, my b.u.t.t. bootyshakin
yo momma stank, yo daddy stank
yo grandma smell like funky Fraaannkkss!
-brittany l, 3/15/2012

Editor: My interpretation of the comment that prefaces this cheer is that these lines are added on to the end of Version #1 given above. I don't know if these two bloggers are from the same school or the same area but their use of the words "M.O. macho" suggests that they are.

"Fraaannkkss!" might be pronounced “frankincense” [a type of incense].

****
AH RAH RAH AH BOOM TANG
Group: Ah rah rah ah boom tang
Ah rah rah ah boom tang
Ah rah rah ah boom tang, baby
Ah rah rah ah boom tang
Ah rah rah ah boom tang
Ah rah rah ah boom tang
Ah rah rah ah boom tang, baby
Ah rah rah ah boom tang
Soloist: My name is Debra
Group: Ah boom tang
Soloist: They call me Debbie
Group: Ah boom tang
Soloist: And when they see me
Group: Ah boom tang
Soloist: They say “Ah rah rah, you look good baby.” [do dance move while saying this]

(Repeat the entire chant with the next soloist, who says her name & nickname. Subsequent soloists may change the last line and may also do a different dance move than those which were previously performed.
-Tazi M. Powell (African American female, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, memories of mid 1980s)

Editor:
"Ah Rah Rah Ah Boom Tang" is a combination of an introduction cheer, and a dance style cheer. The steppers who I've seen perform this cheer usually just shake their hips back & forth to the beat while they say the last line of this cheer. However when this cheer is performed in front of adults or teens in a secure environment such as a school program or church sponsored community event, a soloist who risks doing a different dance step (such as pivoting to the back & then back to the front, or doing the Matrix (movie) leaning backwards motion gets immediate enthusiastic vocal approval from the audience. This approval is given while the performance is going on and may be in the form of exhortations of "Go 'head!"; "Do your thing!" ; "Yeah!". The same exhortations of approval are also given in those settings to soloist who slightly change but still keep the pattern & the theme of the soloist's end line. In this case, the theme was to brag about yourself (which in later years was to be called "to big up yourself") or brag about your dance skills. Therefore, end lines such as "Ah rah ah rah", you're my baby" or "Ah rah ah rah" I want you baby" would have clashed with the cheer's theme, and would not have been acceptable. However, end lines such as "Ah rah, ah rah, work it, baby" or "Ah rah ah rah, do it baby" (with "it" meaning the dance move) would be acceptable and would also fit the line's beat.

My recollection was that very few steppers had the confidence or desire to change the end soloist movement, and even fewer had the confidence or desire to change the movement and/or the end soloist line.That said, it's a great confidence builder to have the audience cheering for you while you do your soloist cheer. Girls certainly hope that that happens, even if it's just family and friends saying your name when the stepping group first comes out on the stage.

It should be noted that the audience behavior that is described here is very similar to that which occurs at African American Greek lettered fraternity/sorority step (or stroll) shows. Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/fraternity-sorority-step-stroll-related-... to find selected videos of those shows and some other groups' step shows.

****
BANANA BUMP BUMP BANANA
Banana
Bump Bump Banana
My name is Alfreda
Banana
Bump Bump Banana
We like to race.
Banana
Bump Bump Banana
Hey, I got rhythm.
I got soul.
I got something Toysha can't have.
Banana
Bump Bump Banana
-African American children (Houston, Texas) ; Barbara Michels, Bettye White, editors: "Apples On A Stick, The Folklore of Black Children" (Coward-McCann, Inc, 1983) p.35

Editor:
No performance instructions were given for any examples in Michels & White's book. However, I think this example "sounds like" a foot stomping cheer. Here is how I believe that example was performed:
Everyone (possibly excluding the soloist)
Bump Bump Banana
Banana
Bump Bump Banana
Soloist #1: My name is Alfreda
Group: Banana Bump Bump Banana
Soloist- We like to race
Group-Banana Bump Bump Banana
Soloist: Hey, I got rhythm.
I got soul.
I got something Toysha can't have.
Everyone including soloist: Banana Bump Bump Banana
-snip-

I think that this type of cheer provides opportunities for a small bit of improvisation. While subsequent soloist probably could say the same thing for what the group likes to do, probably the desired expectation was that each soloist say something different. I think that all other lines were the same, except for the use of the soloist's name or nickname and changing the name given at the end of the cheer to the name of the next soloist. Of course, this is just speculation, but it "feels" right to me.

****
BANG BANG CHOO CHOO TRAIN
Editor: All examples of foot stomping cheer versions of "Bang Bang Choo Choo Train" are posted here regardless of their title.

The popularity of this cheer can be attributed to its inclusion in the 2000 American movie Bring It On. From http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080507132224AAWcTcV

Question: "What is this song from bring it on.? it goes bang bang choo choo train lemme see you do your thang. the clovers sing it at the end of the movie bring it on 1

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-cheerleader-cheers for cheerleader cheers examples of Bang Bang Choo Choo Train. Also Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/schoolyard-taunts for schoolyard taunts examples of Bang Bang Choo Choo Train. This rhyme is often combined with "Brick wall Water falll" and/or other rhymes.

BANG BANG CHOO CHOO TRAIN (Version #1)
Group- Bang, Bang Choo Choo Train.
Watch Indonesia do her thang.
Soloist #1: I can’t.
Group: Why not?
Soloist #1: I can’t.
Group: Why not?
Soloist #1: Because my back is achin.
My bra’s too tight.
My hips keep movin’
from the left to the right
Group:Her back is achin.
Her bra’s too tight.
Her hips keep movin from the left to the right.
-African American girls ages 7-12 years; Braddock, Pennsylvania, [Alafia Children's Ensemble], 10/1997
-African American girls ages 7-12 years; Braddock, Pennsylvania, [Alafia Children's Ensemble], 10/1997 (Collected by Azizi Powell. 10/97; also collected by Azizi Powell from African American girls 7-12 years; Pittsburgh, PA on 11/2001 & on additional dates through 2005)

(Repeat chant with the next soloist who gives her name or nickname. The cheer continues with this pattern until everyone has had one chance as soloist.)

Note that the word "train" is pronounced like “trang” to rhyme with "thang". “Thang” is the hip-hop pronunciation for "thing".

Editor:
This chant was performed by girls ages 5-12 years old who were members of Alafia Children’s Ensemble, a cultural group for children ages 5-12 years that I conducted in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area from 1997-2006. The purpose of "Alafia" was to provide opportunities for girls and boys to explore the creative and performing arts potential of traditional, adapted, and contemporary, including originally composed African American children's rhymes & game songs. The rhymes were performed to the accompaniment of foot stomps, hand claps, Djembe (West African) drum, and an electric piano. "Show & Tell" was an important portion of the program. At that time, children were encouraged to share with the group examples of rhymes or cheers that they know. Needless to say, I used these opportunities to collect a number of rhymes and cheers, including "Bang Bang Choo Choo Train".

The girls who shared this chant said that they learned it from other girls, and that they had known it for a while. These girls were not at all embarrassed to mention the word “bra” in front of the women and men (staff, and relatives) or the elementary school aged boys that were present at our rehearsal. I must confess that I was more embarrassed than they were. After all, most of the girls who were reciting this chant were too young to even wear a bra! For the purposes of our community performances, for the sake of political correctness, I toyed with idea of changing the word “bra” to “skirt”. I finally decided to leave that word alone. However, I admit that when we performed for church social events, I didn't include this chant in our program :o) .

See examples of "Bang Bang Choo Choo Train" on Cocojam's Cheerleading Cheers page and on Cocojams'School Yard Taunting Rhymes page, and also examples of the rhyme that are combined with other rhymes and cheers.

****
CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG (Version #2 of Bang Bang Choo Choo Train)
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
Let's see ____ do her thang

Girl: "I can't"
Everybody: "Why not"
Girl: "I just can't"
Everybody:"Why not"

Girl: Cause my back hurt
My bra too tight
And my hips shake to the left
To the right
To the left
And to the right.

I loved this one!
(Who knew PMS started so young!)
-Nubian (Virginia by way of Texas, http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=5627; July 31, 2000

-snip-
From the comments on that discussion thread, these cheers and rhymes appear to come from the 1980s.

****
REESES PEANUT BUTTER CUP (Bang Bang Choo Choo Train; Version #3)
This is a song we always sang on the school bus when we went on class trips. It was during the mid- late 1990s in New Jersey. "Reeses Peanut Butter Cup" the group sings:

Reeses Peanut Butter Cup
Mess with me I'll beat you up
Bang bang choo choo train
Watch [a person's name]
do her thing.
the person answers: I can't
group: Why not?
person: Just can't!
group: Why not?
person: My back's achin'
My bra's too tight
My booty shakes from left to right
group: From the left To the right
To the left, right, left, right...

and then it starts over and the group picks a new person.
-Katie; 9/18/2006

****
BANG BANG CHU CHU TRAIN (Version #4)
it really goes like this in new york-
(1 person) bang bang chuchu train
let me see u do ur thing (
2 person) i cant
(1 person) why not
(2 person) my back aches
my belts to tight
and my booty is shakin from left to right
left right left, left right left
-m&m; 10/7/2006

****
MY BACK ACHES (Version #5 of Bang Bang Choo Choo Train)
My back aches: (My friend Cassidy... taught me this one too)

My back aches
my bra's too tight
my booty shake from left to right
awuga ah ah awuga
ah ah my feet hurt
they filled with dirt he says i look bad in that mini skirt awuga ah ah awuga ah ah i don't care what they say i'll mess you up anyway! awuga ah ah awuga bam!!!!
-Taylor; 10/27/2008

-snip-
The word "awuga ah" is probably a folk etymology form of "ungawa". That word is found in certain African American children's rhymes.

****
BULLDOG
a bulldog
a bulldog
say what
a bulldog
a bulldog
my name is candace
yeah
and i'm here to show u how i get down
First. she shack [shake] it
don't break it
and den she roll it
control it
den she pop it
don't stop it.
a bulldog a bulldog
-candace; 5/4/2006

Editor:
I placed this cheer on this page because I have seen almost the exact same cheer performed by a group of African American girls in Braddock, Pennsylvania {located near Pittsburgh, PA 1997-1999}. I also collected an example of this cheer in 2007 from two African American girls from Baldwin, PA {a suburb of Pittsburgh}.

Given my observations of that rhyme, I am convinced that this is an example of a foot stomping cheer because it [probably] adheres to the signature pattern of these types of cheers:
1 Each girl takes a turn being the soloist.
2 Everyone in the group says the first line "a bulldog. a bulldog.-say what-a bulldog. a bulldog
3. The first member of the 'group' says the soloist line "my name is Candace"
4. The rest of the group says "yeah"
5. The soloist continues with the line "and I'm here to show you how to get down"'
6. The soloist says " I [shake] it don't break it and den [then] I roll it control it, then I pop it. don't stop it." -[this line is omitted from the example but it may be indicated by the number 1.]
7. The rest of the group says "she shake it don't break it and den she roll it control it den she pop it don't stop it.
8. The entire group says: "a bulldog. a bulldog"

The group then repeats this pattern with the next soloist who -of course- says her name or nickname instead of Candace's name. The lines to this cheer are quite fixed.* However, the soloist might add the word "first" to the line " I shake it, don't break it".

After the second soloist ends, the rhyme is repeated again. This continues until everyone member of that informal group has had one turn as the soloist.

In cheers that are repeated word for word (except for your name or nickname and other perrsonal information), with the exception of young girls just learning how to do these cheers, it's considered to be bad form to repeat what someone has already said. For that reason, girls usually have a memorized repertoire of standard rhyming lines that they can draw from as their plan "b" in case someone whose turn is before them says the line they were thinking of using.

It's very important to emphasize that the words to foot stomping cheers are memorized before the cheer is performed. Once the beat starts, no one has time to think about what to say. If one person doing a cheer forgets the words to that cheer, or if that person tried to add words to a line, not only would she mess up her own performance of the beat, but, because this is a synchronized performance, she would mess things up for the entire group.

The other reason why the words to these cheers are fixed is that each member of the group has to have a turn as the soloist with that particular cheer. If a girl added lines to the cheer, she would be accused of trying to show off and trying to 'hog' the spotlight.
Note: I use "girl" in describing children who do foot stomping cheers since this is usually an activity performed by girls. But boys certainly can perform these cheers. Whether they do so is another matter.

C,D
CANDY GIRL (Version #1)
Everyone: Candy Girl.
All my world.
Look so sweet.
Special treat.
Soloist #1: This is the way we do The Bounce.

[Soloist does The Bounce while standing in the same spot and while continuing to chant]

Candy Girl.
Group: Do the bounce.
Do The bounce.

[The rest of the group does their version of The Bounce while standing in their same spot and while continuing to chant]

Soloist #1 All my world

[Soloist continues to do this dance for the reminder of this rendition of this chant]

Group: Do The bounce.
The bounce.

[The rest of the group continues to do this dance for the reminder of this rendition]

Soloist #1: Look so sweet.
Group: Do The bounce.
Do The bounce
Soloist #1 Special Treat.
Everyone: Candy Girl
All my world
Look so sweet
Special Treat
Soloist #2: This is the way we do The Snake

[Soloist does The Snake while standing in the same spot and while continuing to chant]

[Continue the same pattern as before with each new soloist naming and performing a different current or past favorite R&B/Hip-Hop dance. This continues until everyone in the group has had one turn as soloist.]
-Tazi M. Powell (African American female; remembrance of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the mid 1980s; transcribed by Azizi Powell in 1997 from an audio tape that I made in the mid 1980s of my daughter and her friends.

Tazi mentioned that if someone chose the dance "The Cabbage Patch". in order for the syllables of that dance name to fit the beat pattern, the group wouldn't say "The" and just say "do the Cabbage Patch/the Cabbage Patch".

I collected this exact same foot stomping cheer [with some different dance names] in 2000 from African American girls in that same age group in Braddock, Pennsylvania (about 10 miles from Pittsburgh. However, I'm not sure if this cheer is still performed in 2013 in Pittsburgh or its surrounding communities. When I did my last informal gathering of rhymes & cheers in 2007, few girls knew any of the foot stomping cheers from the 1980s and 1990s.

"Candy Girl" is based on the hit record by the R&B group The New Edition. That song has the same tune and the same lyrics as the cheer e cheer has the same lyrics (before the line "This is the way we do the ___).

****
CANDY GIRL (Version #2)
Candy girl,
all my world,
looks so sweet,
candy treat
This is the way
we do the (insert a dance)

Candy girl
Do the (dance) the (dance)

All my world
Do the (dance) the (dance)

Looks so sweet
Do the (dance) the (dance)

Candy treat
Do the (dance) the (dance)

(Repeat)

Directions:
This one involves the whole participation of the group at once. You repeat it for as many dances as you have until you can’t think of anymore.
- Jennifer (Korean), undergraduate female college student University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ; remembrances of rhymes she performed when she was 8-12 years ; (she indicates that she learned this from African American girls); collected in 2005 via email to Azizi Powell

Editor:
In 2005 my daughter, my pre-teen nieces, one of their girl friends of the same age, and I conducted a session on playground rhymes & cheers at Carnegie Library (main branch. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania). One of the college students in attendance talked with me afterwards. I gave her my email address, and she sent me this cheer (which she categorized as a "hand clap rhyme" and several others. I regret to say that I somehow misplaced the file for those rhymes, and didn't come across that file until April 2, 2011. If that student (now graduated I'm sure) happens upon this page, I hope that she accepts my sincere apologies to her for failing to post these examples until this time. See "Step by Step" and "Telephone" below for two other examples that Jennifer sent to me.

Jennifer described this example of "Candy Girl" as a "Handclap with dance". I wonder if her description that entire group participates as once means that the group decided what dances to do beforehand. In my opinion, this way of performing this cheer is a modification of the original "consecutive soloist" structure where each member took turns as a soloist, and came up with a different dance on the spot and not with prior knowledge of the rest of the group. The rest of the group would then all do the dance with the soloist.

****
CANDY GIRL (Version #3)
Candy girl, all my world,
look so sweet special treat
this is the way we (then they name a dance i.e the whop)
Candy girl
do the whop the whop
all my world
do the whop whop
look so sweet
do the whop the whop
special treat
do the whop the whop...
goes on with different dances mostly what is in at the time.
-Guest KLC,(East Harlem, New York, New York); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097 ; Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes? ; July 11, 2008

****
CAN YOU DIG IT
Group: So can you dig it?
Yeah
So can you dig it?
Group-Hey Maria [ earlier "Yo! Maria"]
Soloist #1: What [or "Yeah", An earlier version was "Yo, blood"]*
Group So can you dig it?
Soloist: What? [or "Yeah"]
Group- So can you dig it?
Soloist "Yeah"
My name is Maria
And I’m a flick flick.
And I’mma punch you in your lip.
I was sittin by the fire
watchin it get higher
with my man,
you understand.
Cause I’m a special kind of lady
with a special kind of man
I get to see my baby
WHENEVER I can.
Everyone-So can you dig it?
So can you dig it?
-African American girls, ages 6-12 years; Lillian Taylor Summer Camp; Pittsburgh, PA mid 1980s; collected by Tazi Powell

* ”Blood” is a no longer used African American vernacular referent for “a Black person”. Its use referred to the connection by blood that all Black people were said to have with each other (similarly to “blood brother. This informal referent has nothing to do with the Bloods street gang.

****
CHECK
Soloist: My name is Shelly
Others: Check
Soloist: They call me Shell
Others: Check
My horoscope is Aquarius
Others: Aquarius
Soloist: If you don't like
Others: Check
Soloist: Without a dial*
Others: Check
Soloist: Just call my number
and check me out.
Others: Check her out
Soloist: Cause I am fine.**
My number is 222-888**
Others: Check
Soloist: That fellow is mine **
Cause I know how to skate
Others: Well alright
Well alright
-Shelly H. (African American female, Cleveland, Ohio, mid 1980s), collected by interview by Azizi Powell, May 2007

[Repeat cheer from the beginning with the next soloist. That soloist says her name & nickname, and gives her astrological sun sign ("horoscope") and her phone number. In the " I like to ___" line, that soloist indicates what she is good at doing ("sing", "dance", "draw"). This pattern continues with the next soloist until everyone has had one turn as the soloist.

* "If you don't like without a dial" probably means "If you don't like it without a doubt"
** "Mine" and "fine" were elongated and sung-"my -i-i-n" ;"fi-i-i-n"

Editor: "Without a dial" probably is a folk etymology form of "without a doubt".

****
CHECK ME OUT
Group: Check me out
Check check me out
Check me out
Check check me out
Soloist (Tamia): My name is Tamia
Group: Check
Tamia: You mess with me
Group: Check
Tamia: and I’ll break your jaw
Group: Ol’ she think she bad.
Tamia: Honey child, I know I’m bad.
Group: Ol’ she think she fine
Tamia: Fine, fine Blow your mind,
Take your boyfriend any time.
Bring him home. Bring him back.
And make him have a heart attack.
- Tamia (African American female, Washington, D.C. area, 2001)
-snip-
Editor's Note: “Check me out means "Look at me". "Check" means ”Okay” or “Yeah”.

****
CHECK IT OUT (Example #1)
When I was growing up in Chicago in a primarily African-American neighborhood in the mid 70s (This was probably 1976-1978) we used to do a song where a small group of us would stand in a circle and take turns doing little dance solos with different body parts, for example if Jane, Susan and Mary were in the circle we would all sing:

"Jane's got the rhythm, rhythm in her arms" and while Jane would move her arms around we'd all sing "Umm, check it out, umm-umm check it out", then "Susan's got the rhythm, rhythm in her hips" and Susan would swivel her hips around while we all sang "Umm, check it out, umm-umm check it out" and on and on with each kid doing a different body part (head, legs, butt, waist, etc.) we all agreed in advance who would do each body part before we all started singing.

It's 35 years later and I still get that song stuck in my head sometimes and nobody here in California seems to have ever heard it...
-Guest, Jennifer Martin, http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=81350&messages=255
I'm Rubber . You're Glue: Children's Rhymes, February 3, 2012
-snip-
From Jennifer Martin's comments, it appears that this rhyme was done without any foot stomping motions. However, it's group voice/consecutive soloist structure is the same as the structure for foot stomping cheers. Also, my guess from the words of this rhyme and its accompanying actions is that Jennifer Martin is Black.

****
CHECK IT OUT
Hey Aunt Zizi, check it out
Hey Aunt Zizi, check it out
My name is ______
And I’m a star
You mess with me
I take you far

Ooh you think you bad
Correction, baby I know I’m bad

Ooh you think you cool?
Ooh child, please [pronounced as pul-LEEZE,
-Mime P. & Dee Dee P, (elementary school aged African American girls, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 2005
-snip-
Editor: This cheer was performed by my young nieces per my request of them to show me some rhymes or cheers that they know. The last line is performed by making the "stop" or don't even go their gesture - right arm extended face arm extended palmup in dismissive action toward the person and moving body slightly sieways, facing away from person-further dismissing them.

****
CHEERLEADER (Version #1)
All Cheerleader
Roll Call
Soloist #1:
Yolanda
They call me Lannie
Group: Hey Hey
Soloist #2:
Erica
They call me Ree Ree
Group: Hey Hey
Soloist #3: Ebony
They call me Ebony
Group: Hey Hey
Soloist #4: Melissa
They call me Missy
Group: Hey Hey

[{erformance instruction:The cheer continues in this pattern until everyone says their name and nickname. If the girl [or boy] doesn't have a nickname, the first name is repeated.
-Tazi M. Powell (African American girl; memories of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, early to mid 1980s

Editor:
A "roll call" is a list of names for members of a class or group. When the teacher “does the roll”, she calls out a student’s name, and the student whose name is called responds by saying “Here” or "Present."

This foot stomping cheer was (is?) performed by the girls standing in a horizontal line. The girls say the words to the cheer while they perform a bass sounding stomp stomp clap/ stomp stomp clap beat. ("Clap" means to clap your hands. There are no partners in foot stomping cheers and no physical touching of anyone else whatsoever)

****
CHEERLEADER (Version #2)
All: Cheer.
Leader.
Roll.
Call.
Are you ready?
Soloist #1: Shayla.
They call me Rosa.
Soloist #2: Shana.
They call me Poo.
Soloist #3: Shana.
They call me Shay.
Soloist #4: Jamie.
They call me Jay Jay.
Soloist #5: Jackie.
They call me HaJack (HighJack?).
All: Cheer.
Leader.
Zodiac signs.
Soloist #1: Aquarius.
That’s a dog.
Soloist #2: Cancer.
That’s a crab.
Soloist #3: Leo.
That’s a lion.
Soloist #4: Scorpio.
That’s a spider.
Soloist #5: Scorpio.
That’s a spider.
All: Cheer.
Leader.
Phone.
Numbers.
Are you ready?
Soloist #1: 348-5110.
Group: Always busy.
Soloist #2: 348-4554.
Group: Always busy.
Soloist #3 348-3322
Group: Always busy.
Soloist #4: 348-5779
Group: Always busy.
Soloist #5 348-4285
Group: Always busy.
-Shayla, Shana, Shana, Jamie, and Jackie {African American females about 10 years-12 years old}, Braddock, PA; 1985; collected by Azizi Powell, 1985 (transcription of audio tape recording)

Editor:
This version of Cheerleader uses the same stompstomp clap. stomp stomp clap” beat as versions #1. As is the case with most foot stomping cheers that I have observed and that I have collected online, the girls stood in a horizontal line. The order of soloist was decided by the fastest person to call "First!", "Second!" ect. The girls started the cheer a couple of times before every girl “got the beat”. Once everyone was “on beat” the chant began. That beat continues without any gaps throughout the entire cheer. If someone "messes up" by missing the beat or not chanting their soloist lines without hesitation and on beat, the cheer starts all over again from the beginning.

This version of Cheer Leader began with each girl saying her name and nickname. The group then returned to the Cheer Leader refrain, and then announcing another subject. The second subject was “Zodiac signs” (That order of subjects probably was fixed for this group of girls but could have been different for other groups of chanters). When the girls chanted the Zodiac Sign "verse", they didn't add “Are you ready?”. Instead, they moved right to the individual chants. One after another the girls responded to the announced subject by stating their astrological sun sign and its symbol. For the record, it should be noted that the girls gave the wrong information about the astrological symbol for Aquarius and Scorpio. The symbol for Aquarius is the water bearer and the symbol for Scorpio is the scorpion and/or the eagle. However, in my opinion, that erroneous information was and is actually quite immaterial to the aesthetic and folkloric richness of this example.

After the "verse" on astrological signs, the girls repeated the cheer leader refrain, and announced a new subject “telephone numbers”. After announcing that subject, the girls added “Are you ready?” However, this time the pattern changes. After each girl provided her telephone number (which are changed here in the interest of confidentiality), the group responded with the phrase “Always busy”. This inferred that the girl was very popular because she was always talking on the telephone. It should be noted that this cheer was performed before the days of the “call waiting” telephone feature that allows people to receive another telephone call when they are already talking to a previous caller. Because of this feature, busy signals are largely a thing of the past. Note also that this cheer was performed before phone numbers in Pittsburgh and its surrounding area included area codes. And that's a good thing, since putting those 3 number area codes in front of the 7 digit telephone number would probably have messed up the beat.

Presumably, the Braddock group of girls had performed this cheer together before, and knew what subjects to expect, and in which order to expect them. In order to maintain the steady beat, it would seem to me that the subjects and their order had to have been decided before the cheer begins. Also, the girls had to know without hesitation their responses to the subject matter. For instance, they each had to know their astrological sun sign before the cheer started. In this performance, some members of the group had ended the cheer with the “zodiac sign” portion. But a couple of the girls reminded the others about the “telephone number” section.

it's interesting to note that this cheer (as well as other foot stomping cheers) could have an open ended format. meaning its format could lend itself to the addition of new categories, and/or the substitution of one category for another. However, if that were the case, prior to starting the cheer, the group would have had to decide which categories were to be part of the cheer and when those categories would be introduced. To decide this after the cheer had started would disrupt the flow of the recitation and completely mess up the beat.

It's possible that this cheer could have any number of additional subjects, hence my earlier comment about it “approaching” an open-ended format.

This cheer is similar to the Bring It On II movie's cheer "Shabooya Roll Call". See a version of that cheer on Cocojam's Cheerleading Cheers page. It's possible that this cheer could have been one of the sources for that cheer. See additional versions of "Cheerleader" on this page.

Back in the mid to late 1980s, I got the impression that "Cheerleader Roll Call" foot stomping cheers were very widely known in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania among urban African American girls ages 6-12 years old.

I'm curious to know if any one remembers these cheers. If so, I'd love it if you would send in the version you remember. Along with the example, please also include some or all of this demographical information: when you remember these cheers {decade and not just how old you were unless you say how old you are now); where you were {city/state or nation if outside of the USA); what gender performed these cheers (girls only; girls & boys; or boys only}; and what race of ethnicity the children were who performed these cheers {such as Black, White, Latino). Thanks!!

****
CHOCOLATE CITY
[Start this beat pattern Stomp Clap, Stomp Stomp Clap, and everyone does this throughout this part of the cheer]

Group: Choc Lat City *
Choc choc Lat City
Choc lat city
Choc choc Lat City
1st Soloist- My name is Jayla [or "My name's Jayla"]
and I’m walkin
Group-She’s walkin
1st Soloist - I’m talkin [or " And I'm talkin"]
Group-She’s talkin
1st Soloist-I'm talkin to
Group-She's talkin to

[Change the beat to Stomp Stomp Clap; Stomp Stomp Clap and everyone does this throughout this part of the cheer] **

1st Soloist: All the boys in Choc Lat City
Get down with the nitty gritty
Some hittin me high
Some hittin me low
Some hittin me on my
Don’t ask what
Group-What?
1st soloist- My b u t t
b u t t
b u t t
butt.
That's what.
-African American girls, ages 6-12 years, Lillian Taylor summer camp, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, late 1980s, collected by Tazi M. Powell, from a Washington, D.C. African American girl who taught it to other campers ; also in 1999, Relene, age 12, and Chatauqua, age 10. African American girls, Fort Pitt School, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, collected by Azizi Powell

[Cheer repeats with a new soloist who says her name or nickname. This pattern continues until everyone in the group has had a soloist turn.]

* This cheer probably has its source in the Parliament's 1975 record "Chocolate City". Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZaVA3NS7zE for an example of that record.

The syllable "lat" in the word "Choco lat" rhymes with "fat" and "bat". "Chocolate City" is the nickname that African American have given to Washington D.C, because so many Black people live there.

**It should be noted that, to date, I haven't found another cheer that has a midway change to another beat.

Editor:
"Lillian Taylor Camp" was a well regarded summer camp in a county adjacent to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The camp was run by staff of the Pittsburgh (East Liberty neighborhood) based social service agency, Kingsley Association. Many African Americans over many decades atended that camp, particularly African Americans from the city's East End communities of East Liberty, Garfield, and Homewood. In the late 1980s, my daughter Tazi was a counselor at that camp for two summers. She had previously attended that camp as a pre-teen,

One summer, a major part of her responsibilites was helping the girls' groups prepare for their end of session performance. Sessions were every two weeks. These evening performances on the stage were attended by camp staff, campers, parents, and other adults. That year, and in other years, all of the girl groups performed a foot stomping cheer. Camp groups were divided by age and gender. Particularly after age 7, the girls in the group chose which cheer they wanted to perform. That summer a girl from Washington, D. C. who attended the camp along with her Pittsburgh cousins taught her group the "Chocolate City" cheer. My daughter told me that when she first heard that cheer, it sounded like some girls were saying "Chock the city" because they didn't understand the phrase "Chocolat City" . During subsequent sessions of that camp, some girls who had attended that previous camp session, taught the cheer to other girls. My daughter said that sme girls changed the cheer to "Pittsburgh City", in honor of their hometown. .

Fast forward to 1999 when my daughter was a teacher at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania elementary school in the Garfield section of the city. With the prior permission of its principal, I periodically visited that school's after-school program in order to collect playground rhymes and cheers from those students. A few years later, my daughter and I started a once a week game song group in that school as we had done in 1997 in a nearby city. Those two after school groups also provide opportunities to collect playground rhymes and observe children's performances of foot stomping and handclapping routines.

During one of those visits to that school in 1999, I collected the exact same words to "Chocolate City" with the exact same performance activity. My "informants" were two African American girls Relene, age 12, and Chatauqua, age 10. It's likely that those girls learned this rhyme from someone who had attended those Lillian Taylor Camp sessions.

****
DISCO (Version #1)
disco (stomp stomp stomp stomp clap)
(group) d-i-s-c-o thats the way we disco
(group) d-i-s-c-o thats the way we disco
(group) hey
samantha (solo) what
(group) sammy
(solo) huh huh
(group)what you gonna do
when they come for you
(solo) im gonna roll my eyes
(group) disco
(solo) stomp my feet
(group) disco
(solo) talk my stuff
(group) disco
(solo) and do my freaky nasty
(group) what what!?
(group) and do my freaky nasty

(repeat till everyone has a turn)
-samantag1993; 6/29/05

Editor:
The line "[bad boys] What you gonna do when they come for you" is lifted from the title of a song by the reggae band Inner Circle. The song was made popular by the television program COPS, where it is played during the opening title sequence." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bad_Boys_(Inner_Circle_song)

****
DISCO (Version #2)
Disco 2x [repeat two times]
Reeses pieces
reeses my pieces
(say sombodies name) what you ganna do
when they come for you
the person who's name was said says) i'm gonna step aside
disco
roll my eyes
disco
stomp my feet
disco and do the hilltoe
ah ha
and do the hilltoe.
-Ciera S.; Age 10; Pittsburgh, PA; 5/16/06

Editor:
This cheer has similar lines as the Version #1. The words "Reese Pieces" are probably a clip from the widely known handclap rhyme "Brick Wall Water Fall". The entire group says the words up to the line when the soloist says “I’m gonna step aside”. After that line, the rest of the group says “disco” and the soloists says the other words. “Hilltoe” is the R&B/Hip Hop dance “Heel Toe”.

****
DO IT! DO IT!
All:Do it! Do it!
Do it! Do it!
(Now) Freeze!
Now stop and let the first row kick it!
(The girls in the first row recite the next lines, the girls in the 2nd row stand in place in an agreed upon stance)

First Row: With the “Drop Top”
(All the girls in this row do their version of this R&B dance)
Second Row: Do it! Do it!
(All the girls in the second row do their version of the same dance along with the girls in the first row)

First Row: And the “Roll Your Body”
Second Row: Do it! Do it!

First Row: Do “The Butterfly”
Second Row: Do it! Do it!

First Row: Bust “The stop”
Second Row: Do it! Do it!

First Row: Shake your rump.
Group: Do it! Do it!

Do it! Do it!
Freeze!
Now stop and let the second row kick it!
(same pattern as above, with some of the same dances and some different dances-“The Pop”, “The Crybaby”, “The Rodeo”)
-African American girls, 8-10 years old, Alafia Children’s Ensemble (Braddock, Pennsylvania),1998; collected by Azizi Powell, 1998

Editor:
I typed this example with some spaces but there are no gaps in this cheer's performance. The rows were horizontal lines one behind the other. The dances or dance moves were those that were popular R&B/Hip/Hop dances during that period of time. I had not seen that cheer performed before that occassion, and haven't seen or read about it since.

Alafia (ah LAH fee ah) Children's Ensemble was a game song/foot stomping/ cheerleader cheer group that I started in 1997. Almost all the girls & boys in those after-school groups were African Americans between the ages of 5-12 years old.

****
DYNOMITE
...And this is another one from back then, even though, now I realize, the words are I'll say "risqué" for a young girl to say. Dynomite is just like "Giggalo" except the wording toward the end is different.

Dynomite Dynomite
Dy, dy-nomite
Dynomite Dy, dy-nomite
Hey {girl's name}
{girl responds}Yeah
Are you ready?
{girl responds}To what?
To dy {girl responds}
Dy what?
Dynomite
{girl responds}
Well... My hands up high
My bra too tight
Between my legs, I dynomite
I turn around
And touch the ground
And get back up
And break it down
-Becky H.; 5/1/2006

Editor:
Becky H mentions the cheer "Giggalo" that she also sent in to Cocojams. "Giggalo" is a very popular cheer/hand clap rhyme. Examples are posted below.

E, F
ELEVATE YOUR MIND
Elevate your mind (get yourself together)...
When I count to 3 do the __________ with me...
I said a 1, 2,3 do the ________ with me...
(everyone proceeds to do the ______ dance)
-AKA2D '91, http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=31403, 03-25-2003,

****
FLY GIRL
All: Fly girl
Fly girl
Fly girl One
Fly girl Two
Pump it up Teresa*
See what you do.
Soloist #1:(Oh) my name is Teresa
and I’m a fly girl
It takes a lot of men
to rock my world.
‘cause I can fly like a butterfly
sting like a bee
and that’s way they call me
Sexy

[The next soloist repeats the exact words of this cheer (except her name or nickname). Continue this pattern until every girl in the group has had a turn as the soloist.]
-Tazi M. Powell, (African American female, memories of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the mid 1980s; audio-tape made in late 1980s and transcribed in 1996) memories of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

* Substitute the soloist name or nickname.

Repeat the entire rhyme without pause, substituting the next soloist’s name or nickname; continue until everyone has had one chance of being the soloist.

Editor:
The term "fly girl" means a female is "hip" (street wise), "sexy", attractive, and always up to date with the latest "Black urban" clothing (and hair) fashions. "Fly Girl" is an example of a dance style cheer leader cheer. This cheer is inspired by the hit 1985 Boogie Boys' Rap song "Fly Girl".

"Fly Girl" is an example of a dance style cheer leader cheer. The "Fly Girl" foot stomping cheer appeared to have been very well known among African American elementary school & middle school aged girls during the mid 1980s Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. I have also read a few references online to this cheer in blogs, but, unfortunately, I didn't document those references

The "Fly Girl" foot stomping cheer was clearly inspired by the hit 1985 Boogie Boys' rap song "Fly Girl". The beat of the beginning of that song is absolutely perfect for foot stomping cheers. Indeed, the performace activity of foot stomping cheers were probably inspired by the percussive, bass sounding, metronome beats of Rap music. Foot stomping cheers also appropriated the commonly used pattern of each member of a rap group taking turns announcing his (or her) name and then saying something about themselves before giving the microphone to the next group member. This pattern, and this foot stomping cheer's beginning words "fly girl, fly girl" are directly lifted from that 1985 Boogie Boys record.

Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yEfg6XU9tdQ to hear the Boogie Boys record "Fly Girl".

Also, click for a http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGaOlfmX8rQ video of the words and song of the hit Rock record by Queen "We Will Rock You" that also has a perfect beat for foot stomping cheers. Cocojams' Cheerleading Cheers page has a number of examples of cheerleading cheers whose words (and tunes) are very closely based on that song. Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-cheerleader-cheers for that page.

As aways, please be aware that some comments in YouTube comment threads my contain profanity, or otherwise offensive content.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/01/fly-fly-girl-slang-definition-ex... for a post on my pancocojams blog about the slang terms "fly" and "fly girl".

**
Additional editorial comments:
I don't mean to imply that all or many of the words of foot stomping cheers were inspired by rap music. R&B records probably inspired more foot stomping cheers than Rap music. Among the 1980s foot stomping cheers that were inspired by hit Rhythm & Blues songs are "Other foot stomping cheers such as "Get Down", "Hollywood Swingin" and "Candy Girl". I don't know whether any foot stomping cheers are inspired by recorded music in the 1990s and 2000s.

Actually, I don't know that many foot stomping cheers from the 1990s and 2000s.* I'm hoping Cocojams readers send in examples to cocojams17@yahoo.com

**
The line "fly like a butterfly/sting like a bee" is a variant form of Muhammad Ali's rap "Float Like A Butterfly". Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/10/two-muhammad-ali-raps-this-is-le... for information about and the words to that Muhammad Ali's rap and his earlier rap "The Legend Of Cassius Clay".

Click for a post on my cultural blog about the words "fly" and "fly girl".

G, H
GET DOWN (Version #1)
All : I saida D-O-W-N. That’s the way we get down.
D-O-W-N. That’s the way we get down.
Group: Hey, Danielle. (insert 1st girl's name)
Danielle: What?
Group: Show us how you get down.
Danielle: No way.
Group: Show us how you get down.
Soloist: Okay. I said D-O-W-N.
And that’s the way. That’s the way. That’s the way
I get down.
Group: She saidah D-O-W-N. And that’s the way.
That’s the way. That’s the way she gets down.

Performance instruction: Repeat the entire cheer with next soloist who says her name. This continues from the beginning until everyone has had a turn as soloist.
-Tazi M. Powell.; memories of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, late 1980s, early to mid 1990s; Collected by Azizi Powell

Editor:
When the soloist says "that's the way I get down", she does some fancy step or dance movement. When the group says "That's the way she gets down", they are doing the same step or movement as the soloist. Each soloist tries to do something different from the dance or steps that other people ahead of her have done.

I'd love to know if this cheer is still being done nowadays. See Cocojams' Cheerleader page for a similar cheer.

****
GET DOWN (Version #2)
QuartQuart hey (insert a name)
Hey what?(2*) show me how to get down.
No way show me how to get down
okay.
Hands up high
feet down low
this is how I rodeo.
(repeat but at the end say ) hands up high
feet down low
this is how I drop it low.
drop it low drop drop it low.
-QuartQuart; 4/23/2006

****
GIGALO
Click http://cocojams.com/content/childrens-game-songs-and-movement-rhymes for examples of this rhyme which may also be labeled a cheer.

****
GIVE IT TO ME
give it to me (this is a stomp and cheer) give it to me 1 time (stomp
,clap)
2 times (stomp stomp clap)
3 times (stomp stomp clap stomp)
again (stomp stomp clap stomp)
break it down now (stomp clap stomp stomp clap stomp stomp clap stomp.... stomp clap

(repeat once more)
-erika; 10/26/2006

****
HEY LADIES
This is game called "Hey Ladies" A circle game. All the girls get in a circle, and a solo person starts saying this: "Hey ladies all break down with the (whatever dance move the want to do and they do it, and while doing it she says "boom boom chick boom ba boom chick" (repeat 1 time)).

Then the group says: "all break down with the boom boom chick boom ba boom chick" repeat 1 time. and then they do the same dance move the solo person just did. You keep going around the circle, so that everyone has a chance at a solo. I did this at my elementary school in Massachusetts, and mostly african american girls would participate
-kamyra; 3/29/2007

Editor:
See an example of Boom Chicka Boom above for a similar cheer.

****
HEY MY NAME IS ___
we sing this when we do warm up running before a field hockey game

person:hey my name is katie and you kno what i got??
group:uh huh??
person: i got a team thats hotter than hot group:
uh huh?? person: good d(defense) and offense too.
group: uh huh uh huh.
person: were gunna kick the whoopsies outta you!!!!

then take turn until the whole group is finished
-kate: 11/23/2006

****
HOLLYWOOD SWINGING
Editor: "Hollywood Goes Swinging" (also known as "Hollywood Now Swinging" and other similar names) is one of the few foot stomping cheers that I observed in person, and that I have found in a record, in a published book, and that I have also found additional examples of online.

This cheer has its source in Kool & The Gang's 1973 R&B song "Hollywood Swinging" . The song became their first number one R&B single, reaching that position in June of 1974. It proved to also be a successful crossover hit, peaking at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD-VvbGa8H4 to find that video and read more information about this song.

For the purpose of folkloric documentation, I'm posting versions of "Hollywood Swinging" foot stomping cheer that I've observed, heard on a record, read in a book, and found online. It's fascinating to see the similarities & differences between each of these versions of the same cheer. Note that in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, it appears that this "foot stomping cheer" has evolved into a handclap game. In my admittedly informal research, I've found very few people who remember that "Hollywood Swingin" used to be performed as a foot stomping cheer. And some African American girls I've asked about this rhyme in 2010 and 2011 (for instance see the entries in Cocojams's Handclap page from Naijah) say that they have heard of this rhyme but don't remember it. Other African American girls in Pittsburgh who I've specifically asked about this rhyme say that they don't know it at all.

See "Hollywood Goes Swinging" on Cocojam's Handclap Rhymes page:
http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes

**
HOLLYWOOD NOW SWINGING' / DYNOMITE (Version #1)
Hollywood now swingin'! (4 times)
CALL: Name is Nita.
RESPONSE: Hollywood now swingin'!
Similarly
I know how to swing.
Everytime I swing.
Stevie come around.
CALL: He popped me once!
He popped me twice!
All I felt was - dynomite!
RESPONSE: Dynomite, dynomite! (Twice)
Dynomite!
CALL: Here she is.
RESPONSE: Dynomite!
Similarly
Foxy Brown!
You mess with me,
I'll shoot you down!
Down, down,
To the ground,
Up, up,
CALL: Just out of luck!
RESPONSE: Dynomite, dynomite! (Twice)
-Barbara Borum and other Washington, D.C. schoolgirls, recorded in 1976 in Washington, D. C. by Kate Rinzler, album notes Kate Rinzler, "Old Mother Hippletoe, Rural and Urban Children's Songs"; http://www.newworldrecords.org/linernotes/80291.pdf ; 1978

Editor:
The 1978 vinyl record "Old Mother Hippletoe, Rural and Urban Children's Songs" contains the earliest documented examples of foot stomping cheers that I have found to date. That record includes five examples under the category of "Cheerleading".(Note that I'm considering "Hollywood Now Swingin" and "Dynomite" as two separate compositions). The titles of the cheers in that 1978 record are "Think"; "Your Left", "Cheering Is My Game", and Hollywood Now Swingin' /Dynamite". "Your Left" is the only one of those examples which is not written with a call & response structure.

Of those five examples, I would definitely categorize "Cheering Is My Game" and "Hollywood Now Swingin' as foot stomping cheers . The structure of those two cheers and, to a great extent, the performance instruction that is described for those cheers, mark them as "foot stomping cheers". Furthermore, additional examples of both of those cheers are posted on this page.

Lines from "Dynomite" are included in other examples of foot stomping cheers as well as in other examples of children's cheerleader cheers. See the example of "Dynamite" on this page and click http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-cheerleader-cheers to find cheers with the title "Dynamite" and "We're Dynamite".

It's likely that "Think" is also a foot stomping cheer, but I've not yet come across any other examples of that cheer online or in books/records. In my opinion, the remaining example "Your Left" is a cheerleader cheer that has its source in the "Sound Off" military cadence. Lines from that cheer are found in various children's cheerleader cheers.

As a reminder, the referent "foot stomping cheers" is the term that I created in 1999 for a distinctive structure of children's cheerleader cheers and a distinctive cheerleader cheer performance activity. That term isn't found in the "Old Mother Hippletoe" album notes. Instead, the examples included in that record are presented under the title "Cheerleading". Click that pdf file whose address is given above to find more information about those examples.

****
HOLLYWOOD ROCK SWINGING (Version #2)
Hollywood rock swinging
Hollywood rock swinging
My name is Aniesha
I'm number one
My reputation is having fun
So if you see my just step aside
'Cause mighty Aniesha don't take no jive

Hollywood rock swinging
Hollywood rock swinging
My name is Katrina
I'm number two
My reputation is me and you
So if you see me just step on back
'Cause mighty Katrina don't take no slack

Hollywood rock swinging
Hollywood rock swinging
My name is Natasha
I'm number twelve
My reputation is ringing that bell
So if you see me just step aside
'Cause mighty Natasha don't take no jive
-Barbara Michels, Bettye White, editors: "Apples On A Stick, The Folklore of Black Children" (Coward-McCann, Inc, 1983) p.14

Editor:
A notation in the book "Apples On A Stick" indicates that these examples are from "African American school children, Houston, Texas." The editors didn't provide any performance information about these examples. I believe that this may be a foot stomping cheer because that's the way this composition was performed in the 1980s in Washington, D.C. and in Pittsburgh, Pennsyvania. However, by the late 1990s, "Hollywood Swingin" appears to have been as a patner handclap routine, and nobody I interviewed then didn't remember it ever having been performed as a foot stomping cheer. Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes to find examples of those hand claps.

****
HOLLYWOOD GOES SWINGING (Version #3)
All:
Hollywood goes swinging.
Swinging for the good times.
Swinging for the bad times

Soloist #1
My name is Ebony.
(And) I’m cool and the gang.
You mess with me
and I’ll do my thang.
My sign is Libra
and that’s alright
cause all Libra’s
are out of sight.

All:
Hey you,
check it out!
You! You!
Check it out!
-Tazi M. Powell , memories of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, mid 1980s; transcribed from audio tape by Azizi Powell, 1996

Instructions:
Repeat cheer with next soloist who gives her astrological sun sign. The cheer continues until everyone in the group has had one turn as the soloist.

Editor:
The group members decide the order of soloists by the fastest ones to shout out 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc then form a line in that order and begin stepping for a short while before they begin reciting the cheer to make sure that everyone is on-beat.

My daughter remembered performing it when she was around 12 or 13 years old in 1985-1986. She also recalls hearing girls perform this cheer when she was a counselor for Kingsley summer camp, (Pittsburgh, PA) in 1989 and1990.

I've read other examples of this rhyme with the first line "Hollywood Rock Swingin", and "Hollywood Swinging". That last title is the actually title of the R&B group Kool & The Gang's song which is the source of this children's rhyme.
-snip-
Click http://cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes for additional examples of "Hollywood Swinging" that are performed as handclap rhymes.

****
HULA HULA (Version #1)
Hula hula
Now who thinks they bad
Hula hula
Now who thinks they bad
I think I’m bad
‘Cause Acie my name
And toys is my game
Take a sip of my potion
And dance in slow motion
Uh-huh
She thinks she bad
Baby baby don’t make me mad
Un-huh
She thinks she cool
Baby baby don’t act a fool
Uh-huh
She think she sweet
Sweetest person you ever meet
Uh-huh
She thinks she fine
Baby baby I’ll blow your mind
-Barbara Michels and Bettye White, Editors: Apple On A Stick, The Folklore of Black Children ( Putnam Juvenile; First Edition November 11, 1983)

The editors of that book indicate that the rhymes they collected were from school girls in Houston, Texas. However, no information is provided about how this rhyme (or any other rhyme in that collection) was performed. Yet, the pattern of this example fits the mold of a foot stomping cheer {one person responds several times to a question that another person or persons makes and that person or persons responds back to her}. Of course, the Pittsburgh example of "Hula Hula", that starts the same and has similar lines, presents the strongest case that this is the Houston example of "Hula Hula" is what I refer to as a foot stomping cheer.

Of course, just because the text of these two examples are so very much alike doesn't meant that the performance activity has to have been the same. For instance, the Houston example could have been recited while doing handclaps or while jumping rope instead of while doing a foot stomping routine. Or all three of these performance activities could have been used by different populations of children-in different cities, or within the same city but in different neighborhoods. Unless someone documents the way/s that a rhyme is performed by children in a specific place at a specific time (say, the 1980s, or early 2000s), there's no guaranteed way of knowing this information.

I've been trying, without any success, to get in touch with the editors of that book. If they or anyone who they know is reading this, please, contact me at cocojams17@yahoo.com.. Thanks!!

I believe that the word "hula" in the cheer "Hula Hula" means "Hey!" (as in "Hello"). "Hula" may have come from the Spanish word "Hola". But I think that "Hula" might actually be a form of the old time English greeting "How do" meaning "How do you do?". The word "howdy" is a more common English language form of "How do you do". The television clown "Howdie Doody" got his name from the phrase "How do you do".). The colloquial American greeting phrase "Hoodie Hoo" is another form of the phrase "Howdy do." and may also have been a source for the word "Hula" in this cheer. "Hoodie Hoo" is pronounced "who day who".

For a related piece of information, click http://voices.yahoo.com/february-20-hoodie-hoo-day-5435649.html to find information about a newly invented American holiday to chase away winter by going outside on February 20th and yelling "Hoodie Hoo!".

To be clear, in the context of these cheers I definitely don't think that the word "hula" has anything to do with "hula' dances or "hula hoops".

I saw "Hula Hula" performed by my daughter and her friends, and other African American girls in the mid 1980s in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. But I don't know how widespread the rhyme was in that city. I'm unsure if this cheer is still performed in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. I'm also unsure if this rhyme is still performed in Houston, Texas, and how widespread it is (or was) there.

If you know this cheer/rhyme or any cheer or rhyme that is similar to it, please send it in to Cocojams, and please include where, when, and how it was performed! Thanks!!

****
HULA HULA (Version #2)
Group: Hula Hula.
Who think they bad?
Soloist #1: I do.
Group: Hula Hula.
Who think they bad?
Soloist #1: I do.
Well, I think I’m bad cause
Keisha's my name
and love is my game.
I got this boy on my mind
and Lord knows he’s fine.
I got his name on my shirt
and don’t call it dirt.
Group: Ooh, she thinks she’s bad.
Soloist #1:Correction, baby, I KNOW I’m bad.
Group: Ooh, she thinks she’s fine.
Soloist #1: Fine enough to blow YOUR mind.
-Tazi M. Powell (African American female, Pittsburgh, PA, mid.1980s; Collected by Azizi Powell,1992 from observing a demonstration of this cheer

Editor:
"Hula Hula" is a combination introduction and confrontation style foot stomping cheer.
Hula Hula’s" beat is stompclap; stompstompclap. This appears to be the most commonly used cheer beat. The cheer continues without any break in the chanting or the stepping until everyone has had one turn as soloist.

In this foot stomping cheer, when the group asks “Who thinks they bad?”, the soloist quickly says “I do”. “Bad” is an African American slang term for “very good.”

When the group says “and when I twist like this”, they are doing a hip shaking motion. And when they say “I break down like a worm”, they are really showing off their best (and sexiest) dancing skills. At this time, the girls don't have to do the same dance, or they don't have to do the same dance the same way. When the cheer begins with the next soloist, they will all return right back to the synchronized step.

****
HULA HULA (Version #3)
Voice #1 (Nyya): Hula Hula.
Who think they bad?
Voice #2 (Ritza): I do.
Voice #1 (Nyya): Hula Hula.
Who think they bad?
Voice (Ritza) #2: I do.
Well, I think I’m bad cause
Ritza's my name
and pink is my color
Don't you worry 'bout my brother.
Voice #1 (Nyya): Ooh, she thinks she’s fine.
Voice #2 (Ritza):Soloist #1:Correction, baby I know I’m bad.
Voice #1 (Nyya): Ooh, she thinks she’s hip.
Voice #2 (Ritza):Hip enough to steal your chips.
-Naturalandthecity; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0pnufDOxgU&feature=endscreen&NR=1; Dec 17, 2011

Here's that video:

Hula Hula! Who think she bad?

Uploaded by Naturalandthecity on Dec 22, 2011

hula hula! Who think she bad?

-snip-
In this rhyme, the two chanters say the words with a bit of street flavor, but their diction is probably too mainstream American to be really "bad" in the street sense of that word.
Also notice that no foot stomping routine accompanies their chanting.

It's interesting how some rhymes and chants survive almost intact over decades, while others survive with considerable changes, and even more totally disappear. The earliest examples of "Hula Hula" that I've found are from the 1980s. Those two examples are very similar, and come from two very geographically distant states in the USA. The example given above from 2011 has the same call & response pattern and almost the same wording as those from the 1980s.

****
HULA HULA (Version #4)
(Group): Hula Hula.
Who think she's bad?
(Girl) : I do.
(Group): Hula Hula.
Who think she's bad?
(Girl) : I do.
I think I am bad cause [insert name] is my name
and [insert color] is my color, don't you worry 'bout no other.
(Group) :Ew, she thinks she’s bad.
(Girl) Honey, Honey I know I’m bad.
(Group) :Ew, she thinks she’s fine.
(Girl): Fine enough to blow your mind.
http://www.cfa4kids.com/docs/CFA_Cheers.pdf ; retrieved 1/11/2012 (no information given about the poster)

Editor:
One of the ways that African American cheers from the oral tradition survive is because they are picked up by mainstream culture, albeit the text and the performance activity of those cheers are usually changed in that process.

This example came from a pdf file of cheerleader cheers and is listed under the category "Name Cheers". Notice that this example retains the non-standard call and response pattern with the group voice being heard first. However, there is an uneven use of vernacular and standard English, and the lines given in standard English would probably harm the foot stomoing beat. For example, the line "I think I am bad cause [insert name] is my name") . Also notice that unlike the other examples, "ooh" (which rhymes with the English word "who") is given as "eww". The, perhaps subtle, difference between these two words is that "ooh" conveys that a verbal challenge has been heard and is being responded to while "eew" (which also rhymes with "who") has has a yucky, icky connotation. And "Honey honey" is also inauthentic, meaning African Americans don't repeat that word when it is being used in confrontation, put down circumstances such as that acted out by this chant.

It's interesting that such confrontational cheers are being adopted by cheerleading squads as those types of cheers are quite different from mainstream concept of perky, smiling cheerleaders who are supposed to lead fans in cheering for their sports team. In standard cheerleading cheers, the focus is on the sports team and the game, and secondarily on the fans. In contrast, in footstomping cheers, the focus on the individual girl and her relationship with others. It's no wonder that many people in the world of mainstream cheerleading are opposed to the introduction of foot stomping cheers (and stomp and shake cheers).

****
HUMP DE DANDA (Version #1)
Editor: For the record, I'm posting this cheer on 4/23/2008 some time after the version that Tia sent in on 8/25/05. It's possible that Tia's version was from the same section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania that my daughter's version comes from. Note the similarities & differences between these two versions.

Entire Group: Hump De Danda
Hump Hump De Danda
Hump De Danda
Hump HumpDe Danda
Soloist #1: (Well) My name is Toya.
Group: De Danda, Hump Hump De Danda
Soloist #1: I’m super cool.
Group: De Danda Hump, Hump De Danda
Soloist #1: You mess with me
Group: De Danda Hump, Hump De Danda
Soloist #1: and you’re a fool.
Group: De Danda Hump, Hump De Danda
Soloist #1: I’m goin down
Group: De Danda Hump, Hump De Danda
Soloist #1: to touch the ground.
Group: De Danda, Hump, Hump De Danda
Soloist #1: I’m comin up
Group: De Danda, Hump Hump De Danda
Soloist #1: to mess you up.
Entire Group: Humpty Dumpty
sat on ah wall
Humpty Dumpty
had a great fall.
Oosh, ain’t that funky now.
Oosh, aint that funky now.
Oosh, ain’t that, Oosh ain’t that
Oosh, ain’t that funky now.
- African American girls (ages 6-12 years old; Lillian Taylor camp, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, collected by Tazi Powell, 1992 or 1993 (transcribed from audio tape by Azizi Powell, 1997)

(Repeat the entire cheer with the next soloist)

****
HUMP DE DUMP (Version #2 of Humpty Danda)
I am a cheerleading coach in Ga, I moved here from Pittsburgh (East Liberty) when I was about 10. We used to do all of the street cheers that you have listed back during the mid 80's, they brought back wonderful memories and that is something that I do not remember the girls from down south doing once we got here. I remember one called "Humpty de Dump"-
hump de dump,
hump, hump, de dump
my name is is___,
de dump, hump, hump, de dump
and if you watch me,
de dup, hump, hump, de dump,
I'll show you you I'm cool
de dump, hump, hump, de dump.
(Then you do your dance)
-Tia; 8/25/05

I,J
I’M A STAR
I remembered this cheer from when I was little. (Say this with attitude)

You say: "My name is _________ and I'm a star
you mess with me I'll take you far."
Others say: "Woo, she thinks she's bad."
You say: "Correction baby, I know I'm bad."
Others say: "Woo, she thinks she's bad."
You say: "Child, please!"

(As you say the last line, you put your hand up as if motioning "stop") You repeat this cheer until everyone on the squad has had a turn.
-kelly, 9/27/2006
-snip-
"Child please" is a put down statement that is spoken in a dismissive tone. That stamen is often accompanied by the giving someone the "talk to the hand" gesture - the person speaking puts her right hand to the side of her face and turning her face away from the person she is addressing. Her face is usually expressionless.

****
INTRODUCE YOURSELF (Version #1)
Group: Hey, Shaquala!
Soloist #1: Yo! *
Group: Innn-TRO-duce yourself. **
Soloist #1: No way.
Group: Innn-TRO-duce yourself. **
Soloist #1: Okay.
My name is Shaquala.
Group: Hey! Hey!
Soloist #1:They call me Quala.
Group: Hey! Hey!
Soloist #1: My sign is Aries
Group: Hey! Hey!
Soloist #1: I like to dance
Group: Hey! Hey!
Soloist #1: I wanna be a dancer for the rest of my life.
-T.M.P.; Pittsburgh, PA mid. 1980s; transcribed from audio tape by Azizi Powell, 1997

Repeat the entire cheer from the beginning with the next soloist. Each soloist substitutes her first name or nickname and provides information in the same categories such as her first name, her nickname, her astrological sun sign, what she likes to do. The cheer continues from the beginning until every member of the group has had one turn as soloist.

* When the African American interjection "Yo!" was dropped from usage in the late 1980s, the soloist's part was changed to “What?”; These words were spoken in a scornful "what are you botherin me for" tone, and not in a questioning manner.

** The word "introduce" was elongated so that it was pronounced "innn-TRO-duce". The word "yourself" was said the standard way.

Editor:
“Introduce Yourself” is a cheer that my daughter TMP remembers performing when she was about 10 years old. She said that she learned it from other girls. This cheer uses the standard beat used by most foot stomping cheers:
“Stomp Stomp Clap; Stomp Stomp Clap.”

This is an example of an "Introduction style" foot stomping cheer (to use the general term and the sub-category term that I coined). Introduction style foot stomping cheers are those whose text and whose primary purpose is to introduce the girls to an often non-existent audience. In every introduction cheer that I have collected the soloists give their first names and usually provide some other information about themselves such as their nicknames, astrological signs, their favorite color, their favorite sport, their boyfriend's name, their boyfriend's astrological sign, and/or the athlete team the girl is a cheerleader for (or is pretending that she is a cheerleader for).

The girls usually determines the order of the soloists by the first persons to say "First! Second! Third! etc. This order of soloist usually remains for all the cheers that this "group" does during that particular time.

Foot stomping cheers are memorized. There's little no improvisation as this could easily interfere with the performance of the cheer's synchronized, percussive routine. Besides, each girl is waiting her turn to be the soloist/star. And each soloist gets the same amount oftime. Any attempt to change the words of cheers known to other girls in the group and any suggestion about changing the way a cheer is performed would probalby be met with charges that the soloist is “saying it {the cheer} wrong” or "messing up" the way the cheer is "supposed to be" done.

I've found that if a girl doesn't know the words to a particular cheer, or if she's not sure about how to do the foot stomping routine (which is usually pretty standard), she will usually "sit out" that cheer {meaning, move away from the girls performing it} and watch the performance until she's confident that she "knows" that cheer. To do otherwise is to court disfavor from the other girls since one person who says or does a cheer wrong or who hesitates on the words or movement routine will "mess up" the cheer for the entire group.

Technically speaking, a “program” of footstomping cheers would begin with one introduction cheer. However, since these cheers are mainly performed "for fun" on the sidewalks outside one of the girl's home, the girls start with whichever cheer they decide on. For that reason, an introduction cheers may actually be "done" during the beginning, middle or end of their “program”. There could be more than one introductory cheer, or no examples of that type of foot stomping cheer could be done at all during that particular session. (BTW, I've found that African American girls in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area say that they "do" these cheers. They never say that they "play" cheers. African American children in the Pittsburgh area also say that the "do" handclaps, and never say that they "play" handclaps.)

****
INTRODUCE YOURSELF (Version #2)
...[this] is not really a clapping game, but this thread reminded me of it. The kids play this and insert their names and a little something about themselves...

Everyone:
Jump in (clap clap)
Jump out (clap clap)
In-troduce yourself (clap clap)
(clapping continues)
Person who jumped in and out:
My name is Stephanie (yeah)
And I'm a drama queen (uh-huh)
I like to sing (yeah)
And I like chocolate cake (uh-huh, uh-huh, uh-huh).

It can get pretty amusing to see what the kids have to say about themselves.
-Frozen Chosen; http://msgboard.snopes.com/message/ultimatebb.php?/ubb/get_topic/f/95/t/... ; Skipping and clapping rhymes; February 13, 2003
-snip-
In African American culture "drama queen" is a negative referent for a female who tries to get all of the attention and spotlight by doing things too dramatically.

****
INTRODUCE OURSELF [GAMMA PHI BETA CHEER] (Version #3 of Introduce Yourself)
We had a CLC visit last fall, and she taught us the following chant. It is a respond chant. 1 is the people leading the chant, and 2 is the respondants.

1. Hey Gammies
2. Yeah!
1. Hey Gammies
2. Yeah!
1. Introduce yourselves
2. Right on! (fist pump towards the sky)
1. Introduce yourselves
2. Right on (fist pump towards the sky)
(everyone clapping)
We are the gammies, yeah, and we are so proud, yeah
That's why yell, yeah, so very loud, and say
Hey, Hey, Hey!! (3 quick fist pumps)
(repeat from beginning)

Our chapter really enjoys this.....so I figured I'd leave it for others to see....

IIKE,
Sarah (Epsilon Sigma; Morehead State University, Kentucky) http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=32351&page=3; 02-26-2005
-end of quote-
This is a sorority cheer. My sense is that Gammas Phi Beta is a White or majority White universtity sorority. I believe that "CLC" stands for "cheerleading coach". It would be interesting to learn how that coach learned this cheer. Note that "everyone clapping" means that the clapping is done throughout this portion of the song and not "to the beat" as is done with African American songs/chants/cheers.

*****
INTRODUCE YOURSELF (Version #4)
Introduce yourself
to shy
introduce yourself
I try my name (say your name)
yeah
I cheer for (say who you cheer for)
my sign is (say your sign)
and when I'm up I'm hot stuff
And when I'm down don't mess around
and when I'm me don't scream or shout
or you'll get knocked out!
-De'ajaih; (African American girl; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania); 5/16/2006

****
INTRODUCE YOURSELF (Versions #5)
{I hope its good}

hey (name)
hey what
introduce yourself,
no way,
introduce yourself
ok
1 2 3 4 5 my name is (name)
and i say hi
6 7 8 9 10
back it up and meet my friend
Hey (name)
hey what
introduce yourself
no way
introduce yourself ok
1 2 3 4 5
my name is (name)
and i say hi
6 78 9 10
back it up and meet my friend
hey (name)
hey what
introduce yourself
no way
introduce yourself
ok
shaboo ya sha sha shaboo ya roll call
my name is (name)
i cheer so strong
and so when i shake
you better bring it on
shaboo ya sha sha shaboo ya
break it down now
-tiffany; 9/28/2006

Editor:
Here's a video clip of "Introduce Yourself" from Bring It On, All Or Nothing movie:

intro youself

tanngax24, Uploaded on Oct 9, 2006

-snip-
The Bring It On: All Or Nothing performance movement for this cheer has been greatly modified from the "traditional" percussive foot stomping routine. Furthermore, the treatment of the soloist at the end -" Sierra quits when she realized they've stopped" - is absolutely counter to the traditional treatment by the group of all soloists as equal in time and respectful attention.

****
INTRODUCE YOURSELF (Version #6 from the "Bring It On-All Or Nothing" film)
Britney: Hey Amber.
Amber: Hey what?
Everybody: Introduce yourself!
Amber: No way!
Everybody: Introduce yourself!
Amber: Ok... 1,2,3,4,5,
my name is Amber and I say "hi".
6,7,8,9,10, back it up and meet my friend.
Hey Winnie!
Winnie: Hey what?
Everybody: Introduce yourself!
Winnie: No way!
Everybody: Introduce yourself.
Winnie: Ok. 1,2,3,4,5,
my name is Winnie and I say "hi".
6,7,8,9,10, back it up and meet my friend.
Hey Britney.
Britney: Hey what?
Everybody: Introduce yourself!
Britney: No way.
Everybody: Introduce yourself!
Britney: Ok.
Sha boo ya, sha sha sha boo ya, roll call.
My name is Britney. I cheer so strong.
And when I shake it,
you better bring it on.
Sha boo ya, sha sha sha boo ya, break it down now.
Sierra: I'm Sierra! And...
[Sierra quits when she realized they've stopped]
- Source: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0490822/quotes Memorable quotes for Bring It On: All or Nothing (2006

****
INTRODUCE YOURSELF (Version #7)
group: Hey (name)
individual: yeah
group: introduce yourself
individual: no way
group: introduce yourself
ind.: ok...
my name is (name)
group: yeah
ind.: and i am proud
group: yeah
ind.: thats why i cheer
group: yeah
ind.: so very loud,
so check me out
- Janice, (San Francisco, CA) 10/11/2006

****
INTRODUCE YOURSELF (Version #8)
hey gigi
hey what
hey gigi
hey introudce your self
i can't
why not
because my back is aching skirt is to tight you
got my booty shaking from the left to the right
-gigi; 2/14/2007

****
INTRODUCE YOURSELF (Versions #9)
sorta funny/lame but cool: (in a line, first person says)

Hey you! (last person)
Hey, what?
(first) Introduce yaslelf
(last) no way
(first) introduce yorself!
(last) I'm (insert name)
(whole line/group) What, what!
(last) I'm (insert name again)
(last person moves to the front of the line and now they are the first)
(first) Hey you! ect.

go through until everyone has introduced theirselfs, doesnt work well with like cheers or soemthing but at like assembalies or council presentations or whatever !
-me! ; 3/19/2007

****
INTRODUCE YOURSELF (Versions #10)
"Hey girl, hey you, introduce yourself. Introduce yourself."

Then each individual girl says a rhyme about themselves, like,

My name is Joan
(group says "check")
I'm from AC
("check")
I come to say
("check")
Don't mess with me
("Check it out")
-Joan C.; from Atlantic City, New Jersey, from remembrances of the late 1970s; Black, Latino, and White girls at Catholic High School; electronic message to Azizi Powell; 2/11/2007

Editor:
For the record, I was born & raised in Atlantic City, New Jersey. However, I don't recall any chant or rhyme like this. I "met" Joan from the online discussion forum called "Mudcat" Cafe. Given information about when she attended this hight school, I know that she's at least ten years younger than me. I very much appreciate her sharing with me this example from the late 1970s. Also, for the record, Joan's rembrances of this year from tthe late 1970s makes this one of the earliest example of a foot stomping cheer that I've directly collected thus far. Thank you , Joan!

****
ROLL CALL (Version #9 of Introduce Yourself)
All: Chick – boom Ah Ah chick a boom roll call
First Person: Hey Sonji
Second Person: Yeah baby
First Person: Hey sonjie
Second Person: Yeah baby
First Person: Introduce your self
Second Person: Right on
First Person: Introduce your self
Second Person: Right on my name is sonji
First Person: Check
Second Person: I like to sing
First Person: Check
Second Person: And when I sing
First Person: Check
Second Person: I do my thing
All: OOOOHHHH roll call Chick a boom, ah ah chick a boom roll call

Each person is “called” one at a time. They make up a rhyme about what they like and the cheer repeats itself
-Sonjala A.(African American female, memories of the late 70’s – early 80’s Elkhart Indiana) ; 3/15/2008

****
SHABOOGIE (Version #12 of Introduce Yourself)
Hey (insert name)
(Yeah?)
Introduce yourself
(No way)
Introduce yourself
(Okay, my name is ______)
Yeah?
(And I´m a Wildcat)
Yeah?
(And when I boogie,)
Yeah?
(I boogie on down)
He boogies on down

Ah, shaboogie,
Ah, ah, shaboogie,
Ah, shaboogie,
Ah, ah, shaboogie
- http://campwildcat.org/pages/custompage.asp?id=47 [retrieved February 10, 2011]

Editor:
This version is listed as a camp song. The probable direct source is the "Bring It On" cheerleader movie. I doubt very much if the Wildcat staff or campers know that this camp song originated as an African American foot stomping cheer. However, it's interesting to see that this cheer is now sometimes performed as a camp song.

****
IT'S THE DIGGY DIGGY DIGGY DONK SHA
it's the diggy diggy diggy donk sha
solo:my name is lisa
group:what
solo:im on the mic yea
group:what
solo:and i came to do my that(or you can say : and i came to rock ya world,)
group:go girl
solo:im a educator plus a man taker(or you can say money maker)
group:what
solo: step up get whopped by a 5th grade(or whatever your grade is)
group:go girl!! it the diggy digyy diggy donk sha

repeat with new person
-arlisa c; 11/12/2009

****
IT ALL STARTED
it all started out at the football game (or basket ball)
when the coach shouted out lisa do yo thang
she said a ooo-sha-wa go kim (girl dances)(rep 2)
then next girl
-arlisa c; 11/12/2009

****
I TT I TI TI
I live in fayettville,nc i am 9 my cuzin taught me this I TT

I TI TI Break it down
I TT I TI TI Break it down
My name is Euraja and I'm the ist Cheerleader
And when I break it down
I break it I break it to the ground
And when I get up
I don't get stuck
And there aint nothing to it
yall can't do it.
-aja; 10/4/2008

****
JAY JAY KUKALAY (Version #1)
Soloist #1 Jay Jay Kukalay
Group Jay Jay Kukalay
Soloist #1 Salesah lahndah
Group Salesah lahndah
Soloist #1 Step back, Shalanda (or back, back Shalonda)
Group Step back, Shalanda
Soloist #1 Oosh, my lover boy!
Group Oosh, my lover boy!
Soloist #1 I’m callin on,
I’m callin on
I’m callin on Rhonda!

[Immediately repeat the cheer from the beginning with a new soloist. Substitute the name or nickname of that soloist in the line "I'm callin on ____". Continue until every member of the group has had one turn as the soloist].
--African American girls, ages around 6-12 years (Lillian Taylor Summer Camp, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1987) audio recorded by Tazi Powell, transcribed by Azizi Powell 1999

Editor:
"Jay Jay Kukalay" is a great example of a foot stomping cheer whose source is a children's folk song. Actually, "Jay Jay Kukalay" and another very closely related cheer "J J Cool Aid" that is given below are the only foot stomping cheers that I know of which have their source in an African children's song. The song that I'm referring to is the Ghanaian "Kye Kye Kule". "Che Che Cole" is the title usually given for Afro-Caribbean dance music versions of this same Ghanaian children song. "Che Che Cole" is pronounced in English "Shay Shay Koolay". Visit http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-rhymes-cheers to find text versions, comments, and videos of the children's game song version of this song.

By reading those examples, you can see the probable origin of the "Soleez sa lahngah" phrase that is found in the foot stomping cheer that is posted above. I also strongly believe that the word "Sholanda" in the phrase "Step back, Sholanda" is a folk etymology version of another phrase that is found in the Akan (Ghanaian) children's song. In the context of the foot stomping cheer, "Sholanda" is used as a female name. A number of contemporary African American female names have the "Sh" beginning and "anda " or "onda" ending.

Unfortunately, few Pittsburghers I have met appear to remember this foot stomping cheer, and I've not found any other documentation of this cheer other than the summer camp that I've already cited. If you know this cheer, please send in example & comments to cocojams17@yahoo.com

Also, click http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=108069&messages=63 to read (and/or add comments to) a Mudcat Cafe discussion thread that I started on the salso (Afro-Caribbean dance) records and the children's song versions of "Kye Kye Kule" ("Che Che Cole".

****
J. J COOL AID (Version #2 of "Jay Jay Kukalay")
Soloist #1 J.J. Cool Aid
Group J.J. Cool Aid
Soloist #1 Teresa Londa *
Group Teresa Londa
Soloist #1 Back, back Tuanda
Whose my lover boy?
I said mmm my sweetie cakes
I’m callin on
I’m callin on
I’m callin on
Shakera
- Anonymous White female living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania who indicated that she grew up in predominately Black neighborhood of Washington, DC; performed this in the 1980s; .; Collected by Azizi Powell, 1999 (Game song/Cheer survey of co-workers, Family Health Council, Pittsburgh, PA.)

****
JUMP IN JUMP OUT (Version #1)
All: Jump in, Jump out.
And turn yourself about.
Jump in, Jump out.
And turn yourself about.
Soloist #1: My name is Kadiyah.
Group: Yeah.
Soloist #1: I like to dance, dance.
I want to be a dancer
all the rest of my life.
Group: All the rest of her life.
All: Jump in, Jump out.
And turn yourself about.
Jump in, Jump out.
And turn yourself about.
Soloist #1: My name is Ebony.
Group: Yeah.
Soloist #1: I like to cheer, cheer.
I want to be a
cheerleader all the rest of my life.
Group: All the rest of her life.

Repeat cheer from the beginning with the next soloist and continue until every member of the group has had one turn as soloist.
-T.M.P.; (African American female}, memories of early/middle 1980’s Pittsburgh, PA)

Editor:
I transcribed this cheer from an audio tape of my daughter performing it in 1995. Here are the movements that I recall her and her friends doing and that she taught me to do:
1. Jump forward one time on the beat while saying the words "jump in".
2. Jump backwards on the words "jump out".
3. Turn around on the words "turn yourself about".
4. Do the standard foot stomping cheer routine for all the other words: To the beat, stomp your right foot and then clap your hands. Then stomp your left foot and then clap your hands. The standard beat pattern is stompstomp clap stompstomp clap.

-snip-

Editor:
Ideally, for this particular cheer, the soloist is supposed to select a verb/noun combination that hasn't been given yet-such as act/actress or teach/teacher. But I recall that a number of girls (particularly the younger girls in the group) will say "Dance/dancer" or "Sing/singer". "Jump In Jump Out" is another example of an Introduction style foot stomping cheer.

****
JUMP IN JUMP OUT (Version #2)
[The blogger wrote that she learned this from her daughter]

...She taught me a new one (new to me at least) - not really a clapping game, but this thread reminded me of it...The kids play this and insert their names and a little something about themselves...

Everyone:
Jump in (clap clap)
Jump out (clap clap)
In-troduce yourself (clap clap)
(clapping continues)
Person who jumped in and out:
My name is Stephanie (yeah)
And I'm a drama queen (uh-huh)
I like to sing (yeah)
And I like chocolate cake (uh-huh, uh-huh, uh-huh).

It can get pretty amusing to see what the kids have to say about themselves.
-Frozen Chosen, http://msgboard.snopes.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=95;t=0... , February 13, 2003
-snip-
Read my previous comment about the referent "drama queen".

****
JUMP IN JUMP OUT (Version #3)
I remember this from a show i watched:
jump in jump out
turn yourself around.
jump in jump out
introduce yourself
my name is keisysha.
what.
i'm nine
huh.
and i'm so fine everyday of my life.
everyday of her life.

and you go on until everyone gets a turn. and don't forget to rhyme. have fun. but i wish i new more but i'm only 12. bye and keep sending chants.
-db, 3/08/2006

****
JUMP IN JUMP OUT (Version #4)
Jump in jump out
introduce yo self (2x)
my name is Shakyra
(yea)
i go to school (yea)
im not the teacher
(yea)
i kno the rules
(yea kno them rules)

keep on doing it to everybody had a turn
-Shakyra P; 5/8/2007

****
JUMP IN JUMP OUT (Version #5)
ALL: jump in jump out
turn yo self around
jump in jump out
introduce yo self.....
1 PERSON: my name (insert girls name)
ALL: yeah
1 PERSON: i like to (say what u like to do)
ALL: yeah
1 PERSON: and im gone (what ever you like to do)
ALL: yeah
1 PERSON: for the rest of my life
ALL: for the rest of her life
(go again with a different person)
-Shay; 5/14/2007

Editor:
See examples of "Introduce Yourself" on this page for very similar rhymes.

"I'm gone" in this example probably means "I'm gonna" (for example "I'm gonna be a dancer")

****
JUMP IN THE CAR
I was reading some of these examples and I remember doing alot of them being that im only 17...so0o heres one that i remember playing around 95'-96'...

Jump in car (clap 3X)
Step on the gas {3x}
Move to the side,
and let (name) pass
Eh-Hey,
Ooh-Ahh Lookin at Lady,
Ooh-Ahh Aint she fine,
Ooh-Ahh Betta not touch her,
ooh-ahh Cuz she'll blow your mind!
Turn around (clap 3X)
Touch the ground {clap 3x}
I said a get a get a get a get on down
Say what!?!
get a get a get a get on down

Setup of the game: the kids who are playing have to stand in two lines like soul train... when they say "jump in the car" everyone jumps once then claps..."step on the gas" everone stretches out their right foot and stomps it down...."move to the side"...everyone moves back...and let (NAME) pass" the first person in the line goes down the middle and does a dance while the other kids say "ooh ah lookin at lady, ooh ahh aint she fine, ooh ahh betta not touch her, ooh ahh cuz she'll blow your mind. ...when they say "turn around" the girl in the line turns..."touch the ground" the same girl touches the ground...then " i said a get a get a get a get on down" the girl has to get down as low as she can...when the person in the middle is done, the next person goes.
-MeLLi ; 5/12/2007

****
LA CHU CHU
la chu chu
la chu chu
la chu chu
bang bang!!

~repeat~

now watch me
now watch me
now watch me do my thang

I said-a popcorn,
cherry pop
ladi dadi shake my body
tutti fruity shake my booty

we're going down
down to the ground
we're commin up
like hot stuff

don't push me down
down to the ground
we're commin up
to kick some butt
-Kanna H.
-snip-
This was sent to me in paragraph form. I reformatted it to enhance its readability.

****
LET ME TELL YOU
GROUP: 5,6,7,8!!!!
Well, Let me tell you!!!! About This Girl!!!!
Her name Is {your name here} Taquina!!!!
TAQUINA: Well, My name is Taquina
and I'm da bomb!!!!
GROUP: Ooh!!!! She think she bad!!!!
TAQUINA: I know I'm rad!!!!
GROUP: Ooh!!!! She think she cook!!!!
TAQUINA: Watch me while I pop my collar!!!!
-courtney; 5/21/2007

Editor:
"Rad" is American [not African American] slang for "very good" .That slang term probable comes from the word "radical". However, in the response "I know I'm rad" , the word "rad" could be a typo for "bad". The word "cook" in the sentence "She think she cook" might be a typo for "cool". My guess is that "watch me while I pop my collar" means that the girl is loosening up her clothes to get ready to fight.

****
LONDON BRIDGES
how come everytime (your name) come around
my londay londay londay bridge wanna go down
like london london london wanna go down
like london we going down like (then the next person in line goes)
-Breana; 12/22/2006

****
L-O-V-E (Version #1)
All: L-O-V-E. L-O-V-E. L-O-V. L-O-V.
L-O-V-E.
Soloist #1: Well, Kayla’s my name.
And love is my game.
I got this boy on my mind.
And Lord knows he’s fine.
He calls me his girl,
His number 1 girl.
I don’t know his sign
But Taurus is mine.
All: L-O-V-E. L-O-V-E. L-O-V. L-O-V.
L-O-V-E.
Soloist #2 : Well Tamika's my name.
And love is my game.
I got this boy on my mind.
And Lord knows he’s fine.
I got his name on my shirt.
And don't call it dirt.
All: L-O-V-E. L-O-V-E. L-O-V. L-O-V.
L-O-V-E
Soloist #3 :Sadika's my name.
And love is my game
I got this boy on my mind
and he sure is fine.
Blue is my color
Don't you worry 'bout my lover.
All: L-O-V-E. L-O-V-E. L-O-V. L-O-V.
L-O-V-E

(Return to beginning and repeat with a new soloist. That soloist repeats the same verse or a rhyming verse in the same pattern. This continues until everyone in the group has had one turn as soloist with this cheer)
-Tazi.M.Powell ; remembrance of Pittsburgh, PA. in the mid 1980s; Collected by Azizi Powell, 2/1996

Editor:
Notice the similarities between this foot stomping cheer and "Football" version #1 in
Cocojams' Cheerleader Cheers page.

Here is a video from Sesame Street in which girls use a very similar lyrical structure as "Love". The performance activity for this cheer is also very similar if not the same movements that I observed for this cheer (in Pittsburgh, PA, in the 1980s and in the 1990s)

Sesame Street - Girls clap out a song about K

Posted by wattamack4
July 11, 2007

-snip-
In this creative video, the girls are doing a foot stomping cheer routine to the tune of a cheer that was called L O V E. The side foot stomps & back & forth step combined with individual hand claps movements are very much like that cheer. I saw girls perform in Pittsburgh in the late 1980s. But it was performed in a semi circle & not lines.

It wasn't until the mid 2000s that I noticed that girls stood in front of the line when it was their turn to be the soloist (and then moved back to a place in the line when her soloist turn ends. Notice the continual percussive foot stomping and handclapping movements that accompany this chant.

It's clear that this educational television show changed the words of this cheer in order to focus on "K". However, the cheer retains the standard lyrical structural pattern of foot stomping cheers in that the cheer begins the group voice, the cheer is made up of two line rhymes. iBut for the purpose of the television segment, instead of the cheer starting again from the beginning with a new soloist, the group chants/sings another verse that is led by the same soloist. Another difference from the "real" performances that I have observed, in the second verse one girl from the group says a line while the other members of the group are silent. And, of course, the ending of this cheer is different from how the "real" cheer ends.

Here's my transcription of this cheer:

Group (including the soloist) kah kah kah k
kah kah kah k
kankahkah kahkah kah kah
kah kah kah k

(repeat one time)

Sololist: Well my name is Kiona
My letter is K
K like a kite and you blow me away
K turns the key
K's a kick from me

Group (including the soloist) kah kah kah k
kah kah kah k
kankahkah kahkah kah kah
kah kah kah k

(repeat one time)

Group (including the soloist*) Well her name is Kiona
and her letter is k
One girl: K like a kangaroo
hoppin all day
Group: K's a king
ah Kiss
K is like this:
K!

* The soloist chants "My name is Kiona" ["Kiona" is usually pronounced key-OH-nah].

Also notice that I wrote "ka" as "kah" for the purpose of this transcription because "ah" is the usual African American pronunciation for the word "a" and sounds such as "ka".

****
L-O-V-E (Version #2)
I am a 25 year old African American woman from Eastern North Carolina. The section on the chant L-O-V-E caught my attention we used to do this when I was younger. We would stand in a circle and we would clap our hands and stomp our feet sort of tapping out the words

Group: L-O-V-E, L-O-V-E, L-O-V, L-O-V, L-O-V-E
First Person: Erica's my name
love is my game
I got this boy on my mind
he's looking real fine
he calls me his girl
his number one pearl

Then you move on to the next person and they repeat the same thing only with their name in place.
-Erica; 1/3/2008

Editor:
Thanks Erica for sharing information about where and how you performed this cheer. FWIW, I've never seen these cheers done in a circle formation. I've only seen them chanted by girls in either semi-circles, horizontal lines, or vertical lines. And it's only recently (about two years or so ago), that I've noticed the soloist moving up front of the line or the semi-circle when it's her soloist turn. But, I've only seen these cheers done in Pittsburgh, PA area, so it's interesting to learn how some of them are done in other places.

M, N
MOVE GIRL
You betta move
girl you betta move.
[say both lines(3x)]
Now drop it low
Drop it low.
Drop it low
Drop it low

[return to the beginning with the next girl in the center.]

-http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0jNwYcqET0&feature=related; transcription from video on 1/14/2012

* Thanks to tknight51, lauren patton, and PrincessAmandaTVfor adding comments to this video's comment thread which indicated that the girls were saying "drop it low". I appreciate it as I wasn't sure about what the girls said at the end of this cheer.

Here's that video:

Shaw Cheerleaders "Move Girl"

Uploaded by MrDamn09 on Jan 9, 2011

Shaw High School Cheerleaders Before the game hype

Editor:

This example demonstrates how foot stomping cheers may have evolved from ring (circle) games with one person in the middle.

This circle game is performed in the group/consecutive soloist pattern of foot stomping cheers. The hand clapping foot stomping motions are also those of foot stomping cheers. The only difference is that the soloist doesn't have any solo actions but instead does a solo dance.

****
MY NAME IS ___ (Example #1)
I made this cheer up.
My name is Alayah.
(somebody else says) Yeah.
And when they see me.
It's like an earthquake!
-Alayah, age 6 years (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania); 9/7/2006

Editor:
I observed Alayah doing this cheer and several other cheerleader cheers. Alayah did a foot stomping step routine for most of this cheer. On the word "earthquake" she sashayed down, close to the floor.

Note how the some of these cheers are similar or the same as the cheers that were used in the Bring It On cheerleader movies. Those movies have had a tremendous influence on contemporary playground cheers & rhymes.

****
MY NAME IS ___ (Example #2)
cheer cheer
my name is Allie
what?
my name is Allie
and I'm from the valley
and we're gonna kick you butta.
-Allie; 9/17/2006

****
MY NAME IS ___ (Example #3)
SOLO:My name is Naomi on the Phone
with my Daisy Dukes on
if you see me on the street
boy you better speak to me.
GROUP:Oo she think she bad
SOLO: At least i use a wash rag
GROUP: Oo she think she cool
SOLO: Soap and water will do
GROUP:Oo she think she fine
SOLO: Fine Fine #9
take yo man anytime,
he took me out he brought me back
he besta have my cadillac.
he brought you 1
he brought me 2,
married me and divorced you.
he taught me Karate
and taught me Kung Fu.
mess wit me
and i'll do it on you
GROUP:Bang Bang choo choo train
wind her up she'll do her thang
SOLO: I can't
GROUP:Why not
SOLO: I said i can't
GROUP:WHY NOT?
SOLO: I said my back is aching
and my bra's too tight.
My booty's shakin from the left to the right
GROUP:Left Right
Left Right
yo mama is a ugly sight
-Naomi; 1/17/2007

****
MY NAME IS ____ (Example #4)
heres a cheer i saw from a movie but i mixed up some of the words
"ready my name is Autumn
[yeah]
so pretty so strong
[yeah]
and when i shake it
[yeah]
you better bring it on
go devils
go go go devils
break it down now.
-Autumn; 2/18/2007

Editor:
Given the words to this cheer, the movie that Autumn saw was probably Bring It On-All Or Nothing. Also, I think that "ready my name is" is probably a folk etymology version of "Really my name is" (which isn't a cheer found in the Bring It On movies). Examples of "Really" are found below.

****
MY NAME IS ___ (Example #5)
my name is ___
i like to cheer,
yeah.
when i go up
you go down.
now all is done
just turn around!
-emily; 8/22/2008

****
MY NAME IS ____ (Example #6)
I learned this from my girl sara

My name is (enter your name)
and as u can see
i the finest chick
in albany
im rough and though
cant touch my stuff
im fly like a butterflie
i sting like a bee
thats why all the boys tell me
break it down shawty
-Samantha; 11/25/2008

Editor:
It’s interesting to see how former heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali’s “float like a butterfly/sting like a bee” has been picked up by children and included in cheers such as this one.

I think that "though" is probably a typo of the word "tough". "Shawty" ="shorty" .In this context, "shawty" is a mildly affectionate term similar to "young lady").

****
NO DOUBT
Soloist: My name is (name)
And theres no doubt
Group: No Doubt
Soloist: Im the (adj) cheerleader
in the south
And I can really really
really really really
Turn it out
Group: Go (name)
Go (name)
Go (Name)

This is said while soloist is doing his/her jumps
-Breanne; 11/7/2006

O,P
ON THE LIST
All: On the List
On, on the list
(I saidah)* On the list
On, on the list
Soloist #1: (Well)* Kayla''s my name **
and I’m first on the list
and I got a little story
that goes like this
One person from the group: Kick it!***
All: Put your hand up in the air
like ah Coca Cola ****
and ah ROOT BEER
Kick off your shoes
and relax your feet
and move your body
to Kayla's***** beat [stomp stomp clap hit hit hit hit clap clap]
-TMP (African American female, memory of cheers in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the mid 1980s; demonstrated for her mother Azizi Powell in 1996

* optional
** Say your name or nickname. You could say it that way or "Kayla is my name". or "My name is Kayla" or "My name's".

*** "Kick it!" means something like "Do that dance real good!" Usually when we were beginning a cheer, we would do the step without chanting until we were sure that everyone was on beat, and someone "the leader" would say "Kick that beat!". That meant that we were about to really start the cheer.

**** Some people likes Pepsi Cola better than Coca Cola. So we would agree to say that for the while cheer instead of saying Coca Cola. But we would always say Root Beer.

***** Sometimes the group would say the name of the soloist and she would say "to my beat". Other times the soloist would also just say her name along with everyone else.

[Hit” means to slap your thighs. On the first hit you to the right side; the next time you get to hit you turn to the back. The next time to the right, and the last time you end up in the front; you’ve made a box shape and then it’s the next girl’s turn]
The soloist performs this routine and then the entire group does the same step routine that she did, along with her.]

(Return to beginning with soloist #2 who says her name and says she's second on the list. The same pattern continues until every member of the group has has one turn as the soloist).

Here's the beat routine:

stomp clap stomp stomp clap
You start with your right foot (stomp) and then you do two stomps on your left foot then start all over again. You basically stay in place, It's not jumping but steppin.

This is the way most foot stomping cheers are done.

****
PLAYGROUND
All: I’ve fallin. I can‘t get up.
I’ve fallin. I can‘t get up.
Smack, Jack! Homie don’t play that.
Kick off your shoes (or "Put up your dukes")
And let’s get loose!
All except the soloist: Kick it "T", Kick it T! Kick it T!
Bust it "T", Bust it "T", Bust it!
Swing it "T", Swing it "T", Swing it!
Soloist: I swing my beat at the playground!

-African American girls ages 7-12 years old; Lillian Taylor Camp; Pittsburgh, PA, 1992 or 1993; collected by Tazi M. Powell

(Repeat the entire rhyme with next soloist, andcontinue repeating in this manner until
every one in the group has had one turn as the soloist).

*The group used the first initial of the soloist’s name or nickname

Editor
“Playground” is a dance style foot stomping cheer that demonstrates the creative way that children’s folk rhymes and cheers are created from a number of different mass media sources. The cheer’s title and the lines that begin with “Kick off your shoes and let’s get loose” are lifted from the 1991 hit R&B song “Playground” by ABC (Another Bad Creation), a group of young African American teenage boys.

The lines “I’ve fallin’ and I can’t get up” are from a low budget television commercial for security telephone equipment for the elderly. That commercial featured an elderly woman falling down and then saying those exact words. In a weird way, that commercial struck some people’s funny bone.

"Homey don’t play that” was the signature lines of “Homie D. Clown”, a character created by comedian Damon Wayans on the innovative comedy television show "In Living Color".
The name "Homey" is derived from the 1990s referent "home boy" (a male from your neighborhood or your city). The character Homie worked as a clown as part of his prison work release program. But Homie had no aptitude for leading children’s party activities and no patience with the little children’s constant questions. At regular intervals in the party, when children asked Homey questions, he would smack them with a rag like item that he held. The phrase "smack Jack" is an internal rhyme which alludes to this habit.

Homie would also refuse to perform expected “clown” activities at those children's paries. For instance, if a child asked him to make shapes out of balloons, Homey would smack him or her with his baseball bat and say “Homie don’t play that”. "Homey don't play that" became an African American vernacular. That line means that it's unthinkable for you to do what you've been asked to do (it's against your essential nature).

While there are video clips of Homey The Clown from the "In Living Color" program, I consider those clips to be problematic because of their violence, inclusion of some mild profanity, and inclusion of bigoted comments i.e - Homey is pro-Black and is antagonistic to the White establishment.

In the context of this foot stomping cheer, “Bust it!”, "Swing it!”, and “Kick it!” all mean “Show us how well you dance.”

"She kicked her beat" means that the girl danced really well.

Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eq_-DZBZOWc&ob=av2e for the music video that inspired this foot stomping cheer: Another Bad Creation's (ABC) -" Playground" (1991)

Also see http://www.lyricsdownload.com/another-bad-creation-playground-lyrics.html and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Another_Bad_Creation for this song's lyrics and for information about this song.

****
POPCORN ON A TRAIN (Version #1)
popcoooorn on a train
and lee-et *name* do her/his thang
she said a oomp dad*day* oomp da*day*
oomp da*day* oomp da*day*

....repeat til every1 goes
-Guest,17yr old kid at heart:) ; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4300&messages=168 ; Children's Street Songs ; July 10, 2010

****
POPCORN ON A TRAIN (Version #1)
Popcorn on a train
So watch [girl's name] do her thing
She goes boom click click click *
boom clickclick click
Popcorn on a train.

* I'm unsure about the "click click click words. At first I thought they were saying "boom beep beep beep".

The girl whose name is mentioned does some acrobatic movment like a split.

After each girl does their selected movement, the entire group chants:

Popcorn on a train
So watch [group's name] do our thing
We go boom click click click
boom clickclick click
Popcorn on a train.
- Uploaded by AshalettaJ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DmPUhm9phPM&feature=related . May 14, 2011 (transcription from watching the video)

Here's that video:

Uploaded by AshalettaJ on May 14, 2011

The pinks

-snip-
Notice that there the routine doesn't include any foot stomps (steppin). However, the structure of the cheer is still that of a foot stomping cheer.

***
Cheers page.

Q,R,
CALL REPUTATION (Version #1 of Razzle Dazzle)
this is a saying call reputation

my name is yonnqa
i'm number one
my reputation has just begun
so if you see me
step a side
cause i don't take no jive
oh think she cool
correction baby
i no i'm cool
i no karate
i no kunfu
you miss with me
i co it on you
rasasol o dazzo o ox2
-yaya ; 2/23/2007

Editor:
"ox2" probably means "repeat two times.

****
RAZZLE DAZZLE (Version #2)
Hiya great site! Here is a cheer: (Where it says Emily change it to your name)

Razzle Dazzle(clap clap clap)
Razzle Dazzle(clap clap clap)
My name is Emily
I'm number one
My Razzle Dazzle has just begun
So when you see me step aside.
You know Emily Don't take no Jive
(Everybody) OOh She thinks she's bad
(person speaking previously) No, baby I know I'm bad.
-Emiii; 5/21/2007

****
RAZZLE DAZZLE (Version #3)
Razzle Dazzle (all the girls are in a circle, one girl goes in the middle to sing)
my name is ____
i'm number 1,
my razzle dazzle has just begun
so if you see me better step aside
cause this bad girl don't take no jive
(everybody else in the cirle:)
ooh. she thinks she's bad correction baby,
i KNOW i'm bad ooh.
she thinks she's fine
fine enough to blow
YOUR mind razzle dazzle
uh huh uh huh
razzle dazzle uh huh.
WOO WOO razzle dazzle uh huh
uh huh razzle dazzle uh huh.
WOO WOO (repeat with everybody in the circle)
-liz ; 6/22/2007

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-cheerleader-cheers to find additional examples of this cheer.

****
REALLY (Version #1)
All: Really ah hah!
Really ah hah!
Soloist #1: Really my name is Lisa.
Really my sign is Aries.
Group except for soloist: Say what?
Soloist #1: Ah Aries.
Group: Say what?
Soloist #1: Cause I’m F-I-N-E fine.
Like a D-I-M-E. dime.
Don’t waste my T-I-M-E. time.
I'll blow your M-I-N-D mind.
Cause I’m a pro.
Group: Say what?
Soloist #1: A P-R-O.
Group: Say what?
Soloist #1: Cause I’m a triple P.
Triple R.
Triple O.
Sexy pro.
-African American girls ages 7-12 years attending Lillian Taylor summer camp, Pittsburgh, PA 1991-1992, collected by T.M.P., camp counselor/ cheer coach, 1992

Repeat entire cheer from the beginning with the next soloist. That soloist says her name or nickname, and gives her astrological sign. Continue in this pattern until every member of the informal group has had one turn as the soloist)

****
REALLY (Version #2)
Really uh huh really uh huh
really my name is (say your name)
really my sign is (say your sign)
say what
a (say your sign)
say what
cause Im f i n e fine
like an d i m e dime
dont waste my t i me time
Ill blow your m i n d mind
-Deajaih; Pittsburgh, PA, 2/21/06

****
ROCK THE BOAT
Editor: I'm including each example of this cheer in the same category, regardless of its title.

ROCK THE BOAT (Version #1)
Hey all! Did anyone do cheers? Me and my girls used to "battle" other groups of girls from different neighborhoods. My favorite:

Rock the boat
rock, rock the boat
Rock the boat
rock rock the boat
My name is Mocha
(chorus sings) Rock the boat
I'm feeling fine
(chorus) Rock the boat
Just like my sign
(chorus) rock the boat
My sign is GEMINI
I say bang, bang choo-choo train
wind me up and I do my thang
Reeses Pieces, Butter cup
you mess with me
and I'll [expletive deleted] you up

If my momma EVER knew I was cursing like that!!
Sexy Mocha; (African American woman, Brooklyn, New York); http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=5627, “remember when”; 07-31-2000

Editor:
That deleted curse word in that example was completely spelled out with asterisks and other punctuation marks.

****
ROCK THE BOAT (Version #2)
Rock the boat,
Rock, rock the boat
repeat
My name is Yasmin
(rock the boat)
I know I'm fine
(rock the boat)
Just like my sign
(rock the boat)
My sign is Leo
I go bang-bang choo choo train
Wind me up and I do my thing
Reeses pieces butter cup
Don't mess with me,
cause I'll mess you up,
Rock the boat,
rock rock the boat...
-Yasmin H., (Latina; memories of East New York, New York in the late 1980s) sent to Cocojams by email on 2/ 25/2004

Editor:
The words in parenthesis were chanted by the other members of the cheerleading squad. The "rock the boat" refrain probably come from the The Hues Corporation's 1974 R&B hit song with that title. Click
http://ntl.matrix.com.br/pfilho/html/lyrics/r/rock_the_boat.txt for the lyrics to that song.

The "reeses pieces butter cup/mess with me I'll mess you up" line is also found in the widely known "Brick Wall Water Fall" handclap rhyme/cheerleader cheer.

****
ROCK THE BOAT (Version #3)
We are the {school's mascot} rock the boat!
We're feelin fine
rock the boat!
Mess with us
rock the boat!
We'll blow your mind
rock the boat!
I said a bing-bang choo-choo train
come on {school's mascot}
lets do our thang.
our reeces peices
our buttercup
all you gotta do is warm us up!
we know karate
we know cungfu..
mess with us
and we'll use it on you!
-Kelley; 12/10/2006

****
ROCK MY BOAT (Version #4)
heres a cheer i learned last year

hey rock my boat
no way no way
rock my boat ok ok
she slides she glides
she on that donkey ride
she wants u and u
to rock her boat too
-jessica ; 2/20/2007

Editor:
This example could have also been included on Cocojams' Cheerleading Cheers page.

****
ROCK DAT BOAT (Version #5)
my names (girls name)
(group says) rock da boat
(person says) i am feeling fine
(groups says) rock da boat
(person says) you mess with me
(group says)rock da boat
(person says) i`ll blow you mind
(group says) rock da boat
-Olivia ; 3/10/2008

****
ROCK THE BOAT (Version #6)
Well, If you know the ryhme "Rock the Boat", from Girl Scouts, it's easy to remember Jig-a-low, at the school I attend.

Girl 1-My Name is (Your Name)
Group- ROCK THE BOAT!
Girl 2-I'm feelin' fine!
Group-ROCK THE BOAT
Girl 1-I'll blow your mind!
Group-ROCK THE BOAT!
Girl 1-Hit it.
All- Bang, Bang, Choo-Choo Train,
blow me up and I'll do me thang,
Reece's Pieces; 7-Up,
You mess with me I mess you up!
I know Karate I know Kung-Fu!
Be my friend, I'll teach you to,
ROCK THE BOAT!!
ROCK-ROCK THE BOAT!

Yes, kind of awkward when you see a group of Junior Girl Scouts singing, "You mess with me I mess you up!"
I think it increases sales, though!!
-Guest, School Rhyme Master http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100807&messages=45 Gigalo & other children's rhymes &cheers l May 16 , 2010

Editor:
The comment about "increasing sales" probably is a witty reference to the sale of girl scout cookies. This contributor's version of "Jigalow" is found above.

****
ROLL CALL
I learned this from Bring It On (awesome movie RECOMENED!)

Roll Call!
My name is (your name)
(i am rough and tough,etc.)
yeh ( and when i shake it Etc.)
yeah
(The boys go I Mommy etc.)
Whoo Roll call
(ext person in line does the same thing until every one is done
Every body all together -
we are the (your team name)
And we are tough
And when once we've won
we've kicked some but. Goooo (your team's name)

I love your site it is one of my resources to get some new awesome cheers from all the great captains or not. Luv ya
-K-del ; 6/11/2007

Editor:
The Bring It On series of cheerleader movies have greatly influenced contemporary children's cheers. People who haven't seen these movies should try to see them (in my opinion, and the opinion of several movie reviewers, the 1st and the 3rd movies in the series are the best ones).

K-del, thanks for your compliment about this Cocojams. I'm happy that the cheers posted on Cocojams are actually being used. It's interesting to read different versions of cheers & rhymes that are done throughout the USA and throughout other places in the world. I hope that people will keep on sending in examples so Cocojams will continue to be the number one resource for children's cheers & rhymes.

See the entries for "Shabooya Roll Call" below for more comments and examples of that cheer.

S,T
SHABOOYA ROLL CALL
Editor:
"Shabooya Roll Call" is a cheer which is best known because it was featured in the 2006 Bring It On. All Or Nothing cheerleader movie. This was the third movie in the Bring It On cheerleader movie series.

But that movie's writers didn't come up with the idea for that cheer's title, or its "shabooya sha sha shabooya rol" chorus, or its call & response pattern with consecutive soloists. A version of the Shabooya Roll Call cheer is included in Spike Lee's 1996 movie Get On The Bus. It's likely that Spike Lee got that cheer from African American spoken word traditions, although I'm not certiain if that cheer originated with adults (as it was portrayed in that movie) or with children/youth. Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTjJJiu2lC0 for the movie clip of Shabooya Roll Call in Get On The Bus. The uploader of that video describes "Shabooya Roll Call" as a "rap.. with a catchy chorus".

Here are the words of that "rap" from that movie scene:

GET ON THE BUS SHABOOYA ROLL CALL
Shabooya sha sha shabooya roll call
Shabooya sha sha shabooya roll call
-repeat multiple times-
My name is Mike
Yeah
Representing New York
Yeah
I’m not a Muslim
Yeah
Still don’t eat pork
Roll Call
Shabooya sha sha shabooya roll call
Shabooya sha sha shabooya roll call
Don’t call me Evan
yeah
Cause I’m on the move
Yeah
Don’t call me junior
Yeah
But you can call me Smooth
Roll Call
Shabooya sha sha shabooya roll call
Shabooya sha sha shabooya roll call
Hey My name is Evan
Yeah
Evan senior
They got my son
yeah
On a misdemeanor
Roll Call
Shabooya sha sha shabooya roll call
Shabooya sha sha shabooya roll call
My name is Gary
Yeah
I’m down with Shelly
Yeah
She’s got the butta
Yeah
I got the jelly.
Roll Call
Shabooya sha sha shabooya roll call
Shabooya sha sha shabooya roll call
My name is X
And I’m a Bruin
And I blah blah blah
[laughter because he messed up]
My name Jamal
Yeah
My mind is free
yeah
We need more love
Yeah
And unity
Roll Call
Shabooya sha sha shabooya roll call
Shabooya sha sha shabooya roll call
My name is Pop
Yeah
We at the top
Yeah
Now all this Shabooya
Yeah
Has got to stop.

-snip-

Click http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0116404/ for information about the Get On The Bus movie.

Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIzgWIjOtiI&feature=related to find a video of that cheer. Warning -The introduction to that cheer contains a mild curse word. Here's the text of that cheer from http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0490822/quotes Bring It On: All or Nothing (2006)

Camille: Here we go now!
Camille, Kirresha, Leti: [starts dance routine] Sha boo ya sha sha sha boo ya. Roll call. Sha boo ya sha sha sha boo ya. Roll call.
Leti: My name is Leti.
I like to party.
And when I shake it,
the boys say "ay mami!".
Camille, Kirresha, Leti: Sha boo ya sha sha sha boo ya. Roll call.
Camille: My name Camille.
Give you three wishes.
You see me shake it,
'cause I'm delicious.
Camille, Kirresha, Leti: Sha boo ya sha sha sha boo ya. Roll call.
Kirresha: My name Kirresha.
Get out my face.
'Cause when I shake it,
it's like an earthquake.

-snip-

A "roll call" is when the teacher checks who is in attendance by one by one calling out the names of the students on her roll (class roster). When students hear their name, they shout out "Here." or "Present". See the information listed above for "introduction foot stomping cheers.

Here are examples of this cheer that Cocojams visitors sent in (Note that most of these examples are replications of the movie scene given above). I've included them to show how influential that movie has been. In addition, I've included a few videos below of people doing this cheer with the same words or with different words than the movie version. Note that one of the contributors of these examples is from Scotland and another is from Australia. That lends credence to the power of internationally shown movies to influence the recreational chants of young people throughout the world.

Versions of this cheer are posted here regardless of the title or first line given to the example.

SHABOOYA ROLL CALL (Version #1)
Camille: Here we go now!
Camille, Kirresha, Leti: [starts dance routine] Sha boo ya sha sha sha boo ya. Roll call. Sha boo ya sha sha sha boo ya. Roll call.
Leti: My name is Leti.
Group: Yeah
I like to party
Group: Yeah.
And when I shake it,
Group: Yeah
the boys say "ay mami!".
[sometimes given as "Yeah" or "Oh Yeah"']
Camille, Kirresha, Leti: Sha boo ya sha sha sha boo ya. Roll call.
Camille: My name Camille.
Group: Yeah
Give you three wishes.
Group: Yeah
You see me shake it,
Group: Yeah
'cause I'm delicious.
[sometimes given as "Yeah" or "Oh Yeah"']
Camille, Kirresha, Leti: Sha boo ya sha sha sha boo ya. Roll call.
Kirresha: My name Kirresha.
Group: Yeah
Get out my face.
Group: Yeah
'Cause when I shake it,
Group: Yeah
it's like an earthquake.
- lyrics from the movie Bring It On: All or Nothing (2006)

Here's that video. Warning - A mild curse word is said prior to beginning this cheer.

Shabooya: Role Call!

Uploaded by ohsosexy93 on Apr 3, 2009

****
SHABOOYA ROLL CALL (Example #2)
This cheer is the best!!

Shabooya Sha Sha
Shabooya Roll Call
My name is ____ {person's name}
I like to party
so when the boys see me shake it
they say Ay Mammi!!
-Rihana ; 11/22/2006

Editor:
Visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bring_It_On:_All_or_Nothing to learn more about this movie.

I'm interested in finding out if anyone knew a children's rhyme or cheer that uses the word "Shabooya" or a similar sounding word before that movie's release.

Here's a video of girls performing this chant. A foot stomping routine is done only in the beginning of this chant. Note that this routine is much less exaggerated than the routine that was performed in the Bring It On movie.

****
SHABOOYA ROLL CALL (Example #3)
I don't have a comment but here is my Cheer

Sha Booya!
Sha booya sha sha
sha booya roll call
Sha booya sha sha
sha booya roll call
my name is ________ (persons name)
i like to party
so when the boys see me shake it
they say ayi mammi
You use 3 wishes to see me shake it
so when the _____{Crew's name}
shake it its like an earrrrrthquaake!!
-Rihana & Alyssa; 11/26/2006

****
SHAPUYA ROLL CALL (Example #4)
i actually got these from a movie but i reckon they're good

shapuya-sha
sha shapuya- roll call
shapuya-sha sha
shapuya roll call
my name {ur name,
{yeh}
i like to party
{yeh}
but when i shake it
{yeh}
the boys say ai mami!
shapuya-sha sha
shapuya- roll call
my name{ ur name }
{yeh}
grant you 3 wishes
{yeh}
yo see me shake it
{yeh}
coz im delicious!
shapuya-sha sha
shapuya- rol call
my name {ur name }
{Yeh}
get outta my face
{yeh}
coz when i shake it
{yeh}
it's like an earthquake!
-loyola {northern territory aus}; 10/21/2006

****
SHABOOYAH (Example #5)
[We All Call] Shabooyah! Shah! Shah! Shaabooyahh!
[Main Person] Mah name is Kelsey
[All] Yeah
[Main Person] Ah like to party!
[All] Yeah
[Main Person] And when A Shake it
The boys say OOH BOOTY LICIOUS x

And it goes on and on and on with different people being the main characters :D
i got this song off Bring It On All Or Nothing
-K3LS3Y From Scotland; 5/10/2007

****
SHABOO YA (Example #6)
i have a cheer

shaboo ya
yeah yeha
shaboo ya roll call
my name is sam
and i like to jam
when the boys see me
they say hey mama!!!
-samantha; 6/7/2007

****
SHABOO YA (Example #7)
Hi my name is Kaylee i am a real cheerleader for the bulldogs at my school so i hope you like this cheer:.....

sha boo ya sha sha sha boo ya rode call
my name is _________
(yyeeaahh)
i like to party
(yeaahh)
when i shake it
(yeaahh)
the boys say i mammi
sha boo ya sha sha sha boo ya rode call
my name is _________
(yyeeah)
you got 3 wishes
(yeeahh)
when i shake it
(yeaah)
i'm all elicious
sha boo ya sha sha sha boo ya rode call
my name is __________
yeeahh)
get out my face
yeaah)
when i shake
yeeah)
its like a hurricane
sha boo ya sha sha sha boo ya rode call!!! (enjoy with 3 peeps)
-Kaylee; 3/14/2008

Editor:
In the context of this cheer, "peeps" means "people" (friends)

****
SHABOOYA (Example #8)

ShaBooyah

Uploaded by kaitmagkay on Jan 3, 2009

Reika Kayla and Kaity having fun with the family and theres a little interruption by Kristina and Chris laughin

****
SHAKE WHAT I GOT IN MY SKIRT (Version #1)
My name is Makayla
and I'm here today
to shake what I got in my skirt.
I could turn around
and I could hit the ground
and shake what I got in my skirt.
-Makayla, African American female (Fort Pitt Accelerated Learning Academy; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania); 5/9/2008, collected by Azizi Powell, 5/9/2008

Editor:
This is a modified foot stomping cheer. See comments for Version #2 of this cheer.

All of the girls performing this cheer do the foot stomping routine (stompclap stompstompclap. {stomp-right foot; clap-hands; stomp left then right foot; clap hands). One girl at at time says the cheer while she is doing the routine along with the other girls. After that girl says the entire cheer, the cheer starts again and the next girl says the same thing except she says her name or her nickname. This pattern continues until every girl has had one turn as the soloist.

****
SHAKE WHAT I GOT IN MY SKIRT (Version #2)
My name is Raya and I'm here to say
I can shake what I got in my skirt.
I can turn around
And touch the ground
And I can shake what I got in my skirt.
-Raya & Sha'ona, African American females, Fort Pitt Accelerated Learning Academy; Pittsburgh, PA; 6/12/2008; collected by Azizi Powell, 6/12/2008

The cheer begins again with Sha'ona giving her name and saying the same lines except

Editor:
This is a modified foot stomping cheer as it doesn’t start with everyone in the group chanting something in unison. However, this cheer follows the “consecutive soloist” pattern which is a signature characteristic of foot stomping cheers. The consecutive soloist pattern means that each member of the group (or squad) has a turn being the soloist.

****
SOPHISTICATED LADY [Fragment] Version #1
[this part is sung]
Sophisticated lady
Sophisticated Lay Dee
who rocks?
Sophisticated lady
Sophisticated Lay Dee
who rocks?

[this next part is chanted faster than the first part which was sung]
Well my name is (insert name)
and I rock.
I got hips upon me
And I'm cute and fine.
If you mess with me
I'll blow your mind.
I love my man.
If you try to take him
I'll do all I can.
You may rock the ocean
You may rock the sea
But if you rock my man
You'll be rockin with me.
You may kiss your mother.
You may kiss your father.
But if you kiss my man
You will kiss no other.

Group-Sophisticated lady
Sophisticated Lay Dee
Sophisticated lady
who rocks
Sophisticated Lay Dee
Sophisticated lady
who rocks
- Tazi M. Powell, (African American female, memories of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the early to mid 1980s or late); transcribed by Azizi Powell, 1997

Editor:
I'm posting this from my notes. Interesting enough, my daughter says she only has a vague memory of this cheer, unlike her clear memories of a number of other foot stomping cheers.

These soloists' words are rather long compared to the length of the soloist's main portion in foot stomping cheers. It's possible that the soloist's words given here are a compilation of my daughter's memories of what different soloist said. It's also possible that each soloist said the exact same thing as given above.

I believe that this "Sophisticated Lady" example and the example posted below are derived from Natalie Cole's 1976 version of "Sophisticated Lady". That version starts with the repeated phrase "Sophisticated Lady".

****
SOPHISTICATED LADY (Version #2)
Suffocated lady,
Suffocated la-dy(this is said twice), then the first girl would sing

I'm a bad bad girl from a bad bad town,
it take a thousand ["the n word" deleted by editor]*
just to hold me down,
if you don't like my apples don't you pick em (not them) off my tree
cause I'm after you're lover
and he's after me. (this is repeated until every girl in the circle gets her turn)
cbwells26
CBWELLS26 (FT. Worth, TX , Tarrant) http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=4123&page=4; 1-02-2001

Editor:
This thread is a discussion of rhymes that women who are now members of historically Black Greek lettered sororities remember from their childhood.

"Suffocated" is a folk etymology form of the word "sophisticated".

*In that example the "n word" was written as an "n" followed by a series of random? typing symbols.

I found the exact same post [not just the example, but the entire post] in a no longer accessible June 2008 hawaiimoms.com forum thread. On that thread, a group of women were sharing the rhymes they remembered, and one woman armywife2006, who said she grew up on the mainland, shared a number of examples including the "Sophisticated Lady" example. I can only assume that armywife2006 and the Greekchat poster are the same person or armywife2006 copied that example from the Greekchat thread. But, given the nature of the discussion, that second possiblity seems unlikely.

This particular example of "Sophisticated Lady" cheer interests me for a number of reasons. Firstly, this is said to have been done in a circle, and I've never seen a foot stomping cheer done in a circle. Also, while the use of the "n word" in a cheer isn't all that surprising, I've never heard one with that pejorative referent, and I think that only a small percentage of foot stomping cheers or other playground rhymes include that pejorative. That said, I have found several more examples of "Down Down Baby" that include the "n" word. Each of those examples also have the "I'm a __ from a __ town/ it take a lot of __ to hold me down" structure.

Lastly, my research indicates that the "if you don't like my apples/don't shake my tree" rhyme is a variant form of a 1914 Blues song. The original words were "if you don't like my peaches...". Both of these patterns are being used (in very cleaned up form) as cheerleader rhymes. For an example of a clean "Down Down Baby" hand clap version with this pattern, click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes

****
STEP BY STEP
Step, step, step by step
(Foot Stomp)

By Step
(Foot Stomp)

To the beat now
(Extended foot stomp)

Well, Jennifer’s my name
And boys are my game
I got this boy on my mind
And Lord knows he’s fine
He calls me his girl
His one and only one
I don’t know his sign
But Gemini is mine

(Repeat)

Directions:
The girls stand in a line and each one sings the longer portion inserting her name and her zodiac sign. The foot stomp can be made up by the girls to fit the rhythm of the song, whichever they choose it to be.
- Jennifer (Korean), undergraduate female college student University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ; remembrances of rhymes she performed when she was 8-12 years ; (she indicates that she learned this from African American girls); collected in 2005 via email to Azizi Powell

****
STOMP AND GRIND
Hey you, ya
Hey you ya
i heard your name across the street
and they say you aint gotno beat
well honeychild they must be blind
cause they aint seen my stomp and grind.
stomp and grind stomp stomp and grind
-Emma ; 6/1/2007

Editor:
I posted this on the Foot Stomping Cheer page because I'm guessing that the group says the first part and the soloist says the rest-starting with "Well, honeychild."

This cheer is new to me. Does anyone else know it? If so, send your example and comments to cocojams17@yahoo.com Thanks!

****
STOP LOOK AND LISTEN
Group except soloist: Stop look and listen
Soloist #1: My name is Rhonda
Group except soloist: Stop Look and Listen
Soloist: My sign is Pisces
All: Stop, Look, and Listen

(Repeat with the next soloist who gives her name or nickname, and her astrological sun sign)
-Tazi M. Powell (African American female, memories of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the early 1980s)

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-cheerleader-cheers to find a children's cheerleader example of "Stop Look and Listen".

****
SUPER SUPERSTAR
Editor: This example is included in a 1983 book about African American children's rhymes from Houston, Texas. Although no designation of speakers is given, it's clear that this chant utilizes the group/consecutive soloist structure that is a signature characteristic of foot stomping cheer. This chant also uses the same formulaic lines as other introduction foot stomping chants that are featured on this page. Unfortunately, no performance information is provided for this example or any other example in that book.

Super Superstar
Hey
Akira is my name
Superstar
Kickball is my game
Winning on my mind
Hey
Scorpio is my number one sign
Super Superstar
Hey

Super Superstar
Hey
Nathalee is my name
Basketball is my game
Winning on my mind
Hey
Leo is my number one sign
Super Superstar
Hey
- Barbara Mitchells & Bettye White, "Apples On A Stick, The Folklore of Black Children (New York, Coward -McCann, Inc, 1983, p. 12)

****
TABA
All: Taba Taba Tab.
First person: My name is Sonji.
Rest of Group: Tab.
First person: go to school.
Group: Tab.
First person: I'm supercool.
Group: Tab
I used to gamble.
Group: Tab
First person: But now I don’t.
Group: Tab
First person: And never will.
Group: Tab
First person: Me and my man.
Group: Tab
First person: In the van.
Group: Tab
First person: Had a fight.
Group: Tab
First person: Last night.
Group: Tab
First person: He knocked me down.
Group: Tab.
First person: I got back up
Group: Tab.
First person: And kicked his butt .
Childhood.

This is a call and response chant from the late 70's early 80's Elkhart Indiana; The chant starts over again with the next person in the group and so on.
-Sonjala A.: {African American female} 3/15/2008

Editor:
The word "childhood" at the end of this cheer probably serves the same purpose as the word "child" at the end some African American sayings. In this context, I think that the word "child" means "yeah".

****
TELEPHONE
(Whole group)
Telephone, tel-telephone
I said
Telephone, tel-telephone

Hey Jennifer

(Single person)
Yeah

(Whole group)
Somebody wants you on the telephone.

(Single person)
Who is it?

(Whole group)
A boy.

(Single person)
I know what he wants.
He wants my lips, my hips, my booty and my kiss.

(Whole group)
Telephone, tel-telephone
I said
Telephone, tel-telephone

Hey Jennifer.

(Single person)
Yeah?

(Whole group)
Somebody wants you on the telephone.

(Single group)
Who is it?

(Whole group)
A girl.
(Single person)
I know what she wants.
She wants my man, I can’t stand, that girl is out of hand.

Directions:
Again, in this one, the girls line up and each one has her turn to be the “single person”.
- Jennifer (Korean), undergraduate female college student University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ; remembrances of rhymes she performed when she was 8-12 years in Pittsburgh area (no year given. Jennifer indicated that she learned this from African American girls); collected in 2005 via email to Azizi Powell

Editor:
Jennifer described this examples as belonging to the "Call and Response" category.
See "Step By Step" and "Candy Girl (Version #2) on this page for other examples of cheers from this contributor.

****
TELL IT
My name is ______________ (Tell it Tell it)
Zodiac sign my sign (Tell it Tell it)
And if you don't like it (Tell it Tell it)
You can kiss my behind (Tell it Tell it)
You know what? (What?)
You know what? (What?)
My name ________and I can do it like this! (do a dance)
-Honeykiss1974, http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=31403&page=3,03-26-2003,

****
TETHER BALL
Little black girls at Windsor Hills Elementary School in Los Angeles, CA during the early 1990s chanted this rhythmic taunt in a circle on the playground:

(all) Tether ball (clap), tetherball (clap)
(all) ooosha-asha (twist body/butt from side to side)
(all) Tether ball (clap), tetherball (clap)
(all) ooosha-asha (twist body/butt from side to side)
(solo) My name (clap) is __________
(all) Tether (clap) ball
(solo) I'm (clap) (some adjective/adjective clause that describes yourself)
(all) Tether (clap) ball
(solo) You mess (clap) with me
(all) Tether (clap) ball
(solo) I'll (clap) (some adverbial clause that rhymes with your adjective/adjective clause and describes what you'll do to someone/how you'll protect yourself)
(all) Tether (clap) ball
-Milan W., 11/18/2009

****
TING A LING A LING
All: Ting a ling a ling
School bells ring
Booyaka! Booyaka!
Soloist: And Rhonda sings*.
-snip-
The foot stomping cheer begins again with the next soloist, and continues until every member of the group has had a turn as soloist.
--Tazi.M. Powell; (African American female, memories of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, early 1990s); posted by Azizi Powell 4/20/2010

The soloist's name or nickname is the last line of the cheer.

Repeat from the beginning with a new soloist who says her name or nickname & does a short foot stomping step. The cheer then begins again with the next soloist. This pattern continues until everyone in the group has had one turn as the soloist.

This cheer is based on lyrics from Shabba Rank's Dancehall Reggae song "Tinga ling a ling".
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/09/shabba-ranks-tinga-ling-ling-wit... for a post about this Dancehall Reggae song.
****.
TUITY FRUITY
Tootie Fruity: tootie fruity..
fresh and fruity....
watch (girls name)
shake her booty..
BOOM BOOM shes got it!!
BOOM BOOM shes got it!!

(and go on down the line of cheerleaders)
-Sarah S.; 2/11/2008

****
TWO WAY PASS AWAY
All: Two way pass away. Two way pass away.
Soloist #1: Well, my name is Shana.
Group: Two way pass away.
Soloist #1: And if you don’t like it,
Group: Two way pass away.
Soloist #1: You can kiss what I twist.
And I don’t mean my wrist.
-African American girls {around 8-12 years old},
Braddock, PA, 1985; Collected by Azizi Powell, 1985

(Repeat the entire cheer from the beginning with the next soloist and continue repeating until every member of the group has had one turn as the soloist.)

Editor:
"Two Way Pass Away” is a confrontation style foot stomping cheer that was performed in 1985 by a group of pre-teen African American girls living in Braddock, PA (about 10 miles from Pittsburgh, PA). When girls perform confrontation style cheers, they are trying to show off their street "cred" (credibility). The girls are acting the role of a street wise, sexy females who can get & can keep any man, and who "don't take no stuff" from any other girl. Keeping the beat is the most important part of footstomping cheers. But it’s also important to chant these words with confidence and a tough girl attitude. Thus, girls would never smile when chanting these rhymes. They look people in the eye, and have a “grittin” or expressionless face, and they may incorporate body gestures like “talk to the hand”.

The first and only time that I heard this cheer was in 1985 when a group of young girls started chanting it while they waited for other children to come to the African storytelling session I was contracted to provide. Luckily, I had an audio tape recorder, and the girls were receptive to being taped. I gave "Two Way Pass Away" high mark for creative attitude, especially the "You can kiss what I twist and I don’t mean my lips” line. I know what that line meant, but what about the “Two Way Pass Away” title and refrain? Unfortunately, none of the girls could tell me what it meant. I also transcribed the words to this chant at that time, but having never seen the cheer in written form, the girls couldn’t tell me if the first word in the title was written “two, or “too” or to”. I arbitrarily chose “two”, thinking that the rhyme might be talking about a two way street, or something else, but what? Of course, the girls felt that my questions about the cheer’s meaning were beside the point. Children don’t perform cheers to make some heavy duty sociological or psychological statement. They perform cheers because they enjoy doing so.

Years passed, and it wasn’t until 1998 that I found a clue that pointed to this cheer’s meaning. As luck would have it, I happened to buy a used book about “Negro” folk rhymes and from a chapter in that book learned about the Golden Blades, Yellow Pocahontas, and other Wild Indian musical/social organizations of African Americans from the New Orleans, Louisiana area. I learned from that book that since the late 1880s, the Wild Indians have created beautiful feather costumes and paraded down the streets during Mardi Gras and other holidays, in celebration (some say in imitation) of Native American ethnic groups and in honor of their ethnic and historical ties to Native Americans. One of the main chants that is associated with the Wild Indian groups is “Tu Way Pakaway”. I believe that “Tu Way Pakaway” is the source of the title & refrain of the Two Way Pass Away” children's foot stomping cheer.

Even though I wasn't one of them, it's not hard to imagine that there are some African Americans from the Pittsburgh area would have some knowledge about the Mardi Gras Indians since a number of African Americans living in Pittsburgh came from the South. It stands to reason that some of the Pittsburgh area Black folks are bound to have come from New Orleans, Lousiana and nearby communities. And whether we have family from the South or in the South or not, Black folks travel. So somebody might have heard that "Tuway Packaway" Mardi Gras Indian chant. It's also possible that some folks (regardless of race or ethnicity) in the Pittsburgh area could have seen a magazine article, read a book, or seen a televised show about Mardi Gras Indians, and/or heard the "Tu Way Pakaway" chant, and then shared it with other folks, including some children and pre-teens. And then it's possible that the creative process could have taken over, resulting in this foot stomping cheer. The tune of the cheer is somewhat like the Mardi Gras Indian song, but its moderate tempo is faster than some of the versions of "Tuway Packaway" that I have heard.

Regrettably, I have been unable to locate and interview the girls who performed this chant in 1985 to test this theory. Shortly after that year, the public housing development where the girls lived was torn down, and families moved elsewhere. In 1997 I facilitated a ibngoing cultural project in the city of Braddock which presented a number of opportunities for me to meet with and collect children's rhymes from African American women & children, including women who would have been those girls' ages. Unfortunately, I've not come across anyone in Braddock or neighboring Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania who knows that "Two Way Pass Away" cheer.

Of course, if my theory is correct that "Tu Way Packaway" is the source of the title and refrain of "Two Way Pass Away", the word "two" in the cheer’s title & refrain should have been written "tu". But I've gotten used to that word being spelled the way it is. So I guess I'll just leave it like it is. And if you don't like it.. well... you know the rest. :o)

-snip-

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/mardi-gras-indian-songs-chants for text examples of "Tuway Packaway" and other Mardi Gras Inidian chants. That Cocojams page also includes videos of a related composition "Hey Pocky Way" and other videos.

U, V

W, X ,Y, Z
WECOME FROM ROCK
we come from broad rock
bka tha rock
and we are mighty bandit
and we say hello ma name is
jada bka jj
and im a mighty bandit
and i say hello

then u call on some body else and they say their
name and bka and say who they cheer for then
they say and i say hello bka stands for be called
as
-jadaboo ; 10/12/2008

Editor:
Thanks, jadaboo, for sharing this example. Thanks also for explaining the "bka" means. You wrote that these letters mean "to be called as". I wouldn't be surprised if "bka" originally stood for "better known as". Maybe tha abbreviation came from "aka" which means "also known as". I see from the example that you sent in that saying "bka" served as a signal for the group to give the nickname for "broad rock" and for the "soloist" to give her nickname. I'm wondering if "Broad Rock" is a nickname for the city of Little Rock, Arkansas or is actually the name of the city where you live. Btw, I posted this example in the foot stomping cheer page because it's format "reads" like those cheers.

****
WHAT YOUR HEART BEATIN FOR
All: What your heart beatin for?
You Scared?
Soloist: I'm not.
But they is.
They betta fall back.
Before they get slapped
My name is Raya
And I'm not wid that.
-CanRaya E. & Sha'ona K; 6/12/2008

[Repeat the cheer with the next soloist, who repeats the cheer from the beginning. When the soloist says her lines, the other soloists are silent but continue doing the foot stomping cheer routine.]

Editor:
CanRaya and Sha'ona sometimes make minor changes are made. For instance, the girls said that instead of saying "slapped", you can say "cracked".

****
WHO ROCKS THE HOUSE
I said who rocks tha house (name of school)
i say faith rocks the house
yes all tha way down
uhuh all the way down
-Annabelle; 7/31/2006

Editor:
My daughter and her friends did this cheer in the 1980s as a foot stomping routine. The cheer started from the beginning as each person in their informal group had a turn being the soloist. I'm assuming that "Faith" is a girl's name and that Annabelle and her friends performed this cheer the same way it was done "way back then".

This example could also have been placed on the Cocojams Cheerleader Cheers page. After all, foot stomping cheers may be considered to be a longer form of dance style cheerleader cheers.

*****
YOU AINT GOIN NO WHERE
All: You ain’t goin no where, no where.
You ain’t goin no where.
You ain’t goin no where, no where.
You ain’t goin no where.
Group minus soloist : Hey, Shadeya.
In-tro-duce yourself.
Shadeya: Too shy
Group: Hey, Shadeya. In-tro-duce yourself
Shadeya: I’ll try.
My name's Shadeya.
I cheer for Garfield.*
My sign is Libra.
And when I’m up
Group: When she’s up.
Shadeya: I’m hot stuff.
Group: She’s hot stuff.
Shadeya: And when I’m down.
Group: And when she’s down.
Shadeya: Don’t mess around.
Group: Don’t mess around.
Shadeya: Don’t make me scream.
cause you will be _knocked _out.
-Shadeya, Pittsburgh, PA}; 2002; collected by Azizi Powell; 2002

" __ " means to pause a beat. * name your community or school athletic cheerleading team; "My sign" means the person's astrological sun sign.

Repeat the entire cheer from the beginning with the next soloist who says her name or nickname, the name of the sport or community team she cheers for. The girl doesn' have to really be a cheerleader. She is engaging in dramatic play- that is-she's pretending to be a cheerleader.

Continue this pattern until every one in the group has had one turn as the soloist.

Editor: This cheer was collected from the same Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania neighborhood as the multiple cheers included on this page from the mid 1980s, as remembered by Tazi M. Powell (TMP; my daughter).

****
VIDEO EXAMPLES OF THE HAND CLAP & FOOT STOMPING ROUTINE

Example #1
This video demonstrates one way that foot stomping cheers can be performed. Every foot stomping cheer doesn't include the over the head, under the leg clap. Often chanters just clap in front of their body (slightly below their chest). Also, I've never seen or read of foot stomping cheer performances involving clapping another person's hands. This is (another) way that foot stomping cheers differ from hand clapping games.

Remember these chants are always performed by two or more persons (usually girls).

Step

posted by swtytwty9988
July 04, 2006

****
Example #2
The clap hands, slap thigh pattern shown in this video is another performance style that I've seen done while chanting foot stomping cheers. However, in those foot stomping cheer routines, the actual foot stomp would be more pronounced than what is shown in this video.

Gap Cheer 763 34st

Uploaded by symmitry1 on Nov 8, 2009

The Flagship Gap store at 34st invites you to share their CHEER!!! No, you're not dreaming, it IS the coolest GAP in the world!!! AND the biggest in NYC!!!...

-snip-

Also see the Sesame Street videos found above for additional examples of foot stomping cheer movements.

****
SIMILAR STRUCTURAL PATTERN
This example of a traditional West African song eminds me of foot stomping cheers' group/soloist pattern. The example, which I refer to as "Xylophone Talk" is included in a book about traditional African music. The composition is an interpretation into the Fang language of Gabon, West Africa of notes that were played on a xylophone. When I read this, it reminded me of the group/soloist structure of foot stomping cheers, However, this example probably doesn't have the consecutive soloist feature that is a signature characteristic of foot stomping cheers.

Xylophone: Hey there girls!
Dancers:Yes!
Xylophone: Where are you from?
Dancers: We are from Endumsangm, from Nseme Nzimi's family. You can see from his eyes that ihe is sad and would be capable of dying of hunger right next to a pile of sugar cane.
Xylophone: Aha?
Dancers: Aha!
-Francis Bebey, African Music (Chicago, Illinois, Lawrence Hill Books,1975, p. 88) recorded by Herber Pepper

-snip-

Compare that example with the structure of this dialogue chant that is included in a 1983 collection of children's rhymes. I've given this example the title "Hey Girl Whatcha Got" :

Hey girl
Whatcha got
Soda pop
Gimme some
Uh-huh
Buy you some.

Hey brother
Whatcha got
Soda pop
Gimme some
Uh-huh
Buy you some

Hey sister
Whatcha got
Soda pop
Gimme some
Uh-huh
Buy you some

Hey mother...

Hey uncle...
-Barbara Mitchells & Bettye White, "Apples On A Stick, The Folklore of Black Children (New York, Coward -McCann, Inc, 1983, p. 22)

****
RELATED PAGES

http://cocojams.com/content/classification-foot-stomping-cheers-introduc...

http://cocojams.com/content/classification-foot-stomping-cheers-examples

http://cocojams.com/content/command-compliance-foot-stomping-cheers

http://www.cocojams.com/content/fraternity-sorority-step-stroll-related-... for hyperlinks to videos of steppin'. ("Stepping" is very similar to how foot stomping cheers are performed.)

****
Please send examples of & comments about footstomping cheers to cocojams17@yahoo.com for possible posting on this website.

Your email address is never posted or shared.

Or if you are on facebook, visit me at cocojams jambalayah, and befriend me, or send me a private message!

Please be aware that by sharing your examples or comments with me, you are giving me permission to include it in a book or in any other off-line publication.

Thanks!

Share! Learn! Enjoy!

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